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March 29, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-29

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THE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS
VOL. XXVI No. 125.

OP.
AdHMWD
,t
AN

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

___ -- - . .-

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 1916.

PRICE FIVE C

._...

SH LAUNCH
HEAV OFENSIV
VERDUN SITUATION REMAiNS
UNCHANGED: RUSSIANS
REPULSED
GERMANS SUFFER BIG LOSSES
British Report Successful Air Attack
on Turk Base 100 Miles East
of Suez Canal
Berlin, March 28.-The fighting
around St. Eloi, where the British
launched heavy attacks againit the
German lines, is developing into
what may prove to be a strong enemy
offensive, the war department re-
ported this afternoon. The British
are continuing their attack, although
they have made no further important
gain.

PROFESSOR VAN DEN YEN
GiES ILLUSTRATE TALK

Foreign Professor Lectures on
and Second Fall of
Constantinople

First

Prof. Paul Van den Ven, a native of
Belgium, and member of the faculty
of the University of Louvain, lately
lecturer at the Universities of Cam-
bridge and Glasgow, and at present
connected with Princeton University,
yesterday lectured on "The First and
Second Fall of Constantinople" in the
upper lecture room of Memorial hall.
The lecture was illustrated by more
than 50 slides of remarkable clearness
and beauty.
Prof. Van den Ven spoke at some
length upon the siege of the city of
Constantinople by the Crusaders in
1204 and by the Turks in 1456. He
described the priceless works of art
which had been collected there, and
how these were ruthlessly destroyed
by the conquerers or sent to the melt-
ing pot. The great towers in which
was stored the huge tribute of silks,
gold, silver and precious stones were
sacked and the plunder divided among
the spoilers.
Prof. Van den Ven concluded by say-
ing that these two calamities were to
be reckonedhas two of the severest
blows that had ever befallen human-
ity and civilization.
Ade'phiansgive
LifePreserver,

It is thought possible here that
British troops taking advantage of
the improved weather conditions on
this sector may be planning a drive
aiming to force the withdrawal of
German troops from Verdun. The
situation around Verdun and in the
whole region between the Meuse and
Moselle remains unchanged.
Russians Repulsed
On the eastern front the Russians
continued their attack last night in
the region of Postawy, but without
results. The Germans repulsed the
Russian attempt to reconquer posi-
tions taken in last Sunday's fighting
near Lake Narocz.
Nothing New on Meuse
The war office statement today
says, "On the western front lively
fighting at close quarters developed
south of St. Eloi around mine craters
formed by explosions of British
mines. The action has extended to
adjacent lines. On both sides of the
Meuse, where fighting istaking place,
there is nothing new to record.
GERMANS LOSE HEAVILY
Paris, March 28.-A bombardment
of great violence against the French'
positions from Avoncourt to Bethin-
coirt west of the Meuse was followed
this afternoon by a German attack
which was launched against the Hau-
court-Malancourt front in successive
waves. It was repulsed with heavy
losses according to the official state-
ment issued by the French war office
tonight.
BRITISH RAID TURKS
London, March 28.-A successful
aero raid on the Turkish advance base
at Bir-el-Hassanah, 100 miles east of
the Suez Canal, is reported in a dis-
patch from Suez. The raid was made
by British air men March 24. Forty
bombs were dropped on the Turkish
camp which was set on fire. Other
bombs hit the reservoir and buildings
recently erected by the Turks.
COSM OPOLITES TO STAGE
NOVEL AFFAIRTOMORROW
Elaborate Musical Program to Feature
Informal "Cosmopolitan
Night"
Cider, cigarettes and song will mark
the annual "Cosmopolitan Night" to
be held at the Union tomorrow even-
ing, accroding to plans announced yes-
terday by the committee in charge.
At 7:30 o'clock the doors of the
Union will be thrown open to the en-
tire body of Michigan men, who will
act as hosts to the combined foreign
students' clubs.
The reception will be very informal,
and will be rather in the nature of a
"get acquainted" night for all con-
cerned. An elaborate musical. pro-
gram has been provided which will
include a shadow boxing contest by
Ho Lee, '17A, Zulu native songs by
A. A. Seele, '18D, and songs by A. R.
Melcher, '18D, and Carlos Zanelli,
'17E. W. F. Crockett, '16, will play the
ukelele.
Tomorrow night's reception will be
the first opportunity afforded this year
for university men to get in touch
with members of the foreign students'

House of Representatives Votes
Give $12.00 in Equipment to
Boat Club Treasurer

to

Adelphi House of Representatives
unanimously voted through a bill at
the regular business session last
night, appropriating money for one
life preserver and another equivalent
amount to be used for river safety
devices as the Boat club sees fit. The
whole appropriation, amounting to
twelve dollars, will be turned over to
the treasurer of the Boat club.
The Adelphi was the first organiza-
tion to put itself on record as sup-
porting any feasible safety campaign
which the Boat club should bring for-
ward for safe-guarding the Huron
river. The actual pledging of the
money is only one in a series of simi-
lar appropriations being made this
past week by various other campus
societies.
Select Officials
iFor Big Debate

ARREST EMBALMER
AS ACCOMPUCE OF
ALI.EGED POISONER CONFESSES
HE PAID $9,000.00 AS
BRIBE
GAVE MONEY ONE WEEK AGO
Oliver Kane, Who Prepared Peck's
Body for Burial, Was to Swear
le Used Arsenic
New York, Mar. 28.-District At-
torney Swann himself and members
of the staff and detectives tonight went
to the home of Oliver Kane, an em-
balmer, at 427 West 57th street, to
arrest Kane on a charge of having
accepted from Dr. Arthur W. Waite
a week ago, $9,000 in cash to swear
in case of Dr. Waite's arrest and trial
for the murder of John E. Peck, that
Kane, who prepared the body of Mr.
Peck for burial in Dr. Waite's apart-
ments, had used arsenic in the em-
balming fluid.
Dr. Waite told District Attorney
Swann late this afternoon at Bellevue,,
in answer to Judge Swann's question,
"Did you have any accomplice?" that
he paid the $9,000 to Kane in a tele-
phone booth in a cigar store on West
57th street a week ago tomorrow.
Kane not only agreed, according to
Dr. Waite, to swear in case of the
trial that there had been arsenic in
the embalming fluid, but he also was
to prepare some embalming fluid con-
taining arsenic and turn it over to
Judge Swann whenever the case
against Dr. Waite, then at liberty,
should grow serious.
At Kane's house tonight, where mem-
bers of his family said he had been
away since morning, but momentarily
was expected home, District Attorney'
Swann found Kane's regular formula
for preparing his embalming mixture.
It is against the law to use arsenic
in an embalming fluid. The formula!
found in Kane's house tonight con-
tained no arsenic.1
COUNCIL PLANS i
RESH CAP DAYt
Ceremony to Attend Official Opening1
of Spring Cap Season Discassed 1
at Last Night's MeetingI
CONSIDER F I R E PROTECTION1
A "Fresh Cap Day," when the year-
lings of all departments will simul-
taneously don their respective spring
headgear, is the latest plan of the
Student Council, following its meeting
of last night.-
Such an occasion, with appropriate
ceremonies, the Council believes will
materially aid in fostering more class
spirit among the freshmen. It has
been suggested that the Council se-1
lect a flay when there is a Varsity
baseball game at Ferry field and that
the yearlings meet somewhere on the
campus, and with the Varsity band
to lead them, march down to the base-<
ball field, where a special section oft
the bleachers will be reserved for
them.
To Confer Regarding Spring Contestst

Looking forward to the coming
spring class games, the Council au-
thorized its committee appointed for
the purpose to confer with a repre-
entative from each of the four se-
nior honorary societies regarding the
feasibility of modifying or changing
the rules for the contests so as to
make them less dangerous for the
participants. Grant Cook, '17L, and
(Continued on Page Six)

TAKEDFINITE STEPS
TO MAKEHURON SAFE
University Boat Club Offers to Stand
Expense of Erecting Devices if
Others Will Contribute
With the slogan "Safety-ize the Hu-
ron River," a vigorous campaign in-
stituted by the University Boat club
for the purpose of preventing a repe-
tition of the tragic river accidents of
recent years, is now in full sway.
Active co-operation is being received
from the Edison company, the city
council, the Michigan State Telephone
company, the Student Council, and the
Board of Regents. The old dam is to
be blown up, emergency telephones
will be placed on the banks, the city
will provide a motor boat patrolman,
snags and rocks will be blasted out,
the Boat club will build and equip
a series of safety stations along the
shore.
A number of letters were sent out
yesterday to the various campus so-
cieties appealing for donations of life
preservers, ropes, and other necessary
material for the equipment of shelters.
Six dollars will purchase the entire
outfit for a shelter, including the lum-
ber, the Boat club agreeing to stand
the expense of 'erection. Four societies
have already made contributions.
Smaller sums will be gladly received
and will be used for providing signs,
danger stakes, and other material.'
REHEARSAL PROMISES WELL
Second Dress Tryout of Latin Play
Held Yesterday Afternoon
The second dress rehearsal of
"Menaechmi" was held in University
hall yesterday afternoon. Those who
witnessed the rehearsal were especi-
ally pleased with the color scheme of
the costumes and the smoothness with
which the actors performed their
roles.
The scenery, which has been secur-
ed from Northwestern University, al-
though greatly in contrast to our
present elaborate stage settings, con-
forms strictly tot he scenery used by
the Romans in 215 B. C. at which time
the play was first produced.
The clever acting of Rollin C. Hun-
ter as Menaechmus II and Lewis P.
Waldo as the woman loved by Men-
aechmus 1. are sure to make a hit.
New Haven Has Bi Fire
New Haven, Mar. 28.-Fire of un-
known origin tonight burned several
large shops at the local yards of the
New Haven railroad, and at midnight
was spreading. Early estimates of the
loss put it at from $500,000 to $700,000.
Dr. Vaughan to Go to Chicago
Doctor V. C. Vaughan leaves for
Chicago tonight, where he will be en-
gaged on the case of the American
Medical association against the manu-
facturers of Wine of Cadui.
DISCUSS CITY MANAGER AGAIN
Plans New Open Meeting to Be Held
In High School Auditorium Saturday
Plans are now being arranged for
another open meeting for the discus-
sion of the city manager form of gov-
ernment to be held in the high school
Saturday night. A banquet in the
Congregational church for the men's
club of the church will be held just
before the meeting, and the speakers

who address this gathering will speak!
later at the high school. L. B. Up-
son, of Dayton, Ohio, is expected to be
present.
The registration booths are open
today, and it is the last opportunity
given to unregistered voters to make
themselves eligible to cast a ballot on
Monday, April 3, when the revision of
the city charter comes up for a vote.

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President Emeritus James B.
Angell's condition was improved
last night, according to his phy-
sician, Dr. James F. Breakey.
He had recovered from his re-
lapse of Tuesday and it is
thought that he will continue to
gain.
** * * * * * * * * *

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Failure to Hear News of
Causes Uneasiness
Administration

TAXICAB CDN.jDENIES
RUMORS oFrINRESE
iT. X. Meyers, Manager of Company,
States 'No Advance Has :Beeni
Made to His Knowledge
Despite rumors which have been
prevalent during the past week, the
Ann Arbor Taxicab company has not
and will not make any advance in its
rates. This statement was given out
by W. J. Myers, manager of the taxi-
cab company, in an interview yes-
terday.
The opinion that a change had been
made came about when several stu-
dents claimed that they had been
forced to pay 50c for a cab from the
depot, and $2.50 party rate. Accord-
ing to the statement of the manager,
if such a rate was charged, the driver
was solely responsible and secured
the extra amount.
The city ordinance relative to the

Washington, -March 28.-Congress
has voted over eight millions to pay
for the pursuit of the Mexican bandit,
Villa. The state department is try-
ing to settle with dispatch the rail-
way and troops supply problem with
Carranza. Several Americans are
reported seriously injured in a rail-
way accident south of Casas Grandes.
No reports are coming in from Persh-
ing or Colonel Dodd.
Congress rushed through emerg-
ency appropriations of $8,611,502 to
pay for the pursuit of the bandit, and
the state department is prepared to
press General Carranza for permis-
sion to use the Mexican railroads to
solve the troops supply problem.
Fears expressed in press reports from
the border that failure to obtain the
use of the railroads might seriously
hamper the pursuit of Villa were not
reflected in either the state or war
departments.
Diplomatic and domestic aspects of
the Mexican problem overshadow the
military side here tonight. Official
reports from General Funston* dis-
closes no change in the situation on
the border or in Mexico.

CONGRESS VOTES Ei
TO DEFRAY COST
REPORT MORE

HT MILLIONS
OF VILLA CHASE;
AMERICANSINJURED
STATE DEPARTMENT WRESTLES
WITH . RAILWAY AND
TROOP PROBLEMS
SEEK RIGHT TO USE RAILROAD

Pershing.
In

Illinois Executive to Have Chair
Michigan-Wisconsin Meet
on Friday

at

Governor Edward F. Dunne, of Il-
linois, will preside at the Michigan-
Wisconsin debate to be held in Hill
auditorium Friday night. President
Harry B. Hutchins received word toI
that effect yesterday.
The judges who have been selected
are Judge J. W. Eggeman, Fort Wayne,
Ind.; Professor Victor A. Ketcham,
Ohio State University, and Hon. Thom-
as L. Sidlo, Cleveland, Ohio.'
Both the men who are to meet Il-
linois and those who debate here are
rounding into shape, spending much
time on rebuttal. A large attendance
is expected on Friday night, particu-
larly with so many teachers in Ann
Arbor attending the Schoolmasters'
Conference. The band. will furnish
several musical numbers.
SAGINAW CLUB PLANS DANCE
Will Hold Informal Party During Va-
cation; J-Hop Music
Complete plans are now made for
the party which the Saginaw club of
the University is to give in the Au-
ditorium in Saginaw on April 14 dur-
ing the spring holidays.
The party will be informal, and the
musical program of the J-Hop will be
used with the addition of several num-
bers by the Varsity quartet and Waldo
Fellows of Detroit. Russo's J-Hop
orchestra will furnish music for danc-
ing. The party will be attended by
members of the Saginaw club and any
of the Michigan alumni who are in
then rit<t

rate of fare to be charged by taxicabs
and all other cabs used in the city, AMERICANS INJURED
sets the 25c limit upon the day serv- San Antonio, March 28.-Confirma-
ice and a 50c limit upon the service tion that General Pershing already
between 11:00 o'clock P. M. and 5:00 hasp been using a portion of the
o'clock A. M. There is no provision Northwestern railroad for transporta-
made for the present party rate which tion of troops was received by Gen-
the company is charging the students, eral Funston today from what was
but the added price here is supposed said to be an official source. This
to be only when a cab has been re- information included a report of the
served. overturning of two cars and the in-
--- _-juring of ten troops of the Tenth cav-
* * , * * * * * * , , airy, and several horses. Three of
* the men were reported injured seri-
* SCHOOLMASTERS, ATTENTION! * ously.
, The accident occurred while the
* The Michigan Daily has pub- * men were being taken over a "shoo-
* lished for your convenience a * fly" that had been built around the
* detailed program of the events * Cumbre . tunnel, south of Casas
Grandes. One of the rails gave way
* Four of this issue. * and the cars rolled down the em-
* r* bankment.
It was not believed at headquarters
* * * * x,''* * that General Pershing's use. of the
railroad prior to the receipt of per-
-- mission from the Carranza govern-
WH T'S GOING ON ment would endanger the negotiations
now being conducted by the state de-
partment. This is because it was as-
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin- sumed that he had gained permission
ity: Partly cloudy with moderate of these in charge of operations of
northeast winds. that section of the line.
-- No Reports from Pershing
TODXY No reports from General Pershing
9:00 o'clock-Mr. E. L. Crosby of were ereceived today but the silence
the Detroit Edison company speaks on caused no uneasiness at headquarters
"Electric Furnaces," room 165 Chem- where the chief concern continued to
istry building. be the problem of getting, supplies in-
11:00 o'clock-Prof. Parker addresses to Mexico without a railroad.
fresh engineer assembly. Advices from Washington that the
4:1'0 o'lock-Trycuts for German state department had prepared a
play, room 204 U-hall. memorandum urging Carranza to de-
4:00 o'clock - Senior lit meeting cide the question of using the rail-
(men only), Tapran hall. roads without waiting for the ratifi-
4:15 o'clock-Rose Pastor Stokes cation of the protbcol, revived the
speaks on "Socialism and Women," hope that perhaps by Thursday the
Natural Science builting auditorium, stores held at El Paso may be for-
6:00 o'clock---Board of directors of warded to some depot more acces-
the Michigan Union meet, Union. sible to the troops now operating al-
7:00 o'clock-Election of officers of most 300 miles from the boundary
the C. C. C. :team, trophy room, Wa- line.
terman gym. General Pershing Has Free Hand
7:30 O'cloek--Upptr . Peninsular Exactly where Colonel Dodd's cav-
club meets at Union. alry is now or how many detachiments
8:00 o'clock - Junior Girls' Play, it has been divided into, was unknown
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. at General Funston's headquarters
8:00 o''ock--Prof. Ernest A. Bessey today. The exact whereabouts of
speaks on "The Sexual Cycle of General Pershing also remains unre-
Plants." Natural Science Building au- ported, but this lack of information

What Do You Think of the
S OPH LITS
HAVING
hook's J-Hop Orchestra
AT THE '
Armory, Friday Afternoon, March 31I
2 to 5:30 (Tickets for the Evening Dance are all sold) Soc per Couple

!

ditorium.
'iTOMQRROW
5:45 o'clock - Men's E
club holds lanquet, Baptist
7:30 o'clock-Cosmopolitan
ception, Michigan Union.
U-NOTICE
A meeting for senior lit
be held at 4:00 o'clock this

- created no uneasiness for Gen
Pershing still has orders to work
his own problem.
ducational
church. Canadian Club Meets
a club re- Members of the Canadian Club h
ha short business meeting at the
ion last night. An executive meet
- was called for Tuesday, April 4
m--n will the union and a banquet to be gi,
afternoon after spring vacation was arran

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