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March 29, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

* * * * *

F THE THEA
TODAY
[ajestic --Marguerite
"Widow by Proxy:"
Lreade - George Be
;wn of Fate."
rpheum-"The Life
riour."
* * * * * * *

* * * *
*
TERS
*
*
Fields *
*
ban in *
of Our *
*
*
* * * *

At the Whitney
'ry Lauder, when he appears at
Whitney Theater, Wednesday,
5, will bring with him not only
ride of having been one of the
pal artists to sing before King
e and Queen Mary at the "Com-
Performance" at the Palace
er, London, two years ago, but
he feeling that he did something
Ip his particular friends. His
:ular friends are donkeys and
md ponies. Lauder was a "pit
in a coal mine during his youth,
e became very fond of the pony
vas in his charge. Since he be-
famous he has lost none of his
st in the animals. So, when
ey day" was celebrated in
pool, England, Lauder not only
his presence but his energies to
ng the day mean something
than a passing event.
mkey day" had been planned by
lackpool local committee of the
ty for Prevention of Cruelty to
ails, and prizes were prepared
he best behaved and the best
rg little animals that give pleas-
> the children on the sands.
Punker Bean" at the Whitney
s Majesty Bunker Bean," a new
dy , will be the attraction at the
ney theatre for one performance,
hursday'evening, April 6, coming
direct from a sensationally suc-
hl engagement of six months at
ort theatre, Chicago, with Taylor
tes as the star and the original
any intact, in his support. The
dy Is by Lee Wilson Dodd and is
k on the stories of the same name
arry Leon Wilson which ran as a
J a -short time ago in the Satur-
Evening Post. Mr. Holmes, the
g comedian who is beingtstarred
oseph Brooks, will be " seen in
itle role, Bunker Bean.
the war in Europe had not broken
'Maid in America," the great New
Winter Garden Revue, coming
e Whitney .theatre Thursday,
h 30, might be without one of its
valuable entertainers, Minerva
rdale, the dainty soubret to. Miss
rdale had signed a contract with
George Edwardes for a London
ucion, but, when war was declar- eie htsewudb
,* deed that she woul e~dd
t°'aer ob-her own shores and so
ame back to her native land. She
ust made an emphatic success at
ollies Bergere in Paris when she
.ed the London engagement. Now
is glad that she came back to
rotection of the Stars and Stripes.
part in "Maid in America," the
er Garden spectacle that is her-
as the largest and loveliest of
}anter Garden series, is more suit-
> her peculiar personality than
iing he, has previously interpret-
At the Majestic
other large and enthusiastic an-
:e signified their approbation of
eting of Marguerite Fields & Co.,
. they appeared in that New York
ss, "The Common Law." The
tility of the company was dem-
-ated in the comedy portions, and
lay was well acted throughout.
is afternoon and tonight, "A
w by Proxy" will be the attrac-
This three-act farce contains
laughs in its hundred and fifty
tes than did "A Pair of Sixes,"
ull House," "Twin Beds," and "It
to Advertise" combined, wrote a
York critic when May Irwin pre-
d "A Widow by Proxy" in New
City.
at about tells the story. Miss

.s plays Miss Irwin's part and
s herself a comedienne of rare
r-and also shows three very ex-
onal gowns. If you don't like
ugh, don't come. The Melancholy
s, the Gloom Sisters and the Blue
hers are especially invited to stay
Return of Unsold Play Tickets
1 persons holding Latin Play
ts which they have not sold are
ested to return them to the desk
he main corridor of University
this afternoon as the large de-,
d for tickets requires that the sale
ited.
Ak over the advertizements. They
interest you. **
Ak over the advertizements. They

FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF
OUR GI 1ESTSI THEE SCHOOL-
MASTERS OF MICHIGAN
Wednesday, March 29.
2:00-Classical Conference, Al-
umni Memorial Hall.
4:00 o'clock-Dr. E. A. Loew
gives an illustrated lecture on
"Mediaeval Repositories of
Learning," Upper lecture room.
Memorial Hall.
5:30 o'clock-Informal recep-
tion of members of the School-
inasters' cl) at the Union,
6:00 o'clock-Principals' ban.
quet at ihe Union.
8:15 o'clock-Prof. Paul V~ain
den Voen delivers an il istrated
lecture on 1 yzaUtilO Monii-
nieuts of Italy." Upper lecture
roon, Aluniii Mlmnria lhall.
Thursday, March 0
9:15 c'&ock-Geni'al sesson
address. New Science Building
12:00 o'clock -Mathematic
luncheon, Newberry hall.
12:30 o'clock-Biological lun-
cheon, iBotanical laboratory, New
Science building.
1:30 o'clock-- Physics and
chemistry conference, Chemical.
laboratory.
1:30 o'clock-Biological confer-
ence, New Science building.
2:00 o'clock-Classical confer-
.ence, Alumni Memorial hall.
2':00 o'clock-Modern language
conference, room 20, University
hall.
2:00- o'clock-History confer-
ence, Room C-3, High School.
2:00 o'clock-Art conference,
room A, Alumni Memorial hall.
2:00 o'clock-Home Economics
conference, room B-1, High
School.
2:00 o'clock-Conmmercial con-
ference, room B-8, High School.
2:00 o'clock-Educational psy-
chology conference, auditorium,
of New Science building.
3:00 o'clock - Mathematical
conference, auditorium, New Sci-
once building.
4:00 o'clock-Young ladies'
gymnastic demonstrations and
games, Barbour gymnasium.
4:15 o'clock-Dr. E. A. Loew
delivers a stereoptican lecture in
Memorial Hall.
4:15 o'clock-Michigan inter-
scholastic athletic association,
room B-8, High School.
8:00 o'clock-Latin Play "Men-
aechmi" with musical settings,
University hall.
Friday, March4 1
9:00 o'clock-General session
and business meeting, auditorium
of New Science building.
1:30 oclock-Physiograph con-
ference, roomn 217-G, New Science
building.
2:00 o'clock-Classical confer-
ence, Alumni Hall.
2:00 o'clock-Modern language
conference, room 203, University
hall.
2:00 o'clock-English confer-
ence, auditorium of the High
School.
2:00 o'clock-Historical con-
ference, room C-3, High School.
2:00 o'clock - Mathematical
conference, Tappan hall.
2:00 o'clock - Physics and
chemistry conference, Physical
laboratory.
2:00 o'clock-Biological confer-
ence, New Science building.
2:00 o'clock-Manual Training,
roofn C-1, High School.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of presi-

dents of federation clubs.
4:15 o'clock-Address on "Bar-
rier Boundaries in the Present
War," auditorium, New -.Science
building.
8:00 o'clock--Illustrated lec-
ture on "Geographic Influence on
Japan," auditorium, New Science
building_.
Saturday, April 1
12:00 o'clock-Alumni recep-
tion and banquet, Barbour gym-
nasiumn.
2:30 o'clock-Junior Girls'
Play, Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

Owing to the engagement of ?Miss
Leonora.Allen with the Minneapolis
Symphony Orchestra, it has been nec-
essary tochange the date of the next
concert of the University Symphony
Orchestra to Wednesday, Aprii 5, in-
stead of April 6 as was previously an-
nounced.
Three soloists will appear with the
orchestra at this time. Miss Leonora
Allen, soprana, whose rare appear-
ances on the Ann Arbor concert stage
have been greeted with unfailing en-
thusiasm, will sing Delibes' "The
Maids of (adiz." Mr. Earl V. Moore
will phiy' r uboi "F:ntasie Tiomp-
alS', (711'' o 1 1 New
a'terks ,or , og0' - iii; C :wha. 1 ':1s l (
,C,) pa 'i;:mjt; an Mr. Nicolo Far- c
will play Weber's reirehing; "(oin-
certlno" for the (larinet.
Svnons Syiphonyf in major,
a c:urioaly nogleced work of piqnuant
beauty and dramatic intensity, will
bring the program to a close; and it
is expected that its performance will
epitomize not only the progress which
the orchestra has made in recent
years, but the surprising degree o:'
excellence to which a sincere love of
music and a serious, practical inter-
est on the part of the members may,
bring a purely "amateur" orchestra.
A dhertizers in The 31 ichigall i):ly
are the r liable busnhes8 utenl of the
city. It is to your interest to trade
with them. **

VIOLENT OFFENSIVES ON
FRONT S OCCUR DURING
SEVEN DAYS.

ALL
PAST,

Germans have continued attacks on
the French battle front, marked es-
pecially by furious fire of heavy guns,
and the Russians have resumed a
violent offensive over more than a
hundr ed miles of the eastern front,
intended probably to draw off Ger-
mans :rom the Verdun attack. These
are the main battlefield headliners of
the past several (lays. But the field
of geniiernl diplomnatic relations has
been ii d up stringently by the sink-
ing of1':i Bi'tih hships Sussex and
EnglIslmlnl:t u, w h ichl carrie(1 AmiericanfL
passzen s a ooaI'd. The Mexican
question is s1ll holding fire, and the
course that the Carranza troopers will
follow is still a burning one.
The Germans have kept up violent
assaults on the lines of the French,
especially west of the Meuse. They
have come within about four miles of
the Paris-Verdun railway, which
seems to be an objective. Numerous
reports state that the city of Verdun is
in flames in many parts. British at-
tacks farther west resulted in the
gaining of a few hundred yards of
trenches, but numerous French coun-
ter attacks on various partso of the
line were on the whole unsuccessful.
Russians trying to repeat the manoeu-
vers of 1914, when they drew off the
German campaign toward Calais, began

RBEVIEW Of WEEK'S WAR

recently a general offensive on most
of the eastern fronts, especially to the
south of Riga and in Bessarabia. The
results of these battles have contra-
dictory reports in the Petrograd and
Berlin offices. Russians have also oc-
cupied Ispahan, in a part of Persia
generally conceded as being under
the sphere of influence of Great
Britain. Russians are besieging Tre-
bizond.
In the field of diplomacy, the situa-
tion is tied up by the deliberations re-
sulting from the sinking of two British
ships in the channel, and the probable
loss of several American lives. Wash-
ington authorities propose to await
further proof before assuming that
the sinking was by German submarine.
MNit, 12 OF TOL EDOIES.,
1) AUG ilTE R OFl 'ROF. D)1 ST Ei i

Geology, and geography will, be fea-
tures of the i2st annual meeting of the
Michigan Academy of'Science here
today. Between 9:00 o'clock in the
morning and 1:30 o'clock in the after-
noon six lectures will be given.
Mr. E. C. Case is the first speaker,
on the subject of "A Conception of
Paleogeography." The other speakers
are: Prof. W. H. Hobbs on "The Ex-
tremes of Mountain Glacial Erosion;
Frank Leverett, on "Underground
Water ('oniitions at the Steere Farm;"
G. M. Eihlers on "Observations on
:i:in Pi' -oic Corals in the Ro-
ni'e ('lh'l n;" Frank Leverett on
re-gamiz Glacial Lake in North-
emr Mi<nisol;" and Prof. E. H.
-aus aiid A. 3. Peck on "The Crys- -
Stallograpljy ot Anglesite from the Tin-
tie District, U4ah.'

E iOLOAISTS G IVE LE
Six e tuires Will Be iven
SAcademy of Seknce e4

Word has been received in this iy
of the death of Mrs. C. 0. Lasley of)
Toledo, Ohio. Mrs. Lasley was V'
well known to the residents of thli,
city as Bessie Dunster, the daughtei
of the late Professor Edward S. Dun-
ster- of the Medical school of this
university.
The death came as a surprise. Mrs.
Lasley had been ill only four days
with what appeared to be a nervous
breakdown. She is survived by her
husband, two sons, and two sisters:
It is possible that the body will be
brought here for burial although no
defipite plans have as yet been an-
nounced.

at

arsity [and ReheaIrses This Evening
A rehearsal of the Varsity band will
he held at 7:00 o'clock tonight in
University hall. At this meeting the
final touches will be put on the -selec-
tions which that organization is to give
at the Michigan-Wisconsin debate Fri-
Fry night. 11 those having money
for tickets sold for the last Band.
ol-ounce are requested to turn it in
tonight. -

Patronize Michigan Daily A
ers.

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W HIRLWIND CLEARANCE

IS TAKING PLACE AT

I

GRINNELL BROS.GREAT

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It's Pianos that Make You Proud to Own
You have no time to lose. Every day means just so many
of these great bargains sold. If you will come to our store
you will soon realize what this great offer places within
your reach. No matter what we would say in print could
not commence to picture this great savings event and what
it means to you.
OU MUST SEE THEM
These Pianos in this sale carry names that are known the
world over., Pianos that have stood the test for scares of
years. Everybody knows t h e y are the
World's Best
INVESTIGATE! COMPARE VALUES!
Extra Special Terms to Suit You
OPEN EVERY EVENING
Gri nell B-ros

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$245

PLJ1AYER
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$315
$365
$395

UPPER PENINSULA CLUB
TO IIOLD SMOKER TONIGHT
Upper Peninsula club will hold a
smoker at the Union at 7:30 o'clock
this evening. Speakers for the even-
ing will be Prof. W. D. Henderson,
Tommy Hughitt, and R. S. Finch, '16.
Music for the occasion will be fur-
nished by LeRoy J. Scanlan, '16L, and
the campus string quartet.
The club plans to make itself instru-
mental in influencing upper penin-
sulr men into coming to Michigan,
and in that way make its influence felt

116 S. Malin St.

Ann Arbor, Mich.
Phone 1707

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