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October 19, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-19

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NEWS O2HEWOLDANDJ

The

Michigan

XXVI. No. 13.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1915.

--------------

~1* 00DOGE GIV ES
' 10,000 f0ND TO
FORMAiD''LONS
4NIOR AND JUNIOR ENGINEFRS
PROFIT BY GIFT OF THE
DETROITER
ASKS REGENTS TO HOLD MONEY
Funds to be In Hands of President,
Dean and Professors at lead of
Departments
"Know all men by thest presents,
that I, John F. Dodge, of the City of
Detroit, County of Wayne, and State
of Michigan, do hereby give and do-
nate to the Regents of the University
of Michigan the sum of ten thousand
($10,000) dollars, the purpose and con-
ditions of said gift being as follows."
These were the opening words of
a deed received at the office of Dean
M. E. Cooley, of the Engineering col-
lege, yesterday afternoon when a gift
of $10,000 was received from John F.
Dodge, of Dodge Brothers Motor coin-
pany, of Detroit, the fund to be con-!
served by the regents for the purpose
of loaning to junior and senior stu-
dents in the engineeringtcollege.
"Mr. Dodge has made this gift vol-'
untarily and entirely upon his own
initiative," explained Dean Cooley in
speaking of the affair yesterday after-
noon. Some time ago the dean re-
ceived word from Mr. Dodge that he
would be glad to talk with him on
business, and it was at that time that
the big automobile manufacturer made
known his plan.
It was left to Dean Cooley to sug-r
gest suitable terms for the adminis-c
tration of the loan fund which the gift1
was to create. In explaining his mo-
tives in making such a bequest Mr.l
Dodge said: "We need engineers sor
badly today that we cannot wait for
them to earn their way through
school." It is the benefactor's plan
that the loan fund is to be used tor
assist worthy engineers who need help
to complete their college work witht
money that can be paid back afterf
graduation.
Control of the fund will be in the
hands of the president of the univer-t
sity, the dean of the college of engi-
neering and the professor at the head
of the department in which the ap-
plicant is enrolled. The monty will
be in the hands of the treasurer ofl
the university under the constant di-~
rection of the finance committee. The1
principal and interest will be loaned
to students who are juniors or seniors
in the college of engineering, not to
exceed $100 to one man per year, andl
not to exceed a total of $200 to any
one student.'
Applicants for loans from the fund
will be required to sign a note for the
amount of the loan, payable to the
treasurer of the university within twoi
years of date of graduation. The timer
may be extended at the date due ata
the discretion of the committee in1
charge. All loans shall bear interest
at the rate of five per cent from thea
date of graduation.
Providing that the fund grows int
the future to exceed the needs of itst
original purpose, the interest and such
excess shall be used to encourage re--l
search and to establish fellowships in
the college of engineering.-
REGENTS MAKE PROF. A.G. HALLt
REGISTRAR OF THE UNIVERSITYt

To Hold Present Office in College of.
Literature, Science and the r
Arts This Yehr
"Registrar of the University" is theN
new title which was conferred upon.
Prof. A. G. Hall, of the Literary col-I
lege, by the board of regents at itsI
meeting last Friday morning. The
appointment is dated October 1. In-q
formation to that effect was confirmed
last night by Regent Junius E. Beal.
Although the announcement comesf
as a surprise to the campus, it wasc
not altogether unexpected. The mat-c
ter came up for discussion at- a meet-N
ing of the executive committee of thee
regents last June, it was learned lastI
night. Final action on the appoint-
ment, however, was not taken untilI
Friday's meeting of the board.
Registrar Hall wvill still continue to1
act as registrar of the College off
Literature, Science and the Arts,

W. H. TAFT
TO SPEAK
HERE SOON
Ex-President William H. Taft will
speak in Ann Arbor either the last
^f this month or on one of the open-
ing U-:ys ~ November.
t is comig under the joint direc-
tioi c;t:.a Oa orical associatio.n and
the Woman's league, according to de-
visions made by authorities of those
two organizations today. Committees
firom the league and the association
will be appointed and hold a meeting
as sickly as possible to decide all
detalis of the undertaking.
J i auditorium will in all prob-
:aility house the lecture. Mr. Taft
will be in Saginaw, Mich., on October
25, and will stop in Ann Arbor a few
days later. The ex-president is now
professor of law at Yale university.
JAMES BI ANELL I, TO
HEAD' SENIOR LITERARM
GLAS DURING LAST YEAR
Senior. Dentals, Junior Dentals and
Junior Homeops Elect Officers;
Classes Hold Nominations
THREE ARCHITECT CLASSES
MAKE NOMINATOSS MONDAY
JUNIOR CLASSES IN LITERARY
COLLEGES POSTPONE THEIR
MEETINGS TO 3:00 O'CLOCK
James B. Angell was elected presi-
dent of the senior lit class yesterday
afternoon in Tappan hall. The other
nominees elected were: Vice-presi-
dent, Louise Potter; sectretary, Miriam
Hubbard; treasurer, Hcward Warner;,
oratorical delegate, Albert Gans; foot-
ball manager, James 'Chenot; track
manager, Wilber Broth.erton; baseball
manager, James Thouas. The office
of basketball manager will be filled by
a popular vote of the class at its next
meeting.
The junior homeops yesterday chose
the following men to conduct the af-
fairs of the class for the coming year:
President, H. F. Closz; vice-president,i
W. E. Voigt; secretary, A. E. Johnson;1
treasurer, E. Mead; athletic manager,1
C. C. Wolcott.
The senior dental class at its meet-
ing yesterday elected! the following
men: President, W. 1K. Meade; vice-
president, C. D. Cole; secretary, A. H.1
Lowther; treasurer, C. M. Rice; ath-1
letic manager, J. H. Barringer.
In the junior dental class, 0. L.i
Sutherland was elected president.
The other officers are: Vice-president,I
R. T. Getty; secretary, W. E. Higgins;
treasurer, A. B. Steele; basketball1
manager, H. B. Wright; baseball man-
ager, A. D. Honey.
Nominations for a number of the
class officers were made at meetings
held yesterday afternoon. Senior, ju-1
nior and sophomore classes in the
architectural department met, and the
list of nominees is as follows:
Senior--President, R. S. Westbrook
and A. V. Moninger; vice-president,
P. B, Cameron and A. McColl; secre-
t, W. J. Crawford' and G. Lind;
treasurer, Ringe and H. L. Corsett;
sergeant-at-arms, L. F. Voorhees; ath-
letic manager, G. B. Hammond.
Junior-President, E. H. Trysell
and F. J. Kolb; vice-president, W. A.
Bellows and M. H. Ingall; secretary,
G. L. Cheffy and G. S. Underwood;
treasurer, R. B. Frantz and C. L.
Rothrock; sergeant-at-arms, H. N.

Young and C. W. Attwood; athletic
manager, F. C. Strauss and R. L. Sat-
terwhite, Jr.
Sophomore-President, P. 0. Davis;
vice-president, H. A. Brennan and P.
B. Maher; secretary, Miss R. M. Mil-
ler; treasurer, R. L. Bauer and G. H.
Burrows; sergeant-at-arms, L. Wor-
den and P. L. Kamper; athletic man-
ager, R. Kruger and W. J. Dixon.
The classes will meet again to hold
elections Wednesday afternoon at the
following hours: Senior, at 5:15
o'clock; junior, at 4:30 o'clock; soph-
omore, at 4:00 o'clock. All meetings
will be held in room 311 of the new
engineering building. Bulletins will
be posted in the halls.
Junior engineers met last night to
hold nominations for class officers.
The list of nominees is as follows:
President, M. W. Patterson and H. L.
Carrol; vice-president, A. E. Hecker
(Continued on Page Sib)

PAQUALE AMAT
OPENS CONCRT
SEASONTONIGHT
NOTED II ALAN BARITONE WILL
BE HEARD AT HILL AUDI.
TORIUTM
TO BEGIN AT 8 O'CLOCK SHARP
Makes Special Journey from New
York to Inaugurate Pre-Fes-
tival Series
Pasquale Amato, the great Italian
baritone, will inaugurate the Choral
Union Pre-Festival Concert series in
Hill auditorium at 8:00 o'clock tonight.
This is the first opportunity that
local music lovers will have to hear
Signor Amato in a complete program,
and it will be a big event in the mu-
sical history of Ann Arbor.
The celebrated Italian has appeared
here twice before, in the May Festi-
vals of 1913 and 1914, and on each oc-
casion his success was unequalled by
any of the rival stars. His wonderful
voice, coupled with a genial person-
ality and a prepossessing appearance,
has given him precedence over any
concert singer who has ever sung in
this city.
Signor Amato is a native of Naples
and a graduate civil engineer. It was
not until after he had prepared him-
self for this profession that he began
to th nk seriously of developing the
qualities of his voice. Study in a Ne-
apolitan conservatory soon proved to
him that he was destined for an artis-
tic career, and he made his debut in
the Teatro Bellini in the city of his
birth. He was then engaged to sing
in Florence, where he remained for
three years. This was followed by
two seasons at the Teatro Costanzi in
Rome and engagements in Cairo, Al-
exandria, Buenos Ayres, Trieste, Ven-
ice, Moscow, Breslau and Leipsic. The
reputation which he had acquired by
tifs time secured for him the position
of leading baritone at the famous La
Scala theater in Milan.
In 1909 Gatti Cazzaza brought him
to New York to be the leading bari-
tone of the Metropolitan Opera com-
pany, which position he still holds.
His success was immediate and his
popularity in this country has in-
creased with each new engagement.
Signor Amato will make a special
trip from New York to fill this en-
gagement. He will spend the day in
Detroit and come to Ann Arbor late
this afternoon.
The seat sale has been remarkably
heavy. The out-of-town attendance
will be large, and in view of this fact
those who live in Ann Arbor are asked
to come as early as possible, so that
there will be no difficulty in seating
the audience before 8:00 o'clock, at
which time the concert is scheduled
to begin.
The following is the program which
Signor Amato will offer:
(a) Was ich sah,
(b) Die Alte Mutter ....... Edv. Grieg
(c) Zwei braune Augen,
(d) Ein Weib ................ Sinding

