100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAILY
2.50I
[E WORLD AND
CAMPUS

The

All fan

Daily

Pliones:--Editorial -14
Business 969
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

'I. No. 12.

ANN ARBOR, MICHI4AN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1915.

PRICE FIVE C

LYERINES GET
VTTWO SCORES
IALS RULE OUT THIRD
RE BECAUSE OF ALLEGED
ROUGHNESS

MANY CLASSES TO FINISH
ELECTIONS IN TIMEFOR
STUDENT DIRECTORY LIST

SOPHOMORES TAKE
AL FllVE POINTS
|IN fALLCONTESTS
SECOND YEAR MEN TAKE ALl
THREE POLES WITH LIT-
T1lE DIFFICULTY

UNION CAMPglsN
MAY NOT REACH
HANDTOTAL SET
ENTHUSIASM DLMINISHES AFTER
FIRST WEEK OF WORK;
, END iN SIGHT

*
*
:
*<
r

Results of Eastern Ganes
Yestcrd.ii,

Harvard, 9; Virginia, 0.
Yale, 19; Spring Ield, 0.
Dartmouth, 60; Vermont,
Princeton, 40; Lafayette,s
Cornell, 41; Bucknell, 0.
Army, 0; Colgate, 13.
Navy, 7; Penn, 7.

* *
,K
a:
*.

MiNISTERS READ
TO LEAVE GREECE
LONDON BELIEVES GREECE NAY
FAVOR TEUTONS; ADVOCATES
BILOVIKA)DE OF COAST

0.
3.

Senior Lits,
.an s

Laws, A reitects
to Hold Meetings
Tomorrow

and

BY AERIAL ROUTE

Yost's Line Does Not Hold Against
Clevelanlers, Who Use Pass
Successfully
Case, 3; Michigan, 14. This was
really the final score. Some thought
the count should include another
touchdown for Michigan, but the offi-
cials agreed that the penalty for
roughness made by "Maullie's" second
touchdown void.
The members of the' Case eleven
got the jump on the Wolverines, and
pushed across a count before Mich-
igan was fairly warmed up. The
Clevelanders made their score possible
when Kretch recovered Raymond's
fumble on Michigan's 35-yard line.
Then Case displayed their prize play,
a formation which scattered the vis-
itors to every corner of the field. It
netted Coach Engelhorn's proteges
just 10 yards by the forward pass
route. Another forward pass put Case
in a position to drop a field koal over
the bar, and Quarterback Hense was
no man to overlook the chance. Ban-
nerman was the man selected to do
the toe work, and he drop-kicked a1
perfect goal from Michigan's 18-yard
line.
This made the Wolverines quite
angry, and they did their best to push
over a touchdown, but Bannerman and
the Case defense kept Yost's pupils
out of the danger zone throughout the
remainder of the first quarter. Mich-
igan scored three first downs, but the1
Case line held in the pinches, andl
Benton and Bannerman exchanged1
punts without much ,gain either way.
The quarter ended with the .count 31
to 0 in favor of Case, and with the
ball in Michigan's possession on her
own 35-yard line.
Eberwein gained two yards to start3
the second stanza going, and Ray-
mond followed with a punt to Case's
48-yard line. Bannerman returned
with a boot which sent the. ball to
Michigan's 10-yard line. Roehm re-
ceived and made a nice run, bringing'
(Continued on Page Three) .
YPSI' NORMALS HOLD
DOUGLASS' GRIDOERS
IN SCORELESS CONTEST
Fumbles Cost Yearlings the Game;
Both Sides Show Excellent l
Defense

1917 LAWS TO "AME ANOTHER
CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENCY
LAWRENCE ROEHM RUNS AGAINST
ANGELL FOR SENIOR LIT
OFFICE
Since the section of the students'
directory, which. is to contain the list
of officers of the various classes, will

ONLY FEW SUSTAIN INJURIES; DETROIT HEADS LIST OF CITIES

VIiiC Spree is ('lose, With Six Draws;-
Will Present eligs to Owners at
T oe biil Meetig Thursday
Three banners of yellow and blue

