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March 26, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-26

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0

IHE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD ANI)
THE CAMPUS

0 Z-1
ALL

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

__ , .p --- ------

VOL. XXVI. No.;23.

ANN 'ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 26, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

1

V -. _..___. --___..

AMERICANIlVES
LOST 1INATTAC(
ON BRITISH SHIPS,
OFFICIALS SHOCKED BY NEWS
OF I. S. 'CITJENS
lEATH
SITUAIION MAY BECOME ACUTE
Paris Dispatch Says That Sussex Was
Torpedoed; Suspend .Jdgment
Pending Furthur Data
Washington, Mar. 25.-News of the
loss of American lives by the destruc-
tion of the British steamer, English-
man, and the damaging of the channel
liner, Sussex, by topedo or mine, came
as a distinct shock to officials here.
No secret is made of the fact that the
submarine issue with Germany may
rapidly reach an acute stage as a con-
seuenice.
President Wilson received the offi-
cial confirmation of both reports early
and Secretary Lansing will transmit
to the White House further details as
soon as they reach here. Immediate
instructions were cabled to Consul-
General Skinner, in London, to gather
all available facts and institute a
thorough investigation.
Meanwhile both President Wilson
and the state department have no other
course to follow than to suspend judg-
ment pending further official informa-
tion. Secretary Lansing, however, will
interrupt his work of preparing a
memorandum outlining the position of
the United States on the armed ship
and submarine issue.
Paris. Mar. 25.-The Minister of
Marine in an official statement tonight
declares the Sussex was torpedoed,
and estimates the number of victims
at about 50
FOUR CAMPUS DEBATING
SOCITIESPICKTEAMS
Preliminary to Annual Cup Debate
Will Be Held on April
5 and
Teams have been picked by the four
campus debating societies to represent
them in the annual Cup debate, the
preliminaries to which are to be held
on April 5 and 6.
The teams are: Jeffersonian, S. D.
Frankel, '17L. R. A. McGuinis, 18L,
and H. L. McCarthy, '17L; Adelphi,
J. R. Simpson, '18, H. D. Hopkins, '16,
W. A. Pearl, '16; Webster, Dorothy V.
McCormick, '18L, S. F. Cohn, '18L, and
A. P. Bogue, '18L, and Alpha Nu, C.
E. Hutton, '17, R. B. Cunliffe, '16. and
Louis Luebbers, '18.
TSRN LARGE TOLEDO AUDI0ENCE
Performance in Chicago Last Night
Arrive in Ann-Arbor-
at Nooi Today
Playing to a capacity audience at
the Valentine theatre in Toledo Fri-
day night, "Tres Rouge" won an en-
thusiastic reception on the first of its

out-of-town performances. Chase B.
Sikes, as leading man, Cook, Grover,
and Wood, are credited with doing ex-
cellent work.
Last Vight the company gave a per-
formance at the Auditorium theatre in
Chicago, having entrained for that city
early yesterday morning from Toledo.
The special cars bearing the opera,
troupe will reach Ann Arbor from
Chicago about noon today.

i

WAITE CONFESSES
HE GAVE P01SN
Bre:it, t±9E3o imer il~il i'id
AdXtis All but Actual Adndii,

i

WILSON GHARGES NEWSPAPERS WITH
CONSPIRACY TO PLUNGE UNITED
STATES INTO WAR WITH ,MEXICO

teritg ig f 1r
_ tBBL

I N S A NITY

) E FE N SE

IWILIARI) RET!AINS TTLiiE

BISHOP CHARLES I). WILLIAMS
21 ishop Williams
To Preach Today
Will Speak at St. Andrew's Clureh in
Second of a Series of Spe-
cial Addresses
Bishop Charles D. Williams of the
Episcopal diocese of Michigan will
preach this morning in St. Andrew's,
Episcopal Church, in addition to mak-
ing his annual visitation to the parish
for confirmation. This is the second
of a series of special addresses which
have been arranged in St. Andrew's
Church for the Lenten season, the
speaker 'for next week being the Very
Rev. Dean A. H. White of the Pro-
Cathedral at Grand Rapids.
During the past two weeks, Bishop
Williams has been in Philadelphia,

A breakdown and confession by Dr.
Arthur W. Waite of all but the actual
administration of the poison to his
father-in-law John E. Peck, of Grand
Rapids, caie yesterday after terri-
fic pressure applied by detectives and
representatives from the district pros-
ecutor's, ofice in New York City.
"I bought arsenic and gave it to Mr.
Peck, who told me he wanted to die.
I did not put it in his soup or his
coffee. Since arsenic was found at
' the autopsy he must have taken it."
The above statement was the result
of hours of questioning by detectives
and others working on the case. Waite
is in bed in the criminal ward of Belle-
vue hospital, suffering from the after-
effects of an overdose of self-admin-
istered drugs.
Although no definite statement has
been made, it became evident yester-
day that the defense will be made on
the plea of insanity. Data is already
being collected by friends of the ac-
cused man in regard to his mental
habits and peculiarities.
At her old home in Grand Rapids,
the wife of the physician is suffering
a nervous breakdown as a result of
the disclosure to her of the charges
made against her husband.
The parents of Dr. Waite are now
in New York endeavoring to secure
evidence that will prove their son's
innocence. An additional charge of
misappropriation of $40,000 entrusted

Madison Square Garden, New
York, Mar. 25. -- Jess Willard
easily retained his title of cham-
pion pugilist of the world by
outfighting Frank Moran in
Madison Square Garden last
night. He won despite the fact
that he broke his right index
finger in the second round. The
big champion was not only too
big and strong for Moran; he
was vastly too clever. The first
round was a draw, but every
other period went in the tall
fighter's favor by a decided mar-
gin, although he was unable to
land a knockout blow.
Judge H. Hulburt
S- peak -nigh-t
I amous Detroit Jurist to Talk on
Crime in Arcade Theater
This Evening

ROLLIN C. IhUNTER,'17
Who will take the part of Menaechmus
11 i, MLatin lay
'MENAECHMI' CASTI
List Includes Well Known CaInIptIs
Actors; All Parts Taken by
Men

r

where he has been acting as special to him by Miss Catherine Peck, sis-
Lenten preacher at a series of Lenten ter of John E. Peck, will be brought
noonday services held in that city. forward by District Attorney Swann.
He has also spent considerable time ____ _____
in the east recently, acting as univer-
sity preacher at Cornell, Harvard and P BTI r
several other of the larger colleges in U
that section of the country. SITUTION NO CLAER
Zoologists Get Returns from ilarc Primaries Fal
Scholarship to Throw Light onPresi-
dentil Prospects

Kndness of
Secures

Bryant Walker, Detroiter,,
Award for Fitiversity 1
Students I

Washington, Mar. 25.-With the re-
turns all in from the March primaries,
the situation regarding the Republican
presidential nomination is not made
any clearer than it was just beforej

Through the kindness of Mr. Bryant
Walker, of Detroit, the Zoological1
Department is enabled to award thisI
year one scholarship at the Marine
Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole,
Mass. The scholarship entitles the
holder to free tuition, valued at $50,
during the summer session of the la-
boratory.
An announcement of the courses of-
fered at Woods Hole is attached to
the Zoological bulletin board in the
new Science building, and copies of it
may be obtained by addressing Pro-
fessor F. R. Lillie, University of Chi-
cago, or from Miss Powers at the Zoo-
logical Laboratory.
Written application for this schol-
arship should be addressed to Profes-
sor Reighard and may be left with
Miss Powers in room Z-229, Natural
Science building. The award will be
made by the Zoological faculty before
April 15.

i

I

the first delegates to the Chicago con-
vention were elected.
Approximately 160 of the 985 com-
prising the national convention have
been chosen. Forty of these, embrac-
ing the entire Indiana delegation of 30,
and 10 of the 26 from Kentucky, are
instructed in favor of former Vice-
President Fairbanks.
The-Minnesota delegation of 24 has
been chosen and instructed for Sena-
tor Cummins of Iowa. Senator LaFol-
lette has backed the Minneosta dele-
gation of 10. All the rest of the dele-
gates so far elected are uninstructed.
Dr, Walter Manton Lectilres Tomorrow
"Trhe Relation of the Physician to
the Social Service Worker," will furn-
ish the subject of a lecture to be given
by Dr. Walter Manton, of Detroit, to-
morrow night at 7:45 o'clbck in the
Hospital Medical amphitheater.

SINGEVS TO All) INTE ltPRETATIONt
Final selection of the cast for the
"Menaecbmi," the Latin play to bet
given in University hall March 30, hast
been announced and includes some
names well known in campus theatric-
al productions.
The cast is as follows:
Earl Pinney, '16............ Prologus
George Wilner, '17 ................
Peniculus, a Parasite1
Dr. Gilbert H. Taylor..........
Menaechmus I, a citizen of Epidamnus
Rollin C. Hunter, '17............
Menaechmus II, a citizen of Syracuse
Lewis P. Waldo, '18............
Erotium, a woman of Epidamnus
Loved by ilenaechmus I.
Maurice S. Tolochko, '19..........
Cylindrus, cook of Erotium
Ralph M. Carson, '17............
Messenio, slave of Menaechmus I
Charles Wilner, '19..............
Ancilla, maid of Erotium
John B. Barker, '16.............
Matrona, wife of Menaechmus I
George Robbert, '16.. Senex, her father.
James K.. Hazel, '19.......... Medicus
Roswell A. McIver, '19...........
Decio, slave of the Matrona
All of the roles will be taken by men
as was the custom in the Roman the-
ater. Special attention is being given
to the costuming and staging in order
to produce as nearly as possible an
historically correct presentation. The
first full dress rehearsal will be held
Monday night.
The singers will be Kenneth N.
Westerman, of the school of music;
Doris Marvin, Chase B. Sikes, '16,
George P. Becker, '16, and Rorace L.
Davis, '17, and in accordance to Ro-
(C'ontinued on Page Six)

