100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-THIE 1DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

V
R

---
op.
2'7 Z -
x' .639

J --Phones:-Editorlal 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPI SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

so- W

9

-_
-- ----T --- ------ -

VOL. XXVI. No. 124.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

SCHOOLMASTERS'
CLUB CONVNES IN
ANN ARBOR TODAY
MEETINGS WILL BE HELD IN HIGH
SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY
BUILDINGS
1000 EXPECTED TO BE HERE
Many Prominent Professors from
Abroad Will Address the Peda-
gogues This Week
About 1000 Michigan pedagogues
are expectcd to attend the five-day
meeting of the Michigan Schoolmas-
ters' club which begins here today.
The meetings will be held in the high
school and university buildings,
Many persons prominent in the edu-
cational world will be brought here
to deliver lectures. Among these will
be Prof. Van den Ven, of the Univer-
sity of Louvain, Belgium; Dr. E. A.
Loew, of Oxford University, England;
Dr. George H. Allen, of Berlin, Ger-
many, who is at present writing sev-
eral volumes on the European con-
flict; Professor C. H. Judd, of the
University of Chicago; and Dr. James
P. Haney, of New York City.
The general meetings will be open
to all, but attendance to the confer-
ences is limited to -members. A spe-
cial arrangement has been made
whereby students wishing to attend
the special conferences may (obtain
free tirckets from the registrar's of-
fice..
DEUTSCHER VEREIN MEETS FOR
ELECTION OF MEMBERS TODAY
All members of the . Deutscher Ve-
rein are requested to attend the meet-
ing to be held at 4:00 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in the Verein room for the pur-
pose of electing new members.
Tryouts for the cast of the German-
play to be given under the auspices
of the Deutscher Verein will bg held
in room 204 U. Hall on Wednesday and'
Friday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock.
"Neffe als Onkle" is the name of the
play to be given this .year.
SELECT MEN WHO WILL
MAKE GLEE CLUB TRIP

J.D.Casto Wins
Annual Contest
Graduate Student Receives Unanimous
Decision; Teegarden Gets
Second Place
G. D. Casto, grad., won the annual
Prohibition contest last night with anf
oration on the "Call of the Hour."'
He was given first place by the un-
animous vote of the judges. H. B.
Teegarden, '17, was second with
"Starvation" as his subject. The third
place was awarded to J. R. Simpson,
'18.
Casto will speak in the state Pro-
hibition contest which will be held in
Ypsilanti on April 21.
Cosmo Club to bea
Guests of Unions
Three Numbers from All-Nation Revuef
to Feature Program; Sunshine
Trio Entertains
--~~v
Michigan's student body will uniteb
Thursday evening in tendering to thed
members of the Cosmopolitan clubi
one of the largest informal receptions
of the current college year. Openb
house" will begin at 7:30 o'clock.
Three complete numbers taken di-
rectly from the All-Nation Revue will
be staged by members of the cluba
as the guests of the evening, afterb
which three additional numbers, in-
cluding a special musical number by
the Sunshine Trio, will be given byt
Union members,\s hosts.
Howard Ramsey, '17E, is in charge
of the affair.
Opera Scores Bigt
Success on Trip
Audience of 4,000 People Greets
Troupe in Chicago; Last Perform-a
ance in Detroit Fridaya
Playing before capacity houses inr
both Toledo and Chicago, the Unionb
opera scored unusual successes onb
its spring tour, according to alumnint
and newspaper critics.b
Sikes, Grover, Atlas, Cook, Woodr
and Ilawkes acted. with more smooth-t
ness than in any lbcal performance,
and secured considerable commenda-l
tion from the audience. The work of
Earl Pardee, as Fan Mason, presenteda
in a breezy fashion, won favor withr
the alumni. The singing and dancingp
of the entire troupe proved to be bigI
factors in the success of the show.t
The Toledo alumni welcomed the1
opera by their large attendance, andt
announced he intention of securing
the Mimes production every year1
hereafter.
More than 4,000 people attended theJ
performance at the Auditorium in Chi-a
cago. After the performance, a supper)
dance was given at the Auditorium
hotel. While in Chicago, the opera
troupe made its headquarters at the
Hamilton cluib.
The last performance of Tres
Rouge" will be given in Detroit Fri-
day evening of this week. The entire
Lyceum theater has been sold out, and
there is now a possibility that the
show may be given twice in that city.
Report Waite Has'
Jiade Confession,