Jfsuiderstanding as to Tinie
flaking Reports Leads to
Difficulties

* * * * * * * * * *

for l

PROF3 ALFRED H. LLOYD
RECEIVES APPOINTiMENT
TO GRADUATE DEANSHIP

Reports received from 111.commit-I

go to the printers Monday evening, a waved from three poles on south tees last night brought the Michigan

large percentage of the class nomina- Ferry field at 9:30 o'clock yesterday

tions and elections will be completed
tomorrow.
Senior lits will hold their election
from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon in Tappan. hall. Through
an error, the name of Lawrence S.
Roehm was omitted in yesterday's is-.
sue of The Daily from the list of can-
didates for the presidency of the 1916
lit class, and the name of Harold L.
Smith was substituted. Roehm and
James B. Angell, II, were the two
candidates in the class caucus who re-
ceived the most votes, and their names
therefore will be the only ones to ap-
pear on the ballots.
Senior laws will make their nomi-
nations at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow aft-
ernoon in room B of the law building,
while the .1916 architects will name
their candidates at 5:15 o'clock the
same afternoon in room 311 of'the en-
gineering building.
Senior dents will hold their election
at 10:00 o'clock tomorrow morning in
the corridor of the dental building.
Junior Laws 'fake Nominations
The junior laws have nominated the
following for the various class offices:
President, Louis F. Dahling and
Thomas F. McDonald; vice-president,
Glen Howland and J. Sanders; sec-
retary, Thomas E. Atkinson and Ar-
thur H. Lee; treasurer, Harold A. Bar-
nard, only nominee; football manager,,
Morris Dunne and Joseph Fee; bas-
ketball manager, C. A. Lokker; track
manager, Ferris Fitch, only nominee;
sergeant-at-arms, Paul Dunten, only
nominee; oratorical delegate, Grant
L. Cooke and M. A. Schlissel. The
election will be held from 4:00 to 6:00
o'clock next Friday afternoon in room
C of the law. building.
Junior lits will elect officers from
3:00 to 6:00 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in front of the general library.
Junior engineers will make their nom-
inations at 7:15 tomorrow evening in
room 348 of the engineering building,
and the election will be held from 5:00
to 6:00 o'clock Wednesday afternoon
at the same place. Junior medics will
meet to elect a president and a base-
ball manager at 11:00 o'clock Wednes-
day morning in the amphitheater at
the general allopathic hospital.,
The 1917 class of the dental college
has nominated the following men for
its class offices: President, R. South-
erland and Clyde E. Tuttle; vice-presi-
dent, William Getty and Max L. Weny;
secretary, William E. Higgins and
Frederick W. Trigg; treasurer, Paul
Griesmer and Walter B. Steele; bas-
ketball manager, Paul S. Crosby and
Harry B. Wright; baseball manager,
Frederick Gerbstadt and Alan D.
Honey. The election will be held at
11:00 o'clock tomorrow morning in
the dental building.,
Junior, homeops will hold their elec-
tions at 12:00 o'clock Monday in lec-
ture room C of homeopathic nurses'
home No. 2.
Fresh Laws Meet Again Today
Due to the withdrawal of James M.
Barrett, Jr., from candidacy for the
office of president of the 1918 law
class, the class will meet tomorrow
to select another candidate to run for
the office in opposition to William E.
Mathews. The hour and place of the
(Continued on Page Six)

morning. Two minutes later, at the
crack of a pistol, two lines of sopho-
mores rusht from opposite sides to-
w..rd the middle pole, defended by tbc
men of '19. A fierce struggle lasted
fr eight minutes, and then a sopho-
more, Carl Baumann, '18A, wriggled
o:t of the freshmen arms and up the
pole, capturing the "M" flag which
hung therefrom.
As soon as Baumann started up the
c utral flag the sophomores deserted
it and concentrated their attack upon
the west pole. The struggle here last-
ed but three minutes, and A. B. Wes-
tar, '18E, went up for the second flag.
With two fhags oit .of the way the real
b ttle of the morning was staged for
possession of the east flag. In four
more minutes, however, Homer Mar-
son, 'ISE, scaled the pole for the last'
flag. This gave the flag rush to the
sophomores by a score of 4-0. The
total time for the contest was 15 min-
ates.
Sopliomores Take Cane Spree
The second event, the cane spree,
participated in by 30 members from
each class, went to the second year
men by a close majority. The sopho
mores wrested away 13 sticks to 11
taken by freshmen contestants. The
other six canes went the full time
limit of 10 minutes to a draw. The
sophs to take canes were: F. Martin,
H. Garous, H. W. Jones, L. A. Andrus,
J. S. Klump, J. W. Edwards, O. Bur-
.ett, L. S. Crane, W. F. Zingg, R. E.
Johnston, C. W. Good, J. W. Helfrich
(Continued on Page Three)
DR, FROST UNABLE TO
SPEAK HERE TONIGHT
ilexlpec JeJ E egag i (ent Prevents Him
from Filling Date to Speak
in Local Church
Dr. William Goodell Frost, president
of Berea college, Kentucky, the "Abe
Lincoln of the South," will not be
able to speak at 7:45 o'clock this even-
ing at the Presbyterian church, as
was announced earlier in the week,
owing to an unexpected engagement.
His place will be filled, however, by Dr.
J.ohn Seibert, an Oriental traveler, who
will give a stereopticon lecture on
"Mediterranean Countries." Rev. L.
A. Barret, the local minister, will
preach at the regular morning service
at 10:30 o'clock.