"Causes of Crime Among Boys and
Girls and Their Remedy," will be the
subject of an address to be given by
Judge Henry S. Hulburt, of the De-
troit Probate court, to men only, in
the Arcade theatre at 6:30 o'clock Sun-
day evening.
This meeting is being conducted by
the lay students of the Y. M. C. A.
Dean Bates of the Law school may be
secured to introduce the speaker and
to preside at the meeting, although
definite announcement cannot be made
at this time.
Judge Hulburt, although not so
widely known as Judge Ben Lindsey of
Denver, is considered one of the fore-
most juvenile court judges in the
country, and speaks from many ex-
periences in dealing with "bad" boys
and girls.
WHAT'S GOING ONI
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-'
ity : Warmer, with variable winds.
TfODAY
10:30 o'clock-Bishop C. D. Williams
speaks, St. Andrew's church.
2:30 o'clock-Polonia Literary Cir-
cle meets, McMillan hall.
2:30 o'clock-Cosmopolitan Club.
meeting, Unitarian church.
3:0 'clock - Deaconess Goodwin
speaks at Harris hall.
7:30 o'clock-H. Lester Smith speaks
Methodist church.
7:30 o'clock-Bishop C. W. Williams
speaks, St. Andrew's church.
TOMORROW
2:00 to 4:00 o'clock - Deaconess
Goodwin will be at home to Episcopal
girls.
4:00 o'clock-Prof. R. W. Wenley
speaks to fresh lits, U-hall auditorium.
4:30 o'clock-Oratory board meet-
ing, 304 N. W., University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Annual prohibition fi-
nals, room B, Law building.

WARNS PUBLIC NOT TO CREDIT
STORIES COMING FROM
BORDE R
EXPECT CLASH MOMENTARILY
Villa Evades One Trap at El Oso, but
Is Prevented from Reaching
High Sierras
Washington, Mar. 25.-President
Wilson appealed to the nation tonight
for aid in thwarting a conspiracy which
he declares has been organized for
plunging the United States into war
with Mexico.
In a formal statement issued at the
White House by the President, he
charges that a campaign of falsehood
is being carried on through the news-
papers of the country for the purpose
of bringing about intervention in the
interests of certain American owners
of Mexican property. The President
warns the people of the country that,
if the campaign is permitted to con-
tinue, "very serious conditions may be
caused unnecessrily, bloodshed may
result, and the relations between the
two republics may be very much em-
barrassed."
The President expresses the hope
that the people of the United States
will be on their guard against credit-
ing any stories coming from the bor-
der, and he entreats the editors of
newspapers that they "make it a
natter of patriotism and conscience
to test the sources and authenticity of
every report they receive from that
quarter."
Would Reassure De Facto Government
The President has a double purpose
it is understood, in issuing his state-
ment. He desires to reassure the de
facto government of Mexico that in
sending troops across the border the
United States is actuated by the single
purpose to capture Villa, thus making
it easier for Carranza to restrain Mexi-
can public opinion in case of effort
to inflame the southern republic
against this country.
In the second place, the President
desires to head off what is regarded
as a growing agition within the United
States for a more general movement
on the part of this government to re-
store peace in Mexico.
With'a view to reassuring Mexicans
that the United States has no ulterior
purpose to serve in dispatching troops
across the border, the President's
statement has been cabled to Ameri-
can consuls in Mexico for general cir-
culation and transmission to the Car-
ranza government.
May Prosecute False News Circulators
The President's utterance, it is said,
may be the forerunner of vigorous
measures on the part of the- Depart-
mnent of Justice and other agencies
to bring about the prosecution of those
responsible for the circulation of in-
flammatory reports concerning con-
ditions along the border.
Pursuit Closing In on Bandits
El Paso, Mar. 25. - Villa is being
driven into the open country eastward
from Namiquipa by a semicircle of
American and Carranza troops.
He has escaped from what seemed to
be a trap at El Oso, five miles from
Namiquipa, and' is heading for the
plains country along the Mexican Cen-
tral railroad.
This information was given out by
General Gabriel Gavira, Carranza com-
mander at Juarez, today. Though ViI-
la escaped, the Americans and Carran-
za forces accomplished a coup at EJ
Oso.
Villa was headed off from the high
Sierras on the west. While the jaws
of the trap set for him at El Oso did
not close upon him, his present sit-

(Continued on Page Six)

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Rev. Dr. H. Lester Smith
Pastor of the Central M. E. Church, Detroit
Special Music
Ada Grace Johnson, Soprano; Alice Bliton,Contralto; Odra Patton, Tenor;
Stanley Wilson, Bass; Dr. G. Strong, Violinist; E. MarkWisdom, Organist;
TO:NIGH Methodist Church TO-NIGHT
at 7:30 EE~U PI~ at 7:30

Mr. Douglas preaches this
morning at 10:30 onl
"In Training for Life Work"
Of special interest to students.

i

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Tickets must
be secured at
Wahr's
or
The Library
before
March 3Q.

10th Annual Women's Luncheon

Barbour gymnasium

Tickets must
be secured at
'Wahr's
or
TheLibrary
before
March 30.

April ist

12 Noon

Tickets 75c

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