Noted Italian Baritone Singer
a
ii
PASQUALE AMATO
Who Sings in Hill Auditorium Tonight

PICK 60 MEN FOR
x1-16_GLEE CLUB
Theo. Harrison Seems Well Pleased
With Material; First Tenor
Only Part Not Filled
HOME CLIII NUMBERS 60 VOICES
"Wonderful material." That was all
Theodore Harrison would say when
questioned about the 1915-1916 Glee
club last night. Mr. Harrison has
spent three days trying out men and
he is absolutely certain that this
year's Glee club will be the best that
Michigan 'has ever boasted. More
than 150 men tried out for positions,
and from this number 60 were se-
lected. The number of men having
voices of solo and quartette caliber
was remarkable, more than 25 per
cent being rated higher than B.
First tenor is the only part that has
not been entirely filled. Anyone de-
siring to try out for this. position
should report to Mr. Harrison at the
Music school Wednesday at 4:15
o'clock. The first rehearsal will be
held at 7:10 o'clock Thursday even-
ing in the Adelphi rooms in Univer-
sity hall.
The home club will number 60
voices this year, and the first concert
will be given some time between
Thanksgiving and Christmas. Fol-
lowing are the names of those who
have been elected into the club:
Robert M. Allaw, '17L, Carroll
Bailey, '17, T. S. Barnett, '18M, Charles
Boos, '18, Harry Carlson, '17, Lyle M.
Clift, '16L, Murray Coon, '18, Dean
DeButts, '18E, R. R. Dieterle, '18,
Harold Draper, '18E, Harold Easly,
'16, Stanley Hiett, '16, Julius Fish-
bach, '17, Edwin Gordon, '17, Frank
Grover, '18, H. L. Hoag, '16, Earl F.
Hagen, '17E, Edson Hardy, '18, Rich-
ard Hardy, '17, P. A. Hartesveldt,
'17L, Arthur Heuer, '18, C. R. Illick,
'18M, W. S. James, '17, William Jen-
kins, '18L, Dwight Jennings, '16,
Lloyd Kemp, '18, Harry Kerr, '18,
William Klinesteker, '16D, Ray Koch-
er, '18, C. Lane, '16, Charles Lowes,
'16, R. B. Macduff, '17M, Don McKone,
'17, George Murphy, '16, Charles Mey-
ers, '18, George O'Connor, '18, Rodney
Parker, '16, Howard Ramsey, '17E,
Samuel Riggs, '18, C. P. Ritchie, '16,
Edwin Scarboro, '17M, Leman Scott,
'18, Donald Sissions, '17, Leonard
Siev, '17D, Prescott Smith, '18, T. H.
Sullivan, '18, C. Swarthfiquer '18,
Frederick Tinsman, '16, Ralph Vin-
cent, '17M, C. P. Watson, '18, W. Scott
Westerman, '17, U. S. Wilson, '16,
Harold Whittaker, grad, Jerome Zeig-
ler, '17, Ernest L. Zeigler, '18.

(a)
(b)
(c)

Beau soir..............Debussy
Trois jours de vendange,
Fetes Galantes........R. Hahn

(a) Lungi dal caro bene.....Secchi
(b) Nel cor piu non mi sento,
Paisiello (1741-1816)
(c) All' acquisto di gloria,
Scarlatti (1649-1728)

(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)

Viens pres de moi......Balakirew
Pendant de bal.....Tschaikowsky
Lilacs ............. Rachmaninoff
Chanson de Mephistopheles,
Moussorgsky

Intermission
(a) Just You.......... H. J. Burleigh
(b) You, My Dear.....M. W. Gallup
(c) Schlupfwinkel.... ... F. La Forge
(d) To a Messenger.
Old French songs:
(a) L'etoile de matin,
Chansonne Alsacienne
(b) Le beau jour, -
, Tambourin en rondau
(c) Me promenant un matin,
Chansonne a danser
Italian folk songs:
(a) Sona chitarra..........De Curtis
(b) Primo amore.. .........Di Jorio
(c) Tu nun me vuo chiu bene... Falvo
Mr. Giuseppe Bamboscheck at the
piano.

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