Union's national building campaign
total up to $286,261. While the 95
committees yet to report may not
bring the grand total up to the $500,000
mark set as the goal for the first two
weeks of the canvass, the final week
is expected by those in charge to more
than make up for any deficiency that
may remain after the reports for the
first half of the campaign are com-
pleted
Detroit leads the list of cities sub-
scribing to the Union fund during the
first two weeks, with $116,261, Chicago
coming next with $31,330. In all, 36
committees have reported totals of
$1.000 or more, the other 75 reports
received to date being for smaller
amounts
Committee Work Slows Down
A noticeable let-up in the work of
the committees after the opening
night's enthusiasm can be seen in the
dropping off in the speed with which
the returns have been coming in dur-
ing the past week. As the end of the
campaign draws near, however, those
in charge of the project expect to see
a corresponding; increase in activity
on the part of all engaged in the
work, especially during the final week,
when daily meetings will be hold with
reports from all parts of the country
showing the progress made by every
one of the 206 committees at work.
The fourth week of the campaign
has been designated "Concentration
Week," and it is from this final effort
of the Union workers that the great-
est results are expected.
A number of comnmittees which are
expected to show up well have not
yet made reports to the local office,
as there has been some misunder-
standing as to the Mme of making the
reports.
Wemien's League Board Holds Meeting
Much important business was trans-
acted at the first board meeting of
the Women's league held yesterday.
The vacancies in the advisory board
were filled by the following: Mrs. A.
G. Hall, Mrs. J. R. Effinger, Mrs. H.]
V. Wann, who were elected for a pe-
riod of two years, and Mrs. Max Wink-
ler, Mrs. W. D. Henderson and Mrs.
W. M. Bishop were chosen to serve
for one year. Olive Hartsig was cho-
sen as junior director on the board
to replace Anita Kelley, ex-16.
A request was made that delegates
from all sorority houses be elected at
once and the names be submitted to
Dean Myra B. Jordan before tomor-
row. 'These representatives will hold
an important meeting some time dur-.
ing the week.

Spent Several Years Studying at the
Universities of Gottingen, Ber-
lin and Heidelberg
SINCE 1912 GRADUATE SCHOOL
OFFERS WORK IN ALL BRANCHES
FIGURES INDICATE THAT NUM-
BER OF STUDENTS IS GROW-
ING RAPIDLY
As the successor to the late Prof.
Karl E. Guthe, the board of regents
in their meeting on Friday afternoon
appointed Prof. Alfred H. Lloyd to
the deanship of the Graduate school.
Professor Lloyd is at present chair-
man of the standing committee on stu-
dent affairs.
Alfred Henry Lloyd, Ph.D., was
born at Montclair, Essex County, N.
Y., January 3, 1864. He was the son
of Hnry H. and Anna (Badger)
Lloyd. His early education was re-
ceived in the public schools of his na-
tive state. Following his high school
graduation he matriculated at Har-
vard university and received his A. B.
degree in 1886. In 1888 he earned the
title to his masters' degree and the
degree of Ph.D. was conferred upon
him by the same university in 1893.-
The years from 1889 to 1891 were
spent in study at the universities of
Gottingen, Berlin and Heidelberg.
Upon his return to this country in
1891 Mr. Lloyd was appointed as an
instructor in the department of philos-
ophy at the University of Michigan.
The following year he was married
to Margaret E. Crocker, of Springfield,
Mass., and the next year he received
his Doctor's degree from Harvard
university.
Mr. Lloyd was an instructor in the
department of philosophy until 194,
when he was given an assistant pro-
fessorship in the same department.
This he held until 1899, when he was
raised to the rank of junior professor
of philosophy.rSince 1906 he has held
a full profesosrship.
Professor Lloyd has appeared before
the academic world as an author at
various times during his career at the
University of Michigan. In 1897 his
work on "Citizenship and Salvation"
was published and his book entitled
"Dynamic Idealism" in 1898. The next
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Rev. R. S. Laring speaks on "The
Strength of Simplicity," Unitarian
church, 10:30 o'clock.
H. V. Wann speaks on Constantinople,
Congregational church, 6:30 o'clock.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, Menorah society,
Newberry hall, 8:15 o'clock.
Rev. U. W Knepper, "The Four Fish-
ermen," Church of Christ, 10:30
o'clock.
Rev. A. W. Stalker, "The Proof You
Demand," First M. E. church, 10:30
o'clock.
"The Crucifixion," e Second Baptist
church, 10:30 o'clock.
"Doctrine of Atonement," First
Church of Christ, 10:30 o'clock.
Dr. John Seibert, "Mediterranean

GERMANS LOSE IN VOSGES
Compulsory Service Foreseen in Eng.
Land; Germans Destroy 610
Ships
London, .Oct. 16.-Reports from
Athens announce that the Russian and
Italian ministers are preparing to
leave the Greek capital. Following the
announcement of declaration of war
upon Bulgaria by Great Britain to-
day, London papers stated that if
Greece is not for the Entente she is
against it. The Morning Post advo-
cates the blockade of the entire Greek
coast. One journal states that com-
pulsory military service is likely to be
installed soon.
French Regalin Ground
Paris, Oct. 16.--French troops to-
day were able to win bacj all the
ground lost to the Germans on the
summit of Harmansweilerkopf in the
Vosges, and to make other slight ad-
vances. This brace, on the allies' side
follows a day of slight German suc-
cesses.
The Hague (via London), Oct. 16.-
A report from Berlin says that the
Germans have destroyed 610 ships,
both naval and merchant marine, since
the beginning of the war.
New York, Oct. 16.-All telegraphic
connections with Bulgaria were cut
off today by the British authorities.
New York, Oct. 16.--German repre-
sentatives denied 'that a treaty be-
tween Germany and Bulgaria was
made' last July, in which Bulgaria
would receive Macedonia and Salon-
iki if she entered with the Teutons.
The British, however, have threatened
to publish the treaty.
Jap Warships to Carry ail
Washington, Oct. 16.-In two weeks
the United States 'will be obliged to
rely upon Japanese vessels to trans-
port all our mail to the Philippines
and all Pacific ports. Practically all
American ships, it is reported, will be
forced to cease' traffic because of La
Follette's new seaman's law.
New York, Oct. 16.--A report to the
Presbyterian board of foreign mis-
sions says that 70,000 destitute Arme-
nians are now at Tabriz, Persia.
Villa Not Dead .
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 16.--Villa Is-
not dead, after all. He- is reported
today to be moving upon Juarez.
ADMINISTRATlON WILL
SUPPORT.HM EES

PEACH
IN

PROVES TO BE STAR
FIRST GRIDIRON BATTLE

CORNELIUS DROPS BALL WITH
TOUCHDOWN PRACTICALLY
ASSURED
Michigan's All-Fresh football team
battled Ypsi Normal to a 0-0 tie in
Ithe curtain-raiser on Ferry field yes-
terday afternoon. Offensive play on
both sides was completely overshad-
owed by the excellent defense which
both sides exhibited, as few first
downs were made by either side. Fum-
bles cost the new men the game, the
most costly. being charged to Corne-
lius, who, while dashing around right
end on Ypsi's two-yard line, dropped
the ball with a touchdown practically
assured.
Peach, who was easily the star of
the dav.o oe ened un hostilities by kick-

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
STATE AND WASHINGTON STREET
ARTHUR W. STALKER, D. D., Pastor
Services at 16:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. M.
Topics: "THE PROOFS YOU DEMAND," "NEUTRALITY"
EARL V. MOORE, Organist, and Musical Director; ADA
GRACE JOHNSON Soprano; ALICR BLITON, Contralto;
ODRA PATTON, Tenor; STANLEY WILSON, Bass.

Washington Girls Denote Approval by
Forming Nation-wide Organiza-
tion to Aid in Equippiug Men
Waiington, Oct. 16.-The adminis-
tration here today made a definite
statement that they will support the
proposed plans for national defense.
The plans for both army and navy
will be approved before being submit-
ted to congress. The plans for the
army as drawn up by Secretary of
War, Garrison include a war footing
by 1922 of 1,200,000 men.
In order to show, their approval of
the administration's plan for prepared-
ness, a group of girls here have deter-
mined to form a nation-wide organ-
ization to make kits, knitted top shirts,
handkerchiefs and the like, and also
to gather supplies of needles, buttons
and thread for soldiers.

,

en ® n s

Ll!u y, v p N.l~l1LGaN +..

TAPPAN LECTURE

The

Sunday

" The

Presbyterian

fediterranean
By the ORIENTAL TRAVELLER

Lands"

Evening 7:45

Church.

Oct. 17th

D R.

JOHN

A.

SEIBE RT

I ii.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan