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March 30, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-30

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THE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

op. fi...r.
c
4 A
I N

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAP1L SERVICE By THE
NEW YORK SUN

._ w. . _. - __ -.__..._._.._,. . - -- . _..._._. ---

VOL. XXVI. No. 126.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

VLA APPEARS I
ADVANCE OFU.S.
PURSUING FORC
BURNS RAILROAD 'BRIDGES AND
DES'T'ROI S PROPERTY 'IN
MEXICAN TOWN
PANCHO VILLA WOUNDED IN HIP
(en. Persiling on Way to New Army
Base, 120 Miles South or
Colonla D)ialan
El Paso, Mar. 29.-Villa and his
bandits appeared today at Santa Tomas
on the Mexican Northern Railroad,
half way between Madera and Chihua-
hua City.
He had passed through Santa Ca-
trina, where the American troops are
now searching. At Santa Tomas, Vil-
la burned railroad bridges and de-

r Vanden Ven
Gives Second Talk

CU OEMNSWTHl' Latin Play Ready WILSON MAY APPEAR IN CONGRESS
UUIIULI~flJILILJfor Performance
CUB OPENSI.TH .1ejoarsSmoathnesocs TO ANNOUNCE DISMISSAL OFVON
1OOATTENANE BRNSTRFF AND GERARD S RECA

It )l1 ; z,: I is aIIA 41diicturet
4ai ~~e

i l

Prof Paul Van den Ven, the noted
Belgian histarian delivered the sec-
ond of his lectures, "Byzantine Monu-
ments in Italy," in the upper lecture
of Alumni hall last night.
The lecture was profusely illustrat-
ed with lantern slides depicting the
work of the monkish artisans of the
third, fourth, and tenth centuries still
to be seen in the churches of Ravenna
and Venice.
Not the least beautiful of the slides
portrayed the mosaics begun in the
time of Theodosius, as well as the.
architecture and design of St. Mark's.
The speaker also dwelt upon the price-
less relics of ivories, enamels, and
silver and gold ornaments which of-
fer much help in compiling the his-
tory of the early Christian jehurch.

J A N V il''0IlB NT' iE.DUTC'I'QRS
PIlE"N!T FOR ANNUAL
'ONFERENC ES
DISCUSS FREE HAND DRAWINGS
Dr, aie P' . Ihaley to $peak on "Arit
>iead Iha y. "The Stranger"
The fifty-first meeting of the Michi-
gau Schoolmasters club opened its an-
nual meeting yesterday with a larger
registration ;or the first day than it
has ever had before. It is expected
that the attendance will increase to
1 ,(00 today.

stroyedc
There
the vicin
received
vance tr
behind.
ADD1TI
Colum
General
the the.
tonight
base. 12
lan. He
Additi
for thef
follow ing
America
Fifty-:
were sen
tal tonig
the poor
tions in3
WOUND
El Pas
wounded
ing with
(C,
t r
Dentist's
See

Manypromnenteducators will be
other property.
were no American troops in ,ri troCionference, among
city, according to the messages whoATE7 are: Dr. James '. Haney, of
here tonight. Pershing's ad-r New York; Prof. Van den Ven, of the
roops are reported two daysAu Iliversity of Louvain, Belgium, Dr.
L . E. A. Loew, of Oxford University. Eng-
A-- land. Dr. George 11. Allen of Berlin
ONAL C AVALRY TO FRONT . .,,.
bus, New Mexico Mar. 29. ic n etiveectsGermany, and Prof. 1-. C. if. Judd, of
J. J. Pershing, commanding ll ard Fight 11iIh the University of Chicago. The gen-
A a yoIli eral meetings will be open to the pub-
--- lie but the conferences are limited in
on his way to the new army 0aaE i1r ll" , M Y PRIZE ttendance.
a left the front last night. - Dr. Jan' P. Haney, who is director
nal cavalry left here today The ichigan debating team which of drawing in the High Schools of
front to re-enforce the troops takes the negative against the Uni- New Yorl,. will speak on the subject,
gVila in hs reeathfrom I versity of Illinois toamorrow night i \"Art in H1arness" in the New Science
the second annual Alid-West league uilding at f:15 this morning. Free
six soldiers from the front triangular debate on the question: hand drawing will be the topic of the
t to dtheEl Paso base hospi- Resolved, that the Federal govern- e ra discussion for the first time
nt They were made sick by ment should own and operate all pub- in the history of the Schoolmasters'
vate lic service telephone and telegraph orgav , ization. The program was ar-
wexicon systemis in ithe United States," leaves ranged as a result of the recent lee-
today at 1:17 o'clock on the uichiga tu's in favor of this branch in com-
)EID BANDIT CHIEF HIDIN(t Central for Urbana. rolessor t I. mon education by Dr. Eliot,. president-"
so, Ma. 29.--Pancho Villa was T. Hollister, of the oratory departm d emrit us of !i arvard, Dr. McCracken,
in, Ma ip. 29-Pn h Vig- was will accompany the team. of e l(,J ey and llrofe.or Suzzalo.
in the hip during the fight- Michigan won in the first contest i e erlv part of his address, Dr.
,the American soldiers aftert!< r prtohiadesD.
o tl~ined on Pae Six) between the two universities last iear i innelc. . i l read his miracle play,
when the Mid-Wes league w«° irA "e S rane. His lecture will be
l'orned. Both illinois and Wiscoisi1 be' on art a uid industrial education
AEW I[OAEtlietinird university ilthe leagm, in Germnv and will be illustrate
'LINE 9S ~~withd(rew rrom a quinta sular lcague ih ]Si, .E'011; 1 1nview,
with Nebraska, Iowa and Minnesota
to form the new association. Because The program for today also includes
of the stiff fight that Illinois gave here a tolk on "'What the High Schools of
last year a hard contest is expected. the U nited States are Domg in Art
5Guilt Now Well Established; The final head-on between Michi- Instruction," by Royal Bailey Far-j
ek Embalmer i Black- gan's afirmati've and negative teams nu - supervisor of drawing and in-

