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April 06, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-06

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TIHE I)AILY'
$l.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

139 x
t1'
IG

Phones :--Editorial 2414
Business 960
TIELEGRAPH SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

m

THE

VOL. XXVI. No. 132.

F

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 1916.

_......._. w

PRICE FIVE CENTS

MANY BIG ' A "EVENTS
ON POST-VACATION"
CAMPUS PROGRAM
MAY FESTIVAL CLASS GAUES, IN-
TERSCH4OLAS' IC MEET AN) SE-
NIOR ACTIVITIES ON LIST
BASEBALL SEASON WILL OPEN
U. S. Government Exhibit of Naval
Appliances and Appurtenances
Will Be Held
The campus is promised an unusual-
ly interesting program after spring
vacation.
There will be as uspal the big an-
nual May Festival, the class games,
the all-senior sing, the senior swing-
out, the opening of the baseball sea-
son, the interscholastic meet, "Cap
Night," the biennial engineering ex-
hibit, the appearance of the Michi-
ganensian, and elections to the various
honor and honorary societies.
The May Festival list this year con-
tains such celebrated names as Amato,
McCormack, Frieda Hempel, and Mat-
zenauer. McCormack was unable to
appear at the Festival last yearThe
Choral Union and the specially-train-
ed children's chorus will pay promin-
ent parts in the various programs. The
Festival dates are May 17 to May 20.
Open Season with Olivet
The Varsity baseball season will
open with Olivet on April 20, at the
conclusion of the southern trip which
Coach Lundgren's men will make dur-
ing the Easter holidays. Contests are
scheduled with several of the nearby
smaller colleges, while Notre Dame,
M. A. C., Syracuse and Cornell will
be the big games of the season. Penn-
sylvania, which usually appears on
Ferry field during Commencement
week, will not meet Michigan this
year.*
"Open season" for fresh caps will.
start with the Olivet game. This is in
accordance with a plan of the Student.
Council to have all the yearlings don
their spring headgear at the same
time.
Cap Night io Sleepy Hollow
The class contests, pushball, tug-
of-war, and the fresh-soph relays
will probably be staged some time dur-
ing the May Festival week. Definite
dates for these contests will be an-
nounced after the meeting of the Stu-
dent Council tonight.
The Cap Night festivities will prob-
ably be held in Sleepy Hollow again
this. year on Friday night, June 2,
when the prep and high school ath-
letes are here for the annual Michigan
track interscholastics
Big Naval Exhibition
The Michiganensian will appear on
senior "Swing-out" day, the exact date
of which has not been set as yet. The
all-senior sing, another of the big
senior functions of the year, will be
held some time after the resumption of
college work.
The biennial engineering exhibit on
May 17 and 18 will have as an added
feature an exhibition of equipment
from the U. S. navy department. All
the modern implements of war, in-
cluding torpedoes, various types of
guns and small arms, will be sent here
by the Federal authorities. A squad
of marines will be detailed for the
purpose of assisting in the manage-
ment of the exhibition.

WILL OF PRES1I)ENT AN ELL
RECEIVEID IN PROBATE COURT
The will of the late President-Emeri-
tus James B. Angell was filed in pro-
bate court yesterday. Its contents,
according to Judge W. Murray, will
not be made public until the tine of
probation, April 27. The will was
drawn up July 15, 1913.
ILL HEALTH CAUSES ITALIAN
WAR MINISTER TIO RES,4Ni
Rome, April 5.-General Gupelli,
minister of war, has resigned or' ac-
count of his health. King Victor Em-
manuel has appointed General Paiblo
Morrone, commander of the eastern
army corps, to succeed him.

