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April 01, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-01

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THE DAILY
0?$1.09 Aij
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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L'h ones :-Editorial '2414
Business 960
TELEGRIAP I SERVICE BY THE
EW YORK SUN

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VOA XXVI. No.,128.

---- --

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

MANY F[TURES ON
1916 MAY FESTVAL
CONCERT PROSGM

Schoolmasters
Close Session

Fifty-First
With

Annual Convention
Business Meetings
and Lecture.

Ends

MhORAL UNION TO GIVE
"PARADISE LOST"
SECOND DAY

BOSS'S
ON

McCORMACK, TENOR, TO SING
All-Star Cast, With Amato, atzeauer
and Kingston Will Render "Sam-
son and Delilah."
Features of exceptional interest
such as should satisfy the most diver-
gent tastes are combined in the six
programs of the 1916 May Festival.
The Choral offerings are well ar-
ranged both from the standpoint of
novelty and that of familiarity, in that
the chorus will contribute one great
modern work, "Paradise Lost" by that
splendid composer Enrico Bossi, a
work 'which has been given possibly
but once or twice in this country, and
also one of the most familiar operas
adaptable to the concert stage, Saint-
'Saen's immortal "Samson and Deli-
lah." John McCormack, the Irish ten-
or, will make his first appearance in
Ann Arbor in the fourth concert.
The children's chorus which has be-
come an important factor in the Ann
Arbor festival will appear Friday af-
ternoon, in an interesting work en-
titled "The Children at Bethlehem"
from the pen of Pierne.
The first concert will be of a miscel-
laneous nature in which the public
will have an opportunity of hearing
Miss Frieda Hempel, leading colora-
tura soprano of the Metropolitan
Opera Company, in several of her stel-
lar roles.
The second concert will bring forth
the Choral Union in the "Paradise
Lost" with four attractive soloists.
Florence Hinkle, soprano, whose suc-
cess in Ann Arbor has been duplicated
throughout the country; Sophie Bres-
lau, a leading contralto of the Metro-
politan Opera Company; Reinald Wer-
renrath, baritone, whose joint recitals
this season with Farrer have been the
sensations of the year; and Gustaf
Holmquist, a well known bass.
The third concert Friday afternoon
will bring forth the children in "The
Children at Bethlehem," at which time
Florence Hinkle will again be heard
as soloist. Sparkling orchestral num-
bers will also be heard on this pro-
gram.
Special interest, however, centers
about the fourth concert Friday even-
ing,' when John McCormack, who is
without doubt the greatest musical
idol of the day will make his first ap-
pearance in Ann Arbor in a program
specially chosen for him. McCormack
is an artist in the truest sense of the
word, and hisaappearance throughout
the country are always signals for
packed houses.
The fifth concert is bringing to Ann
Arbor one of the greatest Organ vir-
tuosos of the day, Ralph Kinder, who
is also a composer of note, whose
works are familiar to all organists.
His recital on the Frieze Memorial Or-
gan will prove to be a welcome diver-
sion.
The climax of the Festival, however,
will be reached with the sixth concert
Saturday night, when the "Samson
and Delilah" will be given with an all-
star cast. This ever popular work has
been heard in Ann Arbor on previous
occasions and its reception has been
triumphant, with Morgan Kingston.
the English tenor in the role of Sam-
son, Marga'rete Matzenauer, consid-
ered the greatest Delilah of the Metro-
politan Opera Company, and Amato
:for the High Priest, and Werrenrath
as the "Aged Hebrew," little more
could be asked for.j

Various business meetings and the
lecture on "Geographic Influence on
Japan," by Miss E. C. Semple, in the
New Science building last night closed
the fifty-first annual session of the
Schoolmaster's club yesterday.
The meeting was declared to have
been the most successful and best at-
tended of any ever held in the state.
The program was prepared under the
direction of L. P. Jocelyn, of the Ann
Arbor high school, secretary of the
organization.
A general session of the members
of the club was held yesterday morn-
ing in the New Science building at
which Professor C. H. Judd, of Chi-
cago, and Allen S. Whitney, of the edu-
cational department of this university.
spoke.
The attendance swelled to over
1,000 yesterday, but most of those at-
tending the meeting departed for their
homes on trains last evening, although
there fill be an alumnae luncheon
held in Barbour gymnasium at 12:00
o'clock today, and the second produc-
tion of the Junior girl's play will be
staged in Sarah Caswell Angele hall
at 3:00 o'clock.
M, We WELCH ELECTED
Y, M C A C,.PRESIDENT
Merle Doty, '1S, Made Vice-President,
C. W. Neumann, '18, Secretary
and Treasurer.
M. W. Welch, '17, was made presi-
dent of the University Y. M. C. A. for
the year 1916-17 at the annual elec-
tion held yesterday. Merle Doty, '18,
was chosen vice-president, and Carl
W. Neumann, '18, was elected secre-
tary and treasurer.
Acording to Philip Lovejoy, empoly-
ment secretary, the vote cast was al-
nost double that of last year.
1916 OPERA CLOSES SEASON
Sceniarios Due Monday For Next
Year's Union Production.
The 1916 Michigan Union Opera,
"Tres Rouge," finished its season last
night with a performance in the Ly-
ceum theater, Detroit. The show was
the eighth public performance of the
production, five of them having been
given at the Whitney theater here,
and one each in Toledo andtChicago
in addition to last night's perform-
ance.
Following upon the close of the 1916
season scenarios will be received until
Monday in the competition for next
year's production.
No Report Received From Urbana
No report had been received early
this morning of the result of the
Michigan-Illinois debate at Urbana
last night. The Michigan negative
team, composed of George M. Claas-
sen, '17L, Kenneth M. Stevens, '16, and
William E. Olds, '16L, opposed the
same question, that of government
ownership, which was won by the
Michigan affirmative team last night.
Pharmic Society Holds Initiation
Aristolochites, honorary pharmaceu-
tical society, has initiated the follow-
ing men: J. I. Milner, '17P, H. F. Mill-
man, '17P, W. R. Reveno, '17P, H. W.
Wickett, '17P, P. L. Atkinson, '17P and
D. Cross, '17P. The date of the initi-
ation banquet has not yet been set.
Earthquake Felt in Western Canada
Victoria, B. C., Mar. 31.-Two earth-
quake shocks were reported on the

seismograph of the observatory on
Gangle's Hill tonight. The disturb-
ance is estimated to be 300 miles away.,

MICHIGAN WINS
OVER WISCONSIN
AFFIRMIATlIV E EA3 GETS NAI-
iMITS I)ECISION IN
CONTEST
VICTORY SIXTH FOR URSITY
Question Is: "Resolved, That Govern-
in-et Should Operate Service
Corporations
Michigan defeated Wisconsin by a
unanimous decision of the judges in
the second annual Mid-West league de-
bate at Hill auditorium last night. The
debate was attended by one of the
largest audiences ever present at a
Michigan forensic contest. This 's
the sixth victory won by Michigan over
Wisconsin in the seven debates be-
tween the two universities.
Michigan upheld the affirmative on'
the question, "Resolved, that the Fed-
eral government should own and oper-
ate all public service telephone and
telegraph systems in the United States,
const'tu' o:ality waivel."
Irving S. Toplon, '17, presented the
first argument for Michigan. He out-
lined the three points that the affirma-
tive intended to prove; that private
ownership led to numerous evils, that
the government can own and operate
such systems successfully, and can
give better rates and service. Among
the evils he pointed out those of ar-
bitrary price fixing, corrupt influence
in politics through lobbies, domina-
tion of the press through advertising,
and overcapitalization with rates grad-
ed to pay dividends on watered stock.
Richard S. Munter, '16l., in the sec-
ond affirmative argument, brought out
the point that the government is com-
potent to operate these systems as
has been shown in our success in other
monopolies under its control, such as
the post office department, which is
the most efficeint in the world.
The third affirmative speaker was
William T. Adams, '17, who asserted
that profits were the motive of the
private company, and service is the
motive of the government in its en-
terprises, and that a saving of $100,-
000,000 a year would be achieved by
the elimination of advertising, lob-
bies, high salaried officials and divi-
dends, which prevail under private
ownership.
Wisconsin's negative team, com-
posed of Herman A. Zischke, Guy
Black and Forrest R. Black, though
forceful speakers, were unable to up-
hold their ideal of regulation, as the
solution of the problem. They strove
to point out that regulation is com-
paratively new in the field of telephone
and telegraph companies and success-
ful where tried, and that in compari-
son with the government operated sys-
tems in Europe the privately owned
companies in the United States proved
more successful.
Governor Edward F. Dunne, of Il-
linois, presided, and Judge J. W. Egge-
man of Fort Wayne, Ind., Prof. V. A.
Ketcham of Ohio State University, and
the Hon. T. L. Sidlo of Cleveland, act-
ed as judges. The university band play-
ed several selections before the con-
test.

