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April 07, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-07

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THE DAILY I
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND I
TlHE CAMPUS

TIGAN n

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 90
TELEGRAPI SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL.4XVT. No. 13l

w

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 1916..

PRICE FIVE CENTS

YEAR TO BE ADDED
TO CURCUU
IN DENTAL COLLEGE
RE GENS INA GURATE RULE TO
TARE EFFECT DURING
YEAR 1917-1
MEMORIAL SERVICE ENDORSED
T. Hawley Tapping, '161, Nominated
as Member of Board in Con-
trol of Athletics

Roosevelt tlakes
Candidacy Publie
Speed-i-Which '. R. "'oeq It
in Ring" Is Surprise to
Ne: York, April 6-The tossing of
Theodore Roosevelt's hat into the ring
today, as a candidate for president,
was a surpe 1;;e to politicians. .That
something Uke this was to follow the
meeting of Elihu Root, Senator Lodge,
General Leonard Wood and Mr. Roose-
velt, at tiv, Mome of Robert Bacon last
week, hail een anticipated, but had
not been expected so soon. Political
observers had but one explanation to
offer to his turn in the situation, and-
that was that a wrong interpretation
had been put upon the meeting.
Adherents of Senator Root jumped
to the conclusion that Colonel Roose-
velt was to stand behind his former
secretary of state and pull the Pro-
gressive party with him. Adherents
of Justice Hughes had concluded that
the Colonal and Mr. Root had met to
discuss the best ,:ay to put up Mr.
Hughes as the candidate of both par..
ties.
--__--____-__
Fortification Bill
P resenzted inHouse

LUNDGREN NAMIES
SOUTHERN TRIP
BASEBALL SQUAD
TEAM LEAVES FOR TOLEDO THIS
EVENING AT 7:40 WITH
15 MEN
SODDY 61IYES UP ANNUAL TOUR
Battery Choice for First Game With
Kentucky Will Be Miller
and Dunne
Following is the Michigan bat-
ting order for tomorrow's game
against the University of Ken-
tucky in Lexington:
Win. Niemann........right field
Smith...............second base
Walterhouse .........shortstop
Brandell ...........center field
Labadie............left field
Newell .......... . ... first base
Warner.............third base
Dunne................catcher
Miller .................pitcher

French Recover
Ground at Verdun

ermans Got Footlid at
by Night Attack
TWO Points

'OBREGON, MEXICAN WAR MINISTER,
IBELIEVES PURPOSE OF EXPEDITION
IAGAINST VILLA HAS, BEEN FULFILLED

Hancourt
at

One year was added to the regular
course in dental surgery at yester-
day's meeting of the board of regents,
the change to take effect at the start
of the year 1917-1918. Students en-
tering after this time will be required
to take a four-year course.
Because of the large number of stu-
dents now applying to the dental col-
lege, a four-year program for those
electing it will be started beginning
October 3, 1916. All who prefer enter-
ing the four-year curriculum then, as
well as all who cannot be accommo-
dated in the three-year curriculum,
will be matriculated in the four-year
program.ยง
The regents also recommended that
the university senate provide for a
memorial service in honor of the late
President-Emeritus James B. Angell,
to be held soon after spring vacation.
The regents also approved the es-
tablishment of a combined .literary-
engineering course with Olivet college,
similar to the one now in operation
Sin connection with Albion college.
Combined literary - medical courses
with Albion and Ohio Wesleyan were
approved.
Robert A. Greve, superintendent pro
temr of the university hospital since
the death of former superintendent
Draper, was appointed superintendent.
The nomination of T. Hawley Tap-
ping, '16L, as student member of the
board in control of athletics, was ap-
proved. Tapping was nominated by
the board to fill the unexpiredterm of
Fred Gould.
The use of Waterman gymnasium
one night each week and of south
Ferry field was granted as a parade
ground for the newly organied Michi-
gan division of naval militia.
A number of degrees were granted
by the regents at yesterday's meeting:
bachelor of civil engineering, Harry
C. Coons; bachelor of mechanical en-
gineering, E. R. Stone; bachelor of
chemical engineering, T. F. Fead,
Thomas K. Hutson; bachelor of laws,
H. A. Balser, C. S. Neithercut, W. A.
Neithercut, J. B. Speer, F. S. Terral-
ba, F. W. Bolin, Davis J. Cable, John S.
Primrose, R. D. Simmonds; bachelor
of science, R. S. Cron, bachelor of arts,
Bernard Pierce, Grace Thomasma
(with high distinction) ; master of
arts, L. P. Duell, C. T. Tan; master
of science in public health, N. S. Har-
diker, M. D.; certificate from the
homeopathy school for nurses, Helen
Thomas; nurses' diplomas from uni-
versity hospital, Hazel McFadyen, Me-
lina Maxson.
the regents also accepted a number
of gifts. The Michigan Daughters of
the American Revolution presented
$113 to found a loan fund for senior
girls, which was accepted with thanks
by the regents. A $50 gift from New
York alumni -was accepted to found
a scholarship to be known as the
Eliza ,Mozier fund, in honor of the
former dean of women, who is now
practicing medicine in Brooklyn, N. Y.
The regents also extended thanks to
Dr. Bryant Walker of Detroit for his
offer to bear the expense of a museum
expedition to the Davis mountains in
western Texas during the coming sun-
mer. Dr. Ruthven is to take charge
of this trip. The board also voted its
thanks to Dr. W. W. Newcomb of De-
troit, who offered to share the expense
with Dr. Walker of "Occasional Pa-
pers." another zoology publication.
Duty on Dyestuffs Proposed by !tens.
Washington, ). C., April 6.-Pro-
tection with a string tied to it is being
given to American manufacturers of
dyestuffs by the Democrats in con-
gress.
It became known today that the

Democrats plan to place a duty on
dyestuffs in their new revenue meas-
ure, which could be removed as soon
as the German dyes are free to enter
the United States again.

Proiv isiojIs Include Expenditure
$100,000,000 for Increasing
C'oast Defenses

of

Washington, April G. - The third
great element of the national pre-
paredness program today was brought
into the House. It is the largest for-
tification billever reported. It is
proposed to spend approximately $100,-
000,000 to increase and modernize the.
coast defenses, and to supply an ample
store of reserve ammunition for the
guns.
Included in the bill are provisions
for mounting _364ncbr direct-fire rifles
to guard New York, Boston, San Fran-
cisco, and other great cities, from long.
range naval bombardment. Provision
also is made for mounting 12-inch
rifles now in reserve so they will have
a range of more than 30,000 yards, or
15 sea miles. In approving the bill,
the committee accepted almost with-
out alteration the proposals of the
War department and the officers who
have studied the subject of coast de-
rense for years.
INLANDER TODAPPEA
AFER SPRING RECESS

Magazine Will Comprise 28
Price Has Been Fixeda
.p Ten Cents
The Inlander, Michigan's
magazine, will make its first;