Everything is in readiness for the
"Menaebhmi," the Latin play to be
staged in University hall at 8:00
o'clock this evening. The last rehears-
al went off with so great smoothness
that the production tonight is sure to
be a success.
Under the direction of Pauline O.
Emerson, '16, and Prof. Herbert A.
Kenyon, of the department of ro-
mance languages, the play has been
staged as it was when it was first
acted in 215 B. C. Under the direc-
tion of Prof. Orma F. Butler, of the
Latin department a careful study has
been made of the Pompeiian wall
paintings, miniatures, manuscripts of.
Terence and other original specimens
of Roman actors' costumes, and the
effort has been to follow these orig-
inals closely both in line and color.
The staging of the production alone
will be of invaluable information to
rtachers and instructors of the Latin
language and Roman and ancienthis-
tory. The sale of tickets has ex-
ceeded all expectations and the seats
have been limited in number in order
that all attending may be assured suit-'
able seats.
"YANKIEYOGIE91, JUNIOR
GIRLS PLAY SUCCESSFUL
First Production, Given in honor of
Seniors, shows Energy of
Third Year Women
"The Yankie Yogie," twelfth annual
play given by the Juniors in honor of
the Seniors last night, went off with-
out a hitch.
To Miss Ruth Lenzer, the writer of
the book, belongs the credit for the
absorbing and amusing plot, while the:
songs, written by Olga Shinkman, Jo-
sephine Randall, and Christine String-
er are sure to be popular. The scene
is st in Japan, which forms a charm-
ing background for the ,romance of
Prince Kosa, and Princess Asaya, as
well as that of Richard Brown of Ann
Arbor and his fiancee, Mary.
'Miss Ruberta Woodworth was excel-
lent as the hero, who, in a series of
mishaps, was forced to take the place
of the priest, the %Yogi, thus giving
the title to the play. The entire cast
was well chosen, and beside Miss
Woodworth as Richard, Olive Hartzig
as Mary, Inez Gose as Asayo, and An-
ita Kelley as the priest deserve special
inention for the splendid way in which
they entered into their parts. The
choruses also did fine work.
The success of the play was due in
large part to Professor Brumm's faith-
ful work in training the girls.
FOREIGNERS GUESTS OF UNION

*
BOIL THE WATER!
* oil the water! This ac
* is given by the Water Bi
x Though the city officials giv
'surances that the water is
es tly safe to drink in itsI
enct condition, yet as a m<
*of precaution they recom
that this step be taken for
Cavs at least.
1*
* * . * * * * * * *
CITIZENS SPLIT
ON CHARTER FP

aar
e a:
pre
att
men
rtwv

* *
*
*
d*
s-*
s- *
S-.
*j
o*
*
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* *

RECENT VIOLATIONS

*

'LA NI

s* ,- * r~s i a r r a aa~ sw w

WOSEUR }[71) OUTLINE EFFOA' RTS T
SECUtRE iNTERNATIONAL LAW
OBSERVATIION

Civic Association Supports Maniaiger
Idea;* Granger, City Clerk, iI
Active Opposition
_0 -
ELECTION MONDAY IMPORTANT
With election day coming next Mon-
day, the opponents and proponents of
the charter revision proposition, which
is the point drawing the chief amount
of attention, are lining up preparatory
to a big fight. Although the city niana-
ger plan of government, which is the
bone of contention, does not come up
directly at this time, it is thought that
the attitude of the voters April 3 will
have a lot to do with -the final decision
of the charter revision commission.
The Civic association, in backing up
the city manager plan, is pointing to
the present inefficiency of city man-
agement, and is declaring that the
joining of all department heads into
one body and under one direct man-
agement will mean both administrative
and financial gain. Especially does
(Continued on age Six)

F

WHAT'S GOING ONJ

mail Matter
New York, Mar. 29.-The guilt of
Dr. Arthur Warren Waite is so well
established in the judgement of Dis-
trict Attorney Swann, established not
merely by a well linked chain of cir-
cumstantial evidence but by confes-
sions which were curiously amplified
today, that the investigation is now
turning to indications of blackmail
and conspiracy.
The person most wanted in this con-
nection is Eugene Oliver Kane, em-
balmer for John S. Potter, of the
Plowright Undertaking establishment,
who was accused of receiving $9,0001
for agreeing to doctor specimens of
embalming fluid with arsenic, and to
swear that arsenic was used in em-
balming the body of John E. Peck.
The disappearance of Kane made
necessary in Judge Swann's opinion
long and detailed questioning of Kane's
employer, John S. Potter, as to whe-
ther or not Waite had told the truth in
that Potter was aware of the scheme
to save Waite's life by putting ar-
senic in the embalming fluid. .1

was held last night. Both teams seem
well prepared for their contests.
The six men comprising the two teams
will each receive the Gray prize of
$50, which is given each year to the
men on the Mid-West teams. This
prize was established last year when
the league was formed, and is pa id
from the interest on $10,000 principal,
The men who will leave for Urbais
are as follows: George C. Claassen,
'17L, of Grundy Center, Iowa, who was1
a member of last year's Varsity team
which defeated Wisconsin; William E.
Olds, '16, of Flint, Mich., and Kenneth
M. Stevens. '101, Detroit, Mich.. who
was alternate on last year's varsity
team.
Crosby Talks on 1Fledire Furnace s?
Mr. E. L. Crosby, sales engineer of
the Detroit Edison company, gave a
talk yesterday morning in the cheo s-
try building on "Electric Furnaces.
The lecture was before the class in
chemical engineering. lie described
briefly the development of this im-
portant type of furnce and the vaow-i
otis kinds now in use.

duustrial training for the state of New
'ork .Ap aicr on the "Drawing In-;
stinct of Primitive Man" by Profes-
sor ilortimer K. Cooley. of the engi-
neering college, will be read at the
general session this morning in the
New Science building.

EVENTS OF THE DAY FOR
THE SCHOOLMASTERS
9:15 o'clock-Dr. James P.
Haney and Prof. Royal B. Far-
num will speak in auditorium,
New Science building.
2:00 o'clock-Dr. Haney and
Prof Farnum, will speak at Art
conference, room A, Alumni hall.
4:15 o'clock-Dr. E. A. Loew
will deliver a stereopticon lec-
ture Alumni Memorial hall.
Many departmental conferences
are also scheduled to be held.
* * * * * * * * * *m *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
A
:
*z
*
:F

Open to

"(et Together" Affair Tonight
Entire Student Body

FELLOWSHIP MEN SELECTED
(oni uiitt' Chooses Competitors;; 'No
Names Announced at Present
Acording to an announcement given
out -by Professor Geo. W. Dowrie yes-
terdaY, the men who are to compete
for the business fellowships given by
the National City Bank, were chosen
enday by a committee selected from
the members of the faculty of the
economics departmrent.

"Cosmopolitan Night," an informal
reception tendered to all the foreign
students of the campus by the Union
will be held this evening at the Union
at 7:30 o'clock. The entire student
body is invited to attend as this is a
"get acquainted" function. An excel-
lent musical program has been plan-
ned which will include the fresh glee
club, native Zulu songs by A. A. Seele,
'18D, W. F. Crockett's ukelele quartet
and songs by A. R. Melcher, '18D, and
Carlos Zanelli, '17R
Announce Inlander Business Staff
Hugo Wagenseil, '16, business man-
ager of the Inlander, Michigan's new
literary magazine, made public the
appointment of his assistants yester-
day. The following have been chosen:
Kenneth Keyes, '17, and R. C. Patter-
son, '18. There is a splendid oppor-
tunity for any students wishing to

Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Cloudy; probably snow or rain,
with moderate north-east winds.
TODAY
9:00 o'clock-Soph engineering as-
sembly, room 348, eng. building.
10:00 o'clock-Junior engineering
assembly, room 348, eng. building.
11:00 o'clock-Senior engineering as-
sembly, room 348, eng. building.
5:00 o'clock - Delta Sigma Rho
meets, Oratory room in north wing.
5:30 o'clock-Lyceum club meets,'
Oratory room in north wing.
5:30 o'clock - Men's Educational
club holds banquet, Baptist church.
7:30 o'clock-Christian Science so-
ciety meets. Newberry hall.
7:30 o'clock-Cosmopolitan club re-
ception, Michigan Union.
8:00 o'clock-Latin Play, "Menaech-
mi," University hall.
TOMORROW,
2:00 o'clock-Soph lit Shook party,
Armory.
5:00 o'clock-Senior architects' meet,
312 new eng. building.
6:30 o'clock-Alma college club ban-
quet, Newberry hall.
7:30 o'clock-Jeffersonian society
meets, Jefferson hall.
7;30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster hall.
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, U-
hall.
8:00 o'clock-Mid-west debate, Wis-
consin vs. Michigan, Hill auditorium.
8:00 o'clock - Annual senior law
"Crease dance," Granger's.
9:00 o'clock--Shook party, Michi-
gan Union.
U-N OTICES
At the Junior Engineers' assembly
today plans will be discussed to col-
,lect class dues.
9:00 to 6:00 o'clock, exhibition of
he paintings of Betsy Graves Reyneau,
McMillan hall. The exhibit will be
open all this week.
There will' be no meeting of the
Poetry club this evening on account
of the Latin Play.

Only Complete Abandontent of Ger-
man Campaign Against .Mer-
cliaintmen Can Avoid Measure
Washington, Mar. 29.-The United
States is perilously close to a break
in diplomatic relations with Germany,
according to the belief of officialdom
tonight.
So often has the cry of "Wolf" been
raised that the public has become cyn-
ical, even indifferent in every new
crisis that has arisen.
It can be stated positively, however,
in view of the destruction of unarmed
merchantmen in the German war zone
about the British Isles, that the Presi-
dent has made up his mind to ap-
pear before Congress, recite the ef-
forts he has made to secure observ-
ance of international law, the assur-
ances given him by the German gov-
ernment and the violations of Amer-
ican rights and these assurances by
German submarines, and announce his
purpose to recall Ambassador Girard
and dismiss Count von Bernstorff, the
Germ h ambassador.
Thee drastic measures can be avoid-
ed only by the complete abandonment
by Germany of her campaign against
merchantmen.
The President's decision is based
upon the sinking of the steamers Sus-
sex, the steamer Englishman, and the'
steamer Manchester Engineer.
Ambassador Girard has been directed
ro ascertain if the German government
has any information in regard to the
attacks on the three vessels named.
BRITISH ' EAISHIP TORPEDOED
Washington Mar. 29.-Consul Frost
at Queenstown cabled the State de-
partment this afternoon that the Brit-
ish steamship Eagle $Ioint, with one
or more Americans on board, had been
torpedoed by a submarine. An official
statement from the State department,
lased on the consul's dispatch, stated
that the Eagle Point was torpedoed
without warning 100 miles from land,
that all on board were saved, and
among the survivors was one American
citizen.
UPPER PENINSULA MEN MEET
Hughitt Discusses Athletics; Plan Re-
union and Banquet in Marquette
"Upper Peninsula men could ^and
should lead in University athletics,"
said Tonmy Hughitt at the Upper Pen-
insula club meeting at the Union last
night. Hughitt prophesied future
achievements for Upper Peninsula
men if they only will work. He urged
the men now in the university to per-
suade new material to come to Michi-
gan.
Professor W. D. Henderson spoke
on "The Upper Peninsula as a Lower
Peninsula Man Sees It," reviewing the
work done in the Upper Peninsula by
the extension course of the univer-
sity.
Louis Reimann, 16, student Y. M.
C. A. president, told of the very im-
portant part the Upper Peninsula
plays in university life.
R. L. Finch, '17, presented plans for
a grand reunion and banquet to be
held this summer in Marquette.
The social committee announced a
club dance for Friday, April 7, at
Granger's, and a dinner to be held af-
ter spring vacation.
Musical entertainment was furn-
ishedl LeRoy Scanlan, ',,L,'ant.w.
A. Fort, '17M, ragtime pianists.

J-Engineers to Vote on Honor System
The final vote on the honor system
will be taken at the junior engineer
assembly at 10:00 o'clock today in
'oom 348 of the Engineering building.

TIe nam's of ulhe nmten will not be try out for positions on the staff.
'-mnounced m uniil the clay they -go to
'hicago to confer with the represen- Enein(t'u Latin Expert Gves Lecture
tatives of the bank. In the original Dr. E. A. Loew, one of the most emi-
Irrangements with the bank,' the men nent of the younger scholars in the
who were selected by the University field of palaeography, and a specialist
were to meet their representatives at in the reading of . Latin manuscripts,
Chicago on April 1. This meeting has delivered an illustrated lecture on
been post poned, however, until a later "The Oldest Latin Manuscripts," in
date, which has not yet been decided Alumni Memorial hall yesterday before
upon. . about 150 persons.

Who meet Illinois in the Wid-West League I1eate at Urbana tomorrow
night,

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