Brother of Accused States That Den-
tist Has Corrected His
First Story
New York, March 27.-District At-
torney Swann was informed tonight
that Dr. Arthur Warren Waite has
made a new confession of his com-
plicity in the death of his father-in-"
law, John Peck.
Judge Swann was at his country
place and has not been able to com-
municate with Frank A. Waite, a
brother of the accused dentist to
whom the new statement was made
in Bellevue hospital prison. Frank
Waite left the hospital tonight after
spending almost all of the afternoon
at his brother's bedside urging the
dentist to tell the truth.
As he went out he said his brother
had made a new statement amplifying
and correcting the story he had al-
ready told but he refused to tell the
nature of the new admission.

2 PLANES WITH
EXPEDITION HAVE
1BEEN DESTROYED
ONLY TWO OUT OF EIGHT MA-
CIIINES SENT INTO MEXICO F
IN WORKING ORDER
JUST EIGHT IN ENTIRE ARMY
r r
Mexican Goveriment May cauke Over
All Personal and Realty ,Hid-
ings of Clergy
Washington, Mar. 27.-Two of the 1
army aeroplanes with the Pershing -
expedition in Mexico have been de-
stroyed. Announcement to this ef-
fect was made at the war department
this afternoon by Secretary Baker. P
The Secretary was unable to giver
any details as to how the machines
were destroyed or whether their pilots
were injured. Department officials
believe the machines must have fallen
during scouting flights, but say that
if their drivers have been hurt or if
the machines have been brought down
by snipers, Pershing would have so
reported. '
Of the eight aeroplanes sent intoI
Mexico, the report shows only two
are now in working order, four of them
being laid up for engine trouble.
(Continued on Page Six)
CONSI)ER CIIAINGE IN PUBLIC C
SCHOOL SYSTEM OF ANN AROR t
--- a
Patrons of the Ann Arbor public
schools held a joint discussion with r
the members of the Board of Educa- c
tion last evening in the auditorium t
of the high school.
Tlye general sentiment was that thet
Ann Arbor schools are weak along 1
lines of vocational training, and the
appropriations which the board is to
ask for will probably be used to aE
great extent to provide for these
needs. After the sum needed hasf
been decided upon, the tax-payers will1
be given a chance to vote as to whe- f
ther or not bonds shall be issued. Ther
board's estimate is that $300,000 will
provide for all the necessary addi-I
tions. -
Dr. Bartell to Read Paper at meeting
"Negative Osmose" is the subject of1
a paper to be read before the regulart
meeting of the local branch of the
American Chemical society by Dr. F. E.c
Bartell, of the chemistry department,r
this afternoon. The meeting will be
held at 4:15 o'clock in room 151 of
the chemistry building.1
Prof. Wenley Says Success no Secret
"Success No Secret," was the sub-
ject of Prof. P1. M. Wenley's address
at the fresh lit assembly in U-hall'
yesterday afternoon. "There is no
secret to success," said the speaker.
"The thing is perfectly obvious."
WOMEN TO LUNCH APRIL 1
Annual Affair to Be held in Barbour
Gymnasium; Junior Play Follows
Numbers by Detroit alumnae and the
Girls' Glee club will feature the an-
nual Women's Luncheon, to be held
April 1 in Barbour gymnasium.
At the head of each table will be
two hostesses, who will be chosen from
faculty women or sorority chaperons.
A committee of senior girls will assist

at the informal reception which is to
begin at 11:30 o'clock, immediately
followed by the luncheon. These girls
will wear badges, and will introduce
guests and escort them upstairs to the
Junior Play. The best section of
Sarah Caswell Angell hall will be
roped off for luncheon guests and
alumnae.
Tickets for the luncheon are on sale
at Wahr's book store, in the library,
and in the corridor of University hall.
They must be secured on or before
Thursday, March 30.
Standard Oil Representative Here
E. S. Moffet, who spoke here last fall'
on the opportunity for positions for
men in the far east with the Standard
Oil company, will be at Hotel Allenel
until Thursday evening to meet any
one interested. His hours will be
from 10:00 to 12:30 in the morning
and 2:00 to 5:00 in the afternoon.