Pages
at
literary
appear-

Following the appearance of the
Michigan. baseball squad before the
eligibility committee last night, Coach
Lundgren announced that the follow-
ing 15 men would make the southern
trip:
Newell, Smith, Warner, Walterhouse,
Labadie, Wm. Niemann, Brandell,
Dunee, Arentz, Robins, Miller, Andrus,
Ohlmacher, Roberts and Caswell. The
"team, which will be accompanied by
Coach Lundgren and Student Manager
Sidney Steen, will leave Ann Arbor for
Toledo tonight at 7:40 o'clock.
The above lineup is much the same
as the coach has been using for th
past 'week in the daily workouts on
Ferry field. Tom Soddy, the only vet-
eran on the Michigan pitching staff,
decided at the last minute to pass up
the annual southern tour in order that
he might stick to the big'books a little1
more closely for the present. Coach
Lundgren stated that the team needed
Soddy badly but that he respected the
left hander's decision.
Coach ILundgren stated last night
that the chances were Robins would
be pressed into service tomorrow aft-
ernoon against the Kentucky outfit,
although Miller will open the game.
Neither of these two boys has received
enough outside work to enable him to
step through a full game as nicely as
they will be able to do later on. Hence
the coach has about decided to whack
the burden and the chances are that
the pair will og about 50-50. "Morry"
Dunne will be behind the plant hand-
ling Miller, with Arentz held in re-
serve.
The team will work out today on
Ferry field as usual.
GERMAN PLAYER TO LECTURE
"Fraulein Marie Mayer, of Oberaninter-
gaii, to Appear in University Hall
Fraulein Marie Mayer, of Oberam-
mergau, Bavaria, who plays the part
of Mary Magdalene in "The Passion
Play," will speak on "The Message of
Oberammergau" on Friday, April 21,
in University hall. Fraulein Mayer
is the only participant in the play who
has appeared before the American
public.
"The Passion Play" was first given
in the latter part of the 17th century,
and is now presented every ten years,
the last performance being held in
1910. Fraulein Mayer will tell of the
Passion Play, its action, and the vil-
lage of Oberammergau. She attended
Cambridge University for two years,
and is said to speak English excel-
lently.
Zupelli, Italian War Minister, Resigns
Rome. April 6'.-General Zupelli, the
minister of war, has resign'ed on ac-
count 'of ill health. King Victor Em-
manuel has accepted his resignation
and appointed General Paolo Morrone,
commander of an army corps, to suc-

Paris, April 6.-By means of a series
of small engagements, the French
troops are slowly recovering ground
between the Caillette wood and Douau-
mont, and regained today 200 meters
on a front of 500 meters. The gain was
made by hand to hand fighting. A
German counter attack, which was
started toward night, broke down un-
der the French fire.
Germans Gain in Haucourt
A heavy German attack on the west
bank of the river last night gained
a foothold in the village of Haucourt.
The attack was made simultaneously
at two points of the Avocourt-Bethin-
court front and continued through the
night. The attack at the latter point
was completely checked. Haucourt,
which is in a hollow dominated by the
heigths to the east, is now under fire
of the French guns on these heights,
according to the official afternoon
communication.
French Check Declared
Berlin, April 6.-After a preparatory
fire lasting all day, the German forces
stormed the village of Haucourt and a
point to the east of the village last
night. A renewal of the French effort
to recapture the position in the Cail-
lette wood, and to the northwest of
the wood, was checked immediately.
COUNCIL SELECTS DATE
aFOR SPRING CONTESTS
Name May 19 and 20) for Annmi'l
Games: Recommend '41" Pres-
entation in Hill Aiiditorih n
Sophomores and freshmen occupied
the greater part of the discussion at
the meeting of the student council
last evening.
May 19 and 20 have been selected as
the dates for the annual spring games.
On Friday afternoon the tug-of-war
will be staged across the Huron and
the obstacle races and push ball con-
test will take place Saturday morn-
ing on south Ferry Field.
The council also recommended the
presentation of football "M's" in Hill
Auditorium next fall. Hitherto this
ceremony has taken place at a mon-
ster football smoker in Waterman
gymnasium and the change has been
suggested in order to permit the en-
tire student body to witness the
presentation.
SOP H PR1OM TAKES PLACE
IN ARMORY ON MAY 12

TWO BISHOPS TO SPEAK
AT VACATION SERYICES
Rt. Rev. G. Mott Williams and Rt. Rev.
* John N. McCormick to Preach
at St. Andrew's Church
The Rt. Rev. G. Mott Williams,
bishop of Marquette, and the Rt. Rev.
John N. McCormick, bishop of Western
Michigan, will speak at St. Andrew's
church during the two Sundays in the
coming vacation as special speakers
on the Lenten program which has been
given in St. Andrew's church through-
out the Lenten season.0
Bishop Williams, who will speak at
both services Sunday, has announced