Ownership IdeasI
Won D~unne Chair
Illinois (Governor Says Advocacy of
Debate Question Got IIim
%iihbernatioiial glob.
Bly It. C. L. Jacksoij
"Advocacy of the question debated
tonight made me mayor of Chicago
and governor of Illinois," declared
Governor Edward F. Dunne after the
Michigan-Wisconsin contest in Hill
auditorium last night, at which he
presided. "Advocating government
ownership of^telephones and tele-
graphs, he added, took me from the
law profession into political circles,
changing my life entirely."
"I attribute my present life to acci-
dent," he added, raising his voice as
the cheers of the elated Michigan sup-
porters sounded in the small room at
the back of the stage. "It was in Swit-
zerland that I first became interested
in this question. The direct reason
was the price of a telegram I sent
from Zurich to Lucerne, a distance of
60 miles. It cost me just eight cents.
"Upon returning to Chicago, I in-
vestigated the matter, and began to
urge government ownership. I made
a speech one evening, and was repeat
edly asked to give others of the same
nature. These speeches resulted in
my withdrawal from the legal profes-
sion."
Governor Dunne is a stocky man,
with wrinkles of -laughter about his
eyes, and a resonant voice. While he
was speaking, the lights suddenly
went out.
During this darkness, he was asked
for his opinion concerning military
training in universities. The electri-
city cane on just in time to show the
earnestness in his eyes as he said:
"I believe in compulsory military
training in state universities, because
I believe that every student owes at
least that much to the state which is
educating him."
That military training and debating
have many things in common, is the
governrr's opinion. He feels that de-
bating is to the mind what military
training is to the body. "In fact," lie
added, "debating is what might be
termed a mental gymnastic"; and
then he turned to offer congratulations
to the victorious Michigan team.
FRENCH PROFESSOR TO SPEAK
Joachim Merlant of Notpellier Uni.
versity Lectures on Monday
Prof. Joachim Merlant, of the Uni-
versity of Montpellier, France, will
deliver a lecture in French on the sub-
ject "L'Heroisme Dans la Litterature
Francaise" in the upper lecture room
of the Memorial building at 4:15
o'clock Monday afternoon.
Prof. Merlant is lecturing in this
country under the auspices of the Al-
liance Francaise, a national organiza-
tion devoted to the promotion of in-
terest in the French language and lit-
erature.
On Tuesday afternoon Mr. J. J. Al-
bert Rousseau of the architectural de-
partment will deliver a French lecture
at 5:00 o'clock in Tappan hall. Mr.
Rousseau's subject will be "L'Ecole
Des Beaux Arts de Paris."
Union Pance (liaperons Announced
The chaperons at the Union dance
tonight will be Mr. R. K. Holland and
Mrs. Holland, Mr. A. G. Ruthven and
Mrs. Ruthven.

PANCHO VILA S
FIRST ENCOUN
CAVALRYMEN

IOTIN HIP IN
TER WIT H U. 8
AT. DUE R RER O
BANITi LEAI)ER LOSES 34) MEN
AND TWO MAChINE GUNS;
AMERICAN, OSS s1GlIHT
MANY CARRANZISTAS TAKEN

Crown Prince
Renews A ttack
H eavyBattles Mark German Progress
in Western Theatre
of War
London, Mar. 31.-The crown prince.
has resumed his great drive on Ver-
dun with attacks on both sides of the
Meuse River.
The strongly fortified village of
Malancourt, 10 miles northwest of
Verdun was captured by the Germans
last night. Frontal attacks by massed
German legions drove the French-,outl
of the village, an important higgway
communication point. The Fre 'li still
hold redoubts commanding the high-
way. The Germans captured 328
prisoners.
Three heavy German infantry at-
tacks were preceded by terrific bom-
bardment from German batteries on
the heights surrounding the town.
The German war office announces that
not only the village, but French de-
fensive positions on both sides were
captured.
French experts estimate that the.
Germans have lost 20,000 men in the
renewal of the struggle about Verdun.
200 Dead in Air Raid, Says Report
Berlin, Mar. 31.-Two hundred Eng-
lish and French soldiers were killed
in a German air raid on Saloniki yes-
terday according to Berlin reports.
Numerous barrack houses were de-
stroyed by the Germans.
<Wopan Gets Sentence fo. Espionage
Berne, Switzerland, Mar. 31.-Char-
lotte von Keuhman, a New York ar-
tist, was sentenced to two months' im-
risonment and banishment on a charge
of doing secret service work for Ger-
mans in Lucerne.
WHAT'S GOING ON

11

Mexicans Flee to Moutalns Following
Rout; Said to Be Retreating
to Chihuahua
Washington, Mar. 31.-Follow-
ing Is the ofifclal report of the .
battle with Villa received at the
war department from General
Pershing at San Geronlimo, re-
layed by General Funston:
Colonel Dodd struck Villa
forces consisting of 500 men at
6:00 o'clock March 29 at Duer-
rero. Villa suffering from broken
hip and lame leg, not present
Number of Villa dead known to
be 30 and other dead supposed to
have been carried away.
Colonel Dodd captured two ma
chine guns and a large number
of horses and saddles. Our cas-
. nalties, four enlisted men wound.
ed, none seriously.
Large number of Carranga pris-
oners taken.
The attack was a surprise.
The Villa forces were driven in
a running fight 10 miles into the
mountains northwest of railroad
where they separated into small
groups.
Elisto Hernandez, Villa com-
inander, was killed.
In order to reach Guerrero,
Dodd marcied 55 miles in 17
hours, and carried on fight for
'five hours.
-.General Lopez was also
El Paso, Mar. 31.-Pancho Villa, the
Mexican bandit leader, wounded in the
hip, escaped from the United States
troops in his first clash with them on
Wednesday March 29.
Villa lot 30 men killed, two ma-
chine guns, a number of saddles, rifles
and some horses. The Americans suf-
fered to the extent of four wounded.
The Americans were commanded by
Colonel D. A. Dodd, temporary com-
mander of the second cavalry brigade
of the United States army.
Villa Limips From Field
The battle took place on the edge of
the town of Duerrero, capital of the
district dominated by Villa in the days
when as a bandit he defied for years
the forces of Porfirio Diaz. Villa was
taken from the field limping accord-
ing to report of the United States of-
ficers with Colonel Dodd and con-
firmed by Mexicans made prisoners
by the Americans.
These Mexicans claimed to be Car-
ranzistas whom Villa was holding as
prisoners for execution. They are be-
ing held for investigation as the
Amerihan officers believe that some of
them belong to the bandit 'band. All
of the prisoners are to be turned over
to the nearest Carranza commander
who will identify and dispose of them.
Surprised at Daybreak
Villa was surprised at daybreak by
the Americans. He had just captured
the town from the Carranzistas the
night befoie and was resting when the
American forces composed of the 10th
Cavalry (negro) and the 7th Cavalry,
the famous Custer regiment, swept
down upon the band and began to
pour a rain of lead into their ranks.
The American cavalry dismounted
as it dashed up within firing distance
of the camp of the bandits and leaving
their horses in charge of details crept
up on the Vilistas from arroyos and
(Continued on Page Six)

Weather for
ity-Fair and

Ann Arbor and vicin-
continued warm.

TODAY
3:00 o'clock-Junior Girls' Play,
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
7:00 o'clock - Upper Room Bible
class meets, 444 South State.
9:00 o'clock - University dance,
Packard academy."
9:00 o'clock - Michigan Union
dance, Union.
TOM1ORRO I
10:30 o'clock-Dean White speaks, I
St. Andrew's church.
6:30 o'clock-"Dad" Elliot speaks at
"Y" meeting on "The Challenge of the
Nation to the Colleges of Today," Ar-
cade theatre.
7:30 o'clock - Pres. G. Campbell'
White speaks, Presbyterian church.
7:30 o'clock-Dean White speaks,
St. Andrew's church.
8:00 o'clock-Samuel M. Levin, '12,
speaks at Menorah meeting, Newberry
hall.
U-NOTICES
All-Fresh baseball practice today
at Waterman gymnasium, 2:00 o'clock.
An exhibition of the paintings of
Betsey Graves Reyneau will be held
today from 9:00 to 6:00 at McMillan
hall. The exhibit will be open all
this week.
The Y. M. C. A. book exchange will
be open today from 11:00 to 1:00
o'clock.

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets
The Function of Doubt in Religion
Leonard A. Barrert speaks on above theme
Sunday morning 10:30
Students invited to this service and to
University Bible class at noon

SEAT SALE
U-HALL
Monday and
Tuesday

JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY

0

" THE

YANKEE

YOGIf"

Tickets on
Sale
50c and 75c

Performance for General Public

Tuesday, April 4

Sarah Caswell Angell Hall, 8 P.M.

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