Noted Socialist
[Lectures Tonight
Rose Pastor Stokes to Appear In
University Ball; Open
Discussion Planned
Rose Pastor Stokes, poet, lecturer,
and social reformer, will speak at
8:00 o'clock this evening in Univer-
sity hall on the subject "Socialism and
Social- Reform." Mrs. Stokes, who was
born in Russia and came to this coun-
try at the age of three, has had phe-
nomenal success as a writer and so-
cial settlement worker. An open dis-
cussion will take place after the meet-
ing.
While in the city Mrs. Stokes will
be the guest of Mrs. Shull, wife of
Prof. A. F. Shull, of the zoology de-
partment. She will be entertained at
dinner tonight at Martha Cook resi-
dence.
Tomorrow afternoon at 4:00 o'clock
Mrs. Stokes will lecture in the Natu-
ral Science auditorium on the subject
'Socialism and Women."
JUNIOR IRLS TO STAGE
PLAY TOMORROW NIGHT
:Mystery Shrouding Title of Twelfth
Annual Prod uction Dispelled
on First Night
Continuing the tradition of enter-
tertaining their sisters of the senior
class, the junior women will stage
the twelfth annual Junior Girls' play,
at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The Ju-
nior Play takes the part in the wom-
en's activities that the Union Opera
takes for the campus in general. At
the first performance, the seniors are
the . guests of honor, coming in a
body, and wearing their caps and
gowns for the first time.
A second performance will be given
Saturday afternoon, following the
Women's Luncheon. The general
feminine public is admitted to both
performances, although the best seats
for the Wednesday evenig show are
reserved for seniors.
This year's play is expected to be the
best yet produced, special scenery and
costumes having been ordered from
Detroit for it.
The name of the play is never made
public till the night of the first per-
formance. The play is written by
Ruth Lenzer, the lyrics are the work
of Alice Wieber and Glda Ginsburg,
and the score is by Olga Shinkman,
Josephine Randall, and Christine
Stringer. The production is under
the direction of Professor Brumm.
WOLVERINE FLYER HITS AUTO
Two prominent Lansing Women In-
stantly Killed at Chelsea Sunday
Mrs. John Bohnet and Mrs. W. G.
Kern, bath prominent members of
Lansing social circles, were instant-
ly killed Sunday afternoon, at Chel-
sea, when the automobile in which
they were returning from a tour of
Florida, was struck by the Wolverine
flyer on tl e Michgan Central railroad,
at the crossing just :orth of the Meth-
odist Old People's Home. The ton-
neau of tae car was completely sev-
ered from the rest of the machine
a id the bodies of the two women were
carried about 100 feet along the track.

Mr. BoHnet and Mr. Kern were unhurt.
The party had stopped in Chelsea
for dinner, but had started for Lans-
ing expecting to reach there early in
the evening. Because ca the dense
fog, the train was i:ot seen until it
was upon them.
JUVENILE COURT JUDGE TALKS
AT WEEKLY Y. M1. C. A. MEETING
"We used to punish a person who
had committed a crime for crime's
sake, but now it is not a matter o
penalty but instead one of reforma-
tion," said Judge H. S. Hulburt of
the Detroit Juvenile cou'rt at the Ar
cade on Sunday Evening at the week
ly "Y", meeting.
"The attitude of 'the law has chang
ed from that of 20 years ago," Judg(
Hulburt continued. "We now try t
lift the 'bad' boy a little above- the
rest of his companions so that h
stands out as a good example."