ance immediately after spring vaca-
tion. Three leading articles, one on
the late President-Emeritus James B.
Angell, written by Prof. Henry C.
Adams, one on the Shakespearean
Tercentennial by Prof. L. A. Strauss,
and one on the re-establishment of
the magazine by Prof. F. N. Scott, will
occupy the prominent positions.
Three stories and six poems have
been contributed by students, besides
several pages of editorials and a
number of articles on serious topics..
The magazine will comprise 28
pages, and will be of the same size as
the Michigan Alumnus. Copy has al-
ready gone to the printers and proof
will be read during vacation, prepara-
tory to putting the magazine on sale
soon after classes resume. The price
has been established at 10 cents. 1
Simplified Spelling Makes Gains
New York, April 5.--The number of
universities, colleges, and normal
schools which have adopted simplified
spelling now is 144, a gain of 57 in!
the last year, according to .a report
made to the simplified spelling board
at its annual meeting here today. In
these institutions there are 130,000
students. The number of newspapers
and periodicals using at least the 12
simpler spellings adopted by the Na-'
tional Education association has in-
creased from 70 to 250.

Dn e

Will Be Informal, According

>

to Jt. C. Bane Barron, 'en-.
eral Chairman
This year's Soph Prom will be held
on May 12 in the Thirty-first regi-
ment armory. The dance is to be
informal, according to J. C. Lane Bar-
ron. '18, general chairman for the
event. It is suggested that the men
will wear white trousers and blue
coats. The decorations for the hall
promise to be an innovation.,
Whitney Speech to Be Distributed
A speech delivered by Prof. A. S.
Whitney of the department of educa-
tion, before ' the recent meeting of
the Schoolmasters' club last week, has
been printed in pamphlet form, and
will be distributed to the various prin-
cipals and superintendents throughout
the state. The subject matter of the
booklet pertains to statistics worked
out by Professor Whitney in regard to
the rating of the different high schools
throughout the state, and the com-
parative education that their super-
intendents and principals have re-
ceived in respect to the number of de-
grees received, and years passed in
colleges and normal schools. A chart
also mentions the number of pupils
that these high schools send to the
various colleges and universities.
Women to Encamp at Presidio in ,June
San Francisco, April 6.-Two hun-
dred bnd fifty women will go into
camp on the Presidio here on June 1
for six weeks under strict military rule
to learn the ways of war.

BISHOP G. MOTT WILLIAMS
of the Diocese of Marquette
as his subjects "A Good Conscience,"
in the morning, and "The Gospel Ac-
cording to Abraham" in the evening.
As a preacher and linguist Bishop Wil-
liams has a national reputation. He
has translated several foreign works
into the English language and during
the past several years he has been
promoting a plan of unification be-
tween the Episcopal church of Swe-
den and the Anglican communion in
this country. He is also bishop in
charge of the Episcopal churches in
the war-ridden countries of Europe,
and during the past two years he
has done much in aiding conditions
in those countries.
Bishop McCormick, who 'will speak
at both services on April 16, is well
known as an author and preacher, and
during the past several years he has
spent considerable time in the large
parishes of the east as a special
preacher. He comes to Ann Arbor
from Baltimore and New York City
where he will have spent the weekl
in giving special addresses. He will
speak on "The Publicity of Christ" at
the 10:30 o'clock service, and on "The
Authority of Christ" at the evening
service at 7:30 o'clock.
FORD'S MAJORITY NEAR 6,000
Auto Manufacturer Increases Lead in
"Favorite Son" Contest,
Detroit, April 6.-Henry Ford's ma-
jority over Senator Smith for the hon-
orary position of Michigan's "favor-
ite son" was increased to more than
5,000 votes today and is still climbing.
It is now practically certain that
Ford's majority will reach approxi-
mately 6,000, and that he carried the
state as well as the city of Detroit
and Wayne County. k
Zepp Raids to Continue, Papers Say
Geneva, April 6.-The newspaper
at Friedreichshaven, and other jour-1
nals near the Zeppelin headuarters,
say that raids will continue throughout
the spring with London as their prin-
cipal objective. Great satisfaction
over the recent air raid on England
is' expressed. Count Ferdinand Zep-
pelin, at Stuttgart, is daily receiving
telegrams and letters of congratula-
tion on the success of recent attacks.

WORR OF U. S. TROOPS IN CHI-
HUAHiUA COMPLETED,
HE THINKS
LEADER SOUGHT NEAR SATEZO
P ershings Column Hunts for Bandits
in Country Around Scene of
GuIerero Battle
.l Paso, April 6.-General Obregon,
minister of war for Mexico, is confi-
dent that Villa has been completely
crushed in the Chihuahua campaign,
and that as a result of this fact the
work of the United States punitive
expedition in Mexico has been vir-
tually completed.
I n a dispatch' today to Consul Gar-
cia, Obregon advised that, according
to information from Chihuahua, Villa
has been defeated in several engage-
men ts with the Constitutionalist forces
The telegram reads in addition" that
"General Gutierrez, chief of the
forces in Chihuahua state, has assured
many that it will not be long before
Villa is cuptured."
American Mission Partly Performed
The Constitutionalist authorities
have authoritatively stated that Villa's
men are routed, and that he himself
is wounded is construed by the Con-
stitutionalists as the first step in the
acknowledgment to American troops
that their mission in Mexico has been
lerformed.
Neither Consul Garcia nor General
Gutierrez would talk today upon the
question of the use of the railroads
in Mexico by American troops. Gen-
eral Gaviera was also reluctant in
expressing himself upon the passage
of American troops any farther
south.
WILL FIGHT SOUTH OF SATEZO
San Antonio, April 6.-Somewhere
south of Satezo probably will figure
frequently in future reports of mili-
tary operations against Villa. Out
of the great mass of unofficial and
conflicting i reports, General Funston
and his staff have found none they
regard more probable than that made
by Consul Lechter of Chihuahua, sev-
era! days ago, when he said Villa was
a short way south of Chihuahua.
General Pershing has made no re-
cent reports as to Villa's whereabouts
or concerning the movements of the
advance cavalry, but General Funston
said today he had no doubt that by
this time at least one detachment had
gone as far as Satezo. From Satezo,
trails lead east and south and if Villa
did go to Satezo it is regarded as prac-
tically certain that he has continued
toward Parral.
Pershing Still Searching
General Pershing is still searching
the district-about Guerrero with cav-
alry and infantry, but this is being
done to clean out that part of the
band which scattered at the fight at
Guerrero, and also to locate Villa,
who many insist is still hiding within
half a day's ride within Guerrero.
Fifty prisoners, including women
and children. were murdered by band-
its between Torreon and Cacatecas
on March 28, when the marauders
wrecked the train on which they
were riding, according to word re-
ceived from Laredo today.
COMMITTEES AND CHAPERONES
ANNOUNCED FOR UNION DANCES
The committee for the Union dance
Tomorrow evenirv consists of Warren
C. Talcott, '16L, Raymond. M. Langley,
'18E, Chester W. Clark, '18, and George
W. Furlow, '19. The chaperons will
be Prof. A. G. Ruthven and Mrs. Ruth-
ven, and Mr. R. K. Holland and Mrs.

Holland.
The committee for the mid-vacation
dance to be held April 15 at the Union
l is Laurence C. Heustis, '17P, Donald
M. Drake, '17E, and Samuel H. Riggs,
'18. The chaperons -will be Prof. H.
H. Highie and Mrs. Higbie and Mr.
H. H. Seeley and Mrs. Seeley.
About 50 tickets for the Saturday
night 'adnce at the Michigan Union
are yet to be sold. They may be se-
cured at the Union desk today or Sat-
urday.

------ceed him. General Zupelli was ap-
Nine Lives Lost on Five Ships - Sunk pointed minister of war in October of,
London, April 6.-Five more ships 1914. He was born an Austrian sub-
were victims of central powers' sub- ject. His selection was due to Lieut.
marines during the last 24 hours. Nine Gen. Count Cadorna, the Italian com-
lives were lost. mander in chief.

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