Blc anks TilledGEMNSTPD
Ouit in 'Lit CleeSOPD
Fve-Minute ]_eriod taken in Classes ;N FAA DO1IIAIMONT

to Aiiswer Health Service
Quesionnares
More than 1200 questionnaires, filled
out and signed, were received yester-
(lay by the university health service
from students of the literary college.
A five-minute period was taken in
most of the classes to make out the
blanks. Because a few of the classes
could not be reached during the day,
the campaign probably will be com-
pleted in the college shortly after
spring recess.
Signed blanks already have been re-
ceived from the junior and freshman
classes of the engineering college, as
was stated yesterday, and the other
two classes of the college will be
reached in their class assemblies. In
the Lawschool and the Medical school
the questionnaires will be given out
shortly in the larger classes.
INCREASED ENROLLMENTf
IN ENGLISH DEPATMENT
Out of 1500 Students in Engineering
and Architecture, 1204) Are
Taking Such Work
In refutation of the prevalent no-
tion that students of the colleges of
engineering and architecture have nei-
ther taste nor inclination for the study
of English, statistics just ihade pub-,
lic show that of the 1500 students en-
rolled in these colleges this year, 1200
are taking English courses. This
condition is in striking contrast to con-
ditions existing four years ago when,
but 516 students in the conbined col-
leges were taking work in English.
An evident dislike of students for
required courses is shown by the fact
that while in the last four years thereĀ°
has been an increase of over 600 stu-
dents in these courses, required work
shows a gain of but 32.1
In all, the English courses show an
increase of over 1,000 per cent in
number of students, or in other words, '
practically four-fifths of the students
in the colleges of engineering and ar-
chitecture are this year engaged in the
study of English and allied courses.
'06E MAN BROTHER OF VILLA
Michigan Grad's Wife Calls Pancho7
Black Sheep of Family
Pedro Villa, '06E, brother of Fran-l
cisco Villa, the Mexican bandit and
outlaw, is a graduate of the engineer-
ing department of the university. Aft-
er his graduation here, he married a
Detroit girl and returned to Mexico.l
At present Mrs. Pedro Villa is in
Detroit at the home of her parents.
She stated that she had little respectt
for Pancho Villa, who is the blackr
sheep of the family.
TO HOLD MEETING OF MIL1TARY1
TRAINING CANDIDATES TONIGHT<
An important meeting of all students
interested in the formation of a mil-
tary-company at Michigan will be held
this evening at 7:30 o'clock in room
348 of the engineering building. Ma-
jor C. E. Wilson of te Michigan Na-
tional Guard will take charge of the
meeting. A definite action will be
taken towards the completion of this'
voluntary organization.
Board of Regents Meets Today 1
The Board of Regents will hold its1
regular April meeting today in the1
regents' room. Resolutions on the
death of President-Emeritus James B.1
Angell will be passed at today's meet-1

ing.
Fresh Engineers Hear Prof. Riggs
Prof. H. E. Riggs, of the civil en-
gineering department, spoke at thef
fresh engineer assembly yesterday, on1
the subject, "The Possibilities in thej
Field of Civil Engineering," and men-
tioned the names of many Michigan
graduates now holding prominent po-
sitions in this field.
During the business meeting, the
class elected Frank B. Manker base-
ball manager.

Teutons Gradually Forced Upon Wedge
North of hlardemont, Paris
Reports
NO INFANTRY MOVE AT VERD)UN
Paris, April15.-The German forces
which broke through the Douaumont-
Vaux line north of Verdun are Being
held moveless in their new positions.
Their attacks have not yet been
abandoned. The German assaults
were entirely unsuccessful against the
positions south of the village of
Douaumont yesterday afternoon.
'Taking advantage of a comparative
ill on the Doaumont front, the
French continued their attack farther
north along the lines, where a wedge
lies directly north of Fort Douaumont
and Hardemont lines upon which the
Germans at this point are being grai-
ually driven.
There was no infantry activity ini
the Verdun region today, although
thre was some artillery fighting on
the Douaumont sector.
An official communication issued
this afternoon states that there were
German activities on the eastern part1
of the line in Lorraine and Vosges.-
Sevrral miles of infantry attacks were1
repulsed by the French between Avau-
c(urt and St. Martin in Lorraine, and
small German reconnoitering parties
w-r repulsed. east of Calles.
GRADUATE ATTENDS RULER
1r. ll. (. Van Mack Starts oioo300-
Mile Journey Into Heart of Arabia
Dr. H. C. Van Vlack, '10M, in charge1
of the Michigan Busrah hospital, hasI
dust. started on a 300-mile trip to
Nedjd, in the heart of Arabia, for the!
purpose of operating on Abdul Azizl
Bin Laond, the ruler of that country.
lie will be the first missionary to en-
ter this territory.
in a letter to a friend here, lie says,
"It is hard to leave just now " * *
but the door into the heart of Arabia
has been opened and we must push
our outpost in and occupy."
Dr. Van Vlack is a Michigan grad-
uate who has been in Busra for sev-
eral years. His work there is sup-
ported by the funds raised in the1
annual Busrah campaigns.
PROFESSOR FRIDAY LEAVES FOR
MEETING OF TAX COMMISSION
Professor David Friday of the eco-
nomics department leaves today for
Detroit where he will attend a meet-
ing of the Michigan Tax Commission.
He was recently elected president of
this body. which consists mainly of
men who are intimately acquainted
with the tax situation in the state.
According to Professor Friday this
body expects to recommend many
changes in the system of taxation to
the legislature this year.
WOMEN HOLD BRTHDAY DANCE
Men Admitted Only by Invitation;1
Fischer's Orchestra Plays
The athletic department of the
Women's league will hold an unique
"birthday" dance at Barbour gymna-
sium at 8:30 o'clock tonight. Men will
be admitted to the entertainment only
by invitations, which must be secured
through the women.
A feature will be the collection of
the birthday money, each guest con-

tributing as many pennies as he or
she is old. The proceeds will go to
the athletic club house fund. Fischer's
orchestra will be on hand to furnish
the music.
Dean Jordan, Mrs. Gates, Miss Evans
and Miss Hood will act as chaperones
for the occasion. Cards of admission
for the men can be secured at the gym-
nasium. There will be no admission
fee.
Statistical Society Meets Tonight-
The first regular meeting of the
Statistical and Actuarial Society of
the University of Michigan will be
held in room 306, N. W. of University
hall, at 7:30 o'clock tonight. Several
names will be proposed for member-
ship at this time.

Mlay Call Union
after Dr Angel
Chicago Alumni Body Wants Proposed
Clubhouse Dedicated to Late
P'resident-Eneritus
Chicago, Ill., April 5.--The Chicago
alumni of the University of Michigan,
at a special meeting of the Board of
Governors held yesterday, voted to
start a general movement among all
Michigan alumni to dedicate the pro-
posed new Union clubhouse at Ann
Arbor to Dr. James B. Angell. It is
proposed to call the club house
"James Burrill Angell hall."
Definite steps will be taken as soon
as complete plans for the movement
can be made. With the large represen-
tation of alumni in this city, it is ex-
pected that the movement will get a
whirlwind start.
WOLVRINE RIFLEMEN
N atholies hlave Only Fighting Chance
for Title as -Result of
Yesterday's Victory
Michigan riflemen can now boast
tihe championship of class "B", for
in their match with the Oklahoma Ag-
gies yesterday, they succeeded in pil-
ing up a total of 987 points, enough
to secure the title from the hands of
Notre Dame, which up to the last
week or two, has been a formidable
contender for the honor. Only a per-
fect score of 1000 points can give the
Catholics a fighting chance for the'
title, and judging from their past per-
formances, this sees an impossibility.
The detailed scores of the Wolver-
ines in yesterday's match follow: Bate-
man, 199; Simons, 198; Schoepfle, 197;1
Clark, 197; Cutting, 196; team total,
987. Other scores were: Nicholson,
196; McIntyre, 196; Curtiss, 194;
Moody, 194; MacNaughton, 191;
GERMANY NOT TO ATTACK U. S.
Chancellor States There Is No Inten-
tin of Making War
Berlin, via wireless, April, 5-Ger-
many has no intention- of making war
on the United States, either now or in
the future. This was Bethmann-Holl-
weg's statement this afternoon in a
apeech before the Reichstag, regard-t
ed by many to be the most important
address which has been made since1
the beginning'of the war.
SPANISH STEAMER TORPEDOED
Eight on Gigo Drowned Through Refu-
sal to Allow Lowering of Boats1
Gibraltar, April 5.-Eight of the,
crew of the Spanish steamer Gigo, tor-1
pedoed in the Bay of Biscay, were
drowned through their refusal to the'
German submarine commander to al-
'low their boats to be lowered before'
tie ship was torpedoed. Part of the
crew of the Gigo was picked up by'
the British 'steamer Palo and brought
to Gibraltar.
)AVIS' ARTICLE IS IN MAGAZINE
Result of Series of Investigations by
Education Department

A recent article by Prof. C. O. Dav-
is, which is the result of a series of
investigations by members of the edu-
cation department, appears in the
March number of the Educational Ad-
ministration and Supervision maga-
zine, under the title, "Pupils from
Graded and Ungraded Elementary,
Schools."
This article appears immediately
following the action, taken by the
Michigan Schoolmasters' club in au-
thorizing the newly elected president,
Professor Davis, to appoint a ,com-
mittee for furthering research work
among teachers in the public schools.
The sum of one hundred dollars was
placed at the disposal of the commit-
tee to cover the expense of these in-
vestigations.
The action was taken after a strong
Plea by Professor Judd, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago.

CARRANZISTAS5 MAKE PRGESIN
SEARCH FOR VILLA1 LANCERS FROM
CHIHUAHUA JOIN MEXICAN BANDIT

i

**** * * * * * *
VACATION LOYALTY
Your high school . or prep
school should be represented at
Michigan's 1916 Interscholastic
meet to be held Friday and Sat-
urday, June 2 and 3. A little
boost from you while you are
home during spring vacation
to the principal of your school,
the athletic director, or members
of your prep school track team,
may have considerable weight
In causing that school to enter
Michigan's meet. Remember that
there is no medium so influential.
as the Interscholastic in inter-
esting prep school athletes in
the university.
***** * * * * *

*
*

SCHUPP ELECTED
OPERA CHARMAN
Managers of Costumes and Proper-
ties Will Be Chosen Soon After
Spring Vacation
Arthur A. Schupp, '17E, was elected
yesterday as general chairman of the
1917 Union opera.
This action came as a result of a
meeting of the Union committee on
committees, consisting of the presi-
dent of the Mimes, a representative
from the Mimes, the president of the
Union, the manager of the Union, and
the general chairman of this year's
opera.
''he' manager of costumes and the
waster 'of properties for next year's
production will be chosen at a meet-
ing to be held soon after spring va-
c tion
ADELPHI WINS IN PRELIMINARY
Will Debate With Winner of Tonight's
Contest in Final on May 5
The Adelphi debating team defeated
the Jeffersonians in the first prelim-1
inary of the Cup Debate last night,
taking the affirmative on the question:+
"Resolved, that there be vested in
the government, state and national,+
the exclusive right to manufacture+
and sell munitions of war."
The Alpha Nu and Webster teams1
meet in the second preliminary on the
same question in room B of the Law1
building at 8:00 o'clock tonight, Alpha
Nu taking the affirmative. Adelphi's1
team will meet the winner of this con-
test in the final cup debate on May 5.
Last Meeting of 1915-16 City Council
The last meeting of the 1915-16'
council of the city of Ann Arbor will'
be held tonighttwhen that body will
canvass the results of the recent elec-
tion.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin.
ity-Fair, with moderate northwest
,inds..
TODAY
9:34) o'clock-Regents' meeting, re-
gents' room, Law building.
5:00 o'clock-Mr. J. J. Albert Rous-
seau speaks on "Ecole Des Beaux Arts
do Paris," Tappan hall lecture room.
6:00 o'clock-Aristolochites, honor-
ary .pharmaceutical society's banquet,
Delta cafe.
7:30 o'clock - Christian Science]
society meets, Newberry hall.
S:00 o'clock -- Alpha Nu-Webster
Cup Debate, room B, Law Building.
U-NOTICES
Holders of tickets for last week's
Union dance must present them at the
desk in- the Michigan Union for' re-
demption before 3:00 o'clock today.
The senior pharmic class will meet
this afternoon at 2:15 o'clock in room
303, Chemistry uilding.

GARCIA, DE FACTO GOVERNMENT
LEADER, BELIEVED TO BE
ATTACKING ENEMY
OUTLAW REPORTED ON MOVE
Agents Said to Have Recruited Several
Hundred Ranchers for Ranks
of Bandit Chief
El Paso, April 5.-The forces of the
Mexican de facto government are like-
ly to accomplish the capture of Villa,
is the statement made today by Gen.
Gabriel Baziera, commander of the
Carranza forces at Navarez. Mexican
lancers in the district of Chihuahua
City are said to be joining Villa.
The telegram from General Louis
Guiterrez, commander of the city of
Chihuahua, informed General Baziera
that Romas Teranzo, one of Villa's
lieutenants, as well as Elizo Abran-
dez, were killed in the fighting either
with the American troops at San
Guantanamo or with the Mexican
troops at Guerrero.
The telegram of General Guiterrez
to General Gavira states that the Car-
ranza captain and two soldiers who
had been captured by Villa and were
with him at Guerrero have arrived at
Santo Ysabel and came on account of
the Guerrero engagement. The men
were from the Morelo brigade that
was commanded by Colonel Salaz.
They said that Villa, with 200 men,
went toward Llanos, San Juan, or
Pausista.
The men under the Villa general,
Bable Lopez, who was reported dead,
are now under L. Ganalildo Cerren-
tas, whose forces now number 200.
Gulio *Acosta, a Villa lieutenant, is in
the mountains of Guerrero -with a
band of 20 men, while Lopez with 100
men is in the vicinity of Backinize.
Carranzistas Capture Villa Riies
General Garcia reports that a num-
ber of scouts from the Constitution-
alist forces recently defeated the Vil-
listas at Lajadeabojaco and captured
their rifles. The message states that
by todayGeneral Garcia expects to be
upon the enemy now at Guenaca.
General Dazezos wired from Frena-.
tepe that he had attacked the enemy
in the central part of Bonito Juarez,
that he had killed 10 and wounded
many others. He also reports having
captured a number of rifles and some
ammunition. The loss to General Ca-
cazos is one man wounded and two
dead horses.
General Cacazos reports that he con-
tinues to pursue the enemy and Asks
that troops be rushed to Fatezo, Ger-
ternes and Nicai, in order that Villa
may not escape. General Cacazos is
the general who followed Villa to
Guerrero a week ago 'Monday and has
been in pursuit of him since that time.
General Pershing is still at the front,
according to advices reported today
from his Balonia Gablan headquarters
in the Casas Grandes. The weather
in the mountains where the American
army is operating has modified con-
siderably, but themountains are still
covered with snow which is melting
very slowly.
Lancers Join -Villa
Mexican lancers in the district of
Chihuahua City are reported in pre-
vious advices in Chihuahua to be join-
ing the Villa bandits in considerable
numbers. Villa agents are said to
have been recruiting many ranchers,
and several hundred are reported to
have left their homes and joined the
bands operating within 30 to 40 miles
of Chihuahua City.
Sixteen Mexicans were arrested this
afternoon in police raids. The police

say the men are believed to have been
implicated in the plot to turn the gov-
ernment overto a Felix Diaz-Villa com-
bination.
Postpone Execution
Six prisoners in the Quertal, sen-
tenced to death, charged witi being
instigators of the plot to bring Felix
Diaz into power, were not shot this
morning according to schedule. The
execution has been extended pendir
further investigation, and General G'
vira stated that, although he had po
poned their execution, when it toy:
place it would be a public affair an
would serve as an example i!; uthEts.

German General Dies of Wounds -----
Amsterdanl, April r5.--Lieut.-Gen. Anmal All-Law Smoker on April 20
Gotlieb Ferdinand Forrier, of 'hc Ger- Tb.. annual All-Law smoker will be
man army, died today of wo.nds re- held at the Union on Thursday, April
ceived on the battlefield. 20. Tickets are now on sale.

D

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