ARMY HEADQUARTERS SAYS HARMONY
EXISTS WITH- CARRANZISTATROOPS1
6ENERAgL FUNSTON HINTS, OPPOSLTE

Announce Staff
of The Inlander
Copy for First Issue to Be Received
at Press Building Until
Noon Friday
Waldo R. Hunt, '16, editor in chief
of the new literary magazine, The In-
lander, yesterday made public the
staff which has been selected to take
charge of that publication for the rest
of the year. Muriel Tyson, '16, has
been appointed literary editor.
Members of the board of consulting
Conkey '16, Malcolm Maclean, '16,
editors are: I. C. Johnson, '16, A. D.
Frederick Parsons, '16, and Miriam1
Hubbard, '16; associate editors, Frank
Nesbit, '17, Lester Waterbury, '17,t
Verne Burnett, '17, and Leland
Thompson, '18.t
Copy will continue to be receivedf
until noon Friday. This may either
be mailed to "The Inlander" at thef
Press building, or handed to a mem-
ber of the staff who will be there
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and
Wednesday from 4:30 to 5:30 o'clock.
WHAT'S GOING ON z
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-.
ity-Warmer with moderate northeast
and east winds.,
TOD)AY1
Michigan Schoolmasters' Conference
begins today.
4:1 o'clock-Prof. Paul Van den
Van speaks on "The First and Sec-E
ond Fall of Constantinople," Uppert
Lecture Room Alumni Memorial hall.
4:15 o'clock--Regular meeting of lo-
cal branch of American Chemical so-
ciety, room 151 Chemistry building.
4:00 o'clock--Regular meeting ofE
Deutscher Verein, in rooms U-hall.
9:00 o'clock a. m.-Dr. Charles B.
Deavenport speaks on "Family Rec-
ords," Auditorium Natural Science
building.
8:00 o'clock-Dr. Charles Daven-
port speaks on "The Relation Be-1
tween Juvenile Promise and Adult
Performance," Auditorium Natural
Science building.
8:00 o'clock-Rose Pastor speaks
on "Socialism and Social Reform,"
U-hall auditorium.
7:00 o'clock-Special meeting of the
Educational club, room 105 Tappan
hall.
4:00 o'clock-Phi Alpha Tau meets
at Union.4
7:30 o'clock-Adelphi club meets in
Adelphi rooms, fourth floor U-hall.
7:15 o'clock-Student council holds
special meeting, N. W. University
hall.
TOMORROW
9:00 o'clock-Mr. E. L. Crosby of
the Detroit Edison company speaks on
"Electric Furnaces," room 165 Chem-
istry building.
4:00 o'clock-Tryouts for German
play, room 204 U-hall.
4:15 o'clock-Dr. E. A. Loew speaks
on "Mediaeval Repositories of Learn-
ing," Upper lecture room, Alumni Me-
morial hall.
S :15 o'clock-Prof. Van den Van
speaks on "Byzantine Monuments of
Italy," Upper lecture room, Alumni
Memorial hall.
7:30 o'clock-Upper . Peninsular
club meets at Union.
4:15 o'clock-Rose Pastor Stokes
speaks on "Socialismf and Women,"
Natural Science building auditorium.

U.-NOTICES
f A special meeting of the men 01
- the senior lit class will be held to-
f morrow afternoon at 4:00 o'clock in
. Tappan hall. Everyone requested to
- be out.
All senior women are invited by the
- Mortar board,, senior women's society,
e to meet with them at a pre-Junio
o girls' play at Newberry hall at 7:
e o'clock tonight.

U. S. FORCES NEVER BETTER
PREPARED, SAYS
DISPATCH
MEXICANS PERMITTED ESCAPE
Soldiers Suffering from Cold; Villa
About 100 Miles to South-
East of Camp
Galveston, Mar. 27. -Villistas
have captured Torreon, the met-
ropolis of the state of Chihuahua,
according to a report received here
tonight. All southern Chihuahua
and Coahuila are now said to be in
the hands 0f the handits.
Headquarters of the Punitive Ex-
pedition, United States Army, near
Casas Grandes, Mexico, by aeroplane
to Columbus, New Mexico, March 27.-
The further south the army penetrates,
the more persistent and consistent be-
comes the co-operation and assistance
in pursuit of Villa on the part of the
forces commanded by officers of the
Carranza government, a circumstance
very favorably commented upon by
officers of the armed expedition.
Never in the history of the army of
the United States has every branch
of the service, cavalry, infantry and
artillery, given better evidence of its
mobility, stamina and preparedness
than on this expedition. Since leav-
ing Columbus, March 15, the army
has reached a point 200 miles south-
ward, every mile of which was trav-
elled overland through some of the
roughest country in the republic of
Mexico.
"I am proud of the record made by
the forces under my command on this
occasion," said General Pershing, lead-
er of the expedition, when discussing
the matter this afternoon, "The men
and animals are in splendid condition
and, so far as the men are concerned,
the furher they get into the interior
of the country the more enthusiastic
they seem to become."

Include Mandolin Club Sextet
List of Those Who Take
Western TIour

in

After a series of try-outs lasting
.since last week, men for both the
Glee and Mandolin clubs who will make"
the western trip were picked last night.
Those who will start on the west-
ern tour are: Glee club-first tenors,
H. L. Davis, '17, P. A. Hartesveldt,
'16L, T. S. Barnett, '16, R. A. Parker,
'16; .second tenors, C. C. Bailey, '17,
H. W. Kerr, '16, F. W. Grover, '18, and
Prescott Smith, '18; first bass, U. S.
Wilson, '16, C. B. Sikes, '16, R. R.
Dieterle, '18, and W. Scott Westerman,
'17; second bass, H. C. Carlson, '17,
S. J. Hiett, '16L, C. P. Ritchie, '16,
and H. L. Haag, '16; alternates, W.
S. James, '16D, W. Kleinstecker, '16D,
H. M. Easley, '16, and D. W. Jen-
nings, '16. Mandolin Club sextet-F.
C. Wheeler, '16E, II. B. Forsythe, '17,
L. 0. Aldrich, '17E, 0. O. Leininger,j
'16D, Leroy Scanlon, '16L, and H. L.
Davis, '17.
In addition to the above men, the
clubs willbe accompanied by Theo-
dore Harrison for the faculty, David R.
Balientin.e, '16, manager, M. A. Nich-
olls, assistant manager, and F. A. Ta-
ber, '17, pianist.
TODAY LAST 1AY TO SECURE
COMMENCEMENT 1NVITATIONS
Senior lits who have not ordered
commencement invitations as yet have
only up to tonight to do so. The time
set for the ordering of invitations ex-
pired over two weeks ago, but since
over 175 seniors have not been heard
from as yet, this extra time allowance
has been secured from the printers.
The definite order for invitations
will be placed Wednesday and it will
be impossible for seniors to secure
them after that time. It is therefore
necessary that all orders be in the
hands o' the committee this evening.

CHIEFTAIN IS RETI EATING
Villa was reported nearly 100 miles
southeast of this point, which indicates
that he is retreating. It is believed
that the American forces cannot get
any contact with him. There is in-
timation that, far from seeking asy-
lum in the Duerro district where he
is supposed to have been, Villa has
turned eastward, giving no indication
as to his ultimate object.
A new advance base for the Ameri-
can army has been established 100
miles below Casas Grandes, and nio-
tor companies have left for this base
loaded with supplies of all kinds for
the troops stationed there. The gar-
rison now at the front is composed of
organizations representing all branch-
es of the military service.
CARRANZISTAS TO BLAME
San Antonio, Maxi, 27. - General
day, General Pershing announced that
that Villa did not break through the
line of the American forces, but slip-
ped past the Carranzistas.
There is reason to believe that the
Carranza troops are not only failing
to co-operate actively with the Ameri-
can troops but are actively aiding Villa
to escape. General Funston reported
that the expeditionary force was suf-
fering from cold. Being very lightly
clad for service, he said our troops
are now actually suffering from the
extreme cold in the mountain coun-
try. -

Lieutenant Bowen, the ,aviator in-
jured in a fall at Casas Grandes, ar-
rived at San Antonio today and was
taken to Fort Sam Houston hospital.
General Funston has received no word
of sniping by Mexicans as reported
from El Paso. He says General Per-
shing would report to him, if it were
true.
Returning to Casas Grandes on Sun-
day General Pershing announced that
he had established an advance base
at El Valle, 20 miles south of the
present field base. Casas Grandes, be-
ing 110 miles from the border, the
American troops are now 130 miles in
the interior of Mexico, with the dis-

Prof. Wenley will not meet his
Ethics class at 10;:00 today.

tance daily increasing.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan