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March 24, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-24

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THE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
T HECAMPUS

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Phones:-Editorial 2414
IBusiness 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YOK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 121.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

---.

°i "'

r A W WITE,
09, ARRESTED ON
POISONING CHARILE
INVOLVED IN FINANCIAL CON-
PLICATIONS WHILE HERE
IN UNIVERSITY
ARSENIC SHOWN BY AUTOPSY

Peck, Latest Victim, Was Visiting
Home of Dr. Waite in New
York City

at

Dr. Arthur Warren Waite, '09D, who
is under arrest in New York City
pending investigation into the deaths
of his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
John E. Peck, of Grand Rapids, was in-
volved in financial complications and
was brought before the university au-
thorities while a student here, ac-
cording to a statement made by Dr.
M. L. Ward of the Dental College yes-
terday afternoon. Waite Was disci-
plined at that time and forced to make
a public apology before his class.
A secret autopsy on the body of
millionaire Peck at Grand Rapids last
Saturday revealed the presence of ar-
senic in his stomach. Peck'was visit-
ing at the home of his son-in-law in
New York City on March 12, when
he was taken sick and' died within a
few hours. No suspicion was aroused
until the receipt of a mysterious tele-
gram by Percy Peck, son of the dead
man, in Grand Rapids, warning him
that the death of his father resulted
from other than natural causes.
The autopsy was performed by Dr.
Schurtz, a close friend of the family,
and the stomach and contents sent
to Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, head of the
medical school, for analysis. District
Attorney Swann of New York was im-
mediately informed that arsenic had
1een found in large quantities. Rep-
resentatives from the district attor-
ney's office began work on the case
at once and soon gathered the string
of circumstantial evidence which re-
sulted in Waite being taken into cus-
tody yesterday.
Additional evidence in the case is
found in the fact that Mrs. John E.
Peck, wife of the Grand Rapids mil-
lionaire, died at Waite's home in New
York City but a few weeks before her
husband, and under practically identi-
cal circumstances. Mrs. Pecks' body
was brought to Detroit and cremated
under instructions given the family
by Waite.
Dr. A. W. Waite, who is 28 years
old, was born in Grand Rapids and
attended the Central high school in
that city. He afterward entered the
University of Michigan, enrolling in
the dental department. Reports have
appeared crediting him with being an
exceptional student and winning a
scholarship abroad, but according to
Dr. Ward, of the Dental College,
Waite was a very ordinary student and
did not distinguish himself in his work.
Dr. Ward said that no doubt his two
years' study abroad had rendered him
more proficient in his profession than
lie was at the time of his graduation.
While in the university Waite took
an active part in class athletics, but
was not popular on the campus, hav-
ing been accused at various times of
participating in underhanded deals.
The records of the Delta Sigma Delta
fraternity, of which he was a member,
show that he was not expelled from
that body, as was rumored yesterday.
Detectives on the case are attempt-
ing to prove that although Dr. Waite
possessed a diploma from this univer-
sity, he has been practicing head sur-
gery in New York without a license.
Rumors are persistent to the effect
that Waite has been leading a double:
life, but up to yesterday afternoon the
other woman involved had not been
. found.
]RITISH PROMISE PORTUGAL
AlD SHOULD NECESSITY ARISE
Paris, Mar. 23. - The Portuguese
minister of foreign affairs read in the
Chamber of Deputies today a com-
munication addressed by Sir Edward
Grey, British secretary of state for for-

eign affairs, to the Portuguese govern-
ment which said :"Portugal should have
fiull confidence that its ancient ally
will give it all possible aid should the
necessity arise."

ATTACK HINDEBURG ON
FRONT 200 MILES LONG
Great N timber of Men Being Used by
RIssians; Attack German Rail-
way, Position
London, Mar. 23.-Von Hindenburg's
front is being heavily assailed by the
Russians on a gradually widening line
reaching nearly 200 miles in a south-
easterly curve from Riga. The Ger-
man war office today reported heavy
Russian assaults in the region of Ja-
cobstadt and along the Mitau-Jacob-
stadt railroad.
North of Widey and in the region
of Lakes Norocz and Wisnieu, south
of Dvinsk, General Kuropatkin is roll-
ing up heavy forces to the attack
against the German railway position.
The German war T~fice claims the at-
tack has been rfulsed. A further
extension of the eastern front fighting
is bringing into action forces almost
as large as those engaged in the strug-
gle for Verdun.
FRENCH WAR STATEMENT
Paris, Mar. 23.-The official state-
ment of the war office tonight says:
"North of the Aisne we directed sep-
arate tires on the German works on
the plateau of Dauciero. In the Ar-
gonne we carried out numerous con-
centrations of our fire on the enemy's
organizations, and against the -road and
the railways of the Argonne and on the
Malancourt wood.
West of the Meuse the bombardment
was in the region of Malancourt and
against our front of Bethincourt, Le
Mort Homme, and Cumiere.
East of the Meuse and in the Woevre
the artillery action developed a cer-
tain intensity. There was no infantry
action during the course of the day."
GERMANS REPORT SUCCESS
Berlin, Mar. 23.-German successes
near the forest of Avocourt have been
completed by the occupation of the
French point of support on the moun-
tain ridge southeast of Haucourt, an
official report says. About 450 per-
sons were taken.
LAW CLASS PICKS PINE CANES
Decide Not to Petition State Exam-
iners for Special Examination
Pine wood canes with an Indian
head were adopted as the official class,
canes by the senior law class at a
meeting yesterday afternoon. The head
of the cane may be changed to that of
a badger at the discretion of the com-
mittee.
The class resolved not to petition
the Michigan board of state law exam-
iners for a special examination in July,
considering it better to wait until Oc-.
tober to take the regular examination
given at that time.
A motion was passed levying 50 cent
dues on the class.
POLICE SECURE MAN IN TOLEDO
WANTED FOR GRAND LARCENY
After a pursuit lasting more than
two years, Chief of Police Pardon has
located William Farnsworth in the
city of Toledo. Farnsworth is want-
ed here for grand larceny. Chief Par-
don starts for Toledo this morning
with requisition papers and will bring
his man back to Ann Arbor for trial.
PICK MEN FOR ORATORY FINALS

Casto, Simpson and Teegarden Chosen
to Speak on Prohibition
G. D. Casto, grad., J. -R. Simpson,
'18, and H. B. Teegarden, '17, were
selected from the five men who spoke
in the first preliminary of the annual
prohibition contest in room B of the
Law building last night to appear in
the final contest, which will be held
at 7:30 o'clock next Monday night in
the same room.
The second preliminary, in which
James Schermerhorn, '18, W. M. Hop-]
kins, '17, C. P. Anderson, '17, H. Wag-
enseil, '16, and C. E. Hutton, '17, will
participate, will be held at 4:00
o'clock this afternoon at the same#
place. The three men chosen from
this contest will meet with those se-
lected last night in the final contest.
The winner of the final will speak
in the state Prohibition. contest at
Ypsilanti,. April 21.

PLN TO INCLUDE
WOMEN IN COUNCIL
Committee of Student Council Mem-
bers to Confer With Women
Represntatives
DESIRE C L 0 S E R COOPERATION
Plans which may result in women
representation on the student council
were discussed at the meeting of that
organization last night, and a reso-
lution was passed calling for the.ap-
pointment of a committee of three
council men, one of whom is to be
the president, to confer with two rep-
resentatives to be named by the Wom-
eis' Judiciary Council on matters of
interest to the whole campus.
At first, this joint committee will
refer problems and movements to their
respective organizations, but President
Henry Rummell of the Council st'ated
that this combination for the closer
cooperation of university men and
women would undoubtedly result in
the election of women members to the
Council itself.
All- Publication
Dance a Success
Entire Program Excellent; Men Inter-
mingle;:Night Be Annual -
Affair
As was expected, the All-Publica-
tion Dance held last evening at Gran-
ger's academy, was a decided success.
The entire program was excellent,
from the music by Fischer's orchestra
to the saxophone solo rendered by
"Wap" John. The features of the
evening were the two numbers by the
Michigan Concert Quartet.
The literary men of the campus
without a doubt proved their ability
as followers of Vernon Castle, as well
as journalists. The congeniality with
which the men from the various pub-
lications, from The Daily to the Stu-
dents' Directory, intermingled, only.
adds material proof to the statement
that the publication dance should be
made an annual affair.
OPEN MEETING FAVORS NEW
FORM OF GOVERNMENT FOR CITY
One hundred men, mostly of the la-
boring class, attended a meeting in
Trades Union hall last night, where,
an open discussion upon the proposed
city manager plan of local government
was held. Mr. E. C. Freeman ex-
plained the difference between the ex-
isting form of city rule and the com-
mission form.
The other speaker was Prof. R. T.
Crane, of the political science depart-
ment, who told of the different forms
of government and explained the na-
ture and the value of each. In par-
ticular he advocated the city mana-
ger plan, which the Civic association
has recommneded to the city for adop-
tion.
COLORADO AND MONTANA CLUBS
TO HOLD JOINT SOCIAL EVENTS
There was an abundance of good
cheer of the hearty western kind at the
informal dinner given by the Colorado
club at the Union last evening. The
dinner .was the first of a series of
events planned for men from Colo-
rado. Another dinner will be given
at the Union April 25.
At a short business session after

the dinner, plans for holding meetings
and social events jointly with the
Montana club were approved. A union
of all the western clubs and western
men is sought by the Colorado club.
Committee Appoints Four Teachers
The appointment committee has
placed the following teachers: Edith
Hoyle, '16, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan,
American History and Civics; Nellie
McGregor, '16, Grayling, Mich., Latin
and German; Aris Van Deusen, '16,
Battle Creek, Mich., Commercial Work;
Fay Shurte, '14, Whitecloud, Mich.,
English.
Canadian Club Holds Dance at Packard
Canadian club members danced at.
Packard academy last night. Chap-
erons were Dr. H. H. Cummings and
Mrs. Cummings, Dr. R. W. Bunting and
Mrs. Bunting, and Prof. T. J. MacKay-
anagh and Mrs. MacKavanagh. 1

STATISTICL SOCIETY
FOUNDED AT MICHIGA
To Be Known as "Actuarial and Sta-
tistical Society of the Univer-
sity of Michigan"
The first college actuarial and sta-
tistical society in the United States
has been formed on the Michigan
campus.
Off.icial announcement of the or-
ganization of a society, to be known
as the "Actarial and Statistical So-
ciety of the University of Michigan,"
was made yesterday. Application for
recognition has already been made to
the Committee on Student Affairs.
The society will hold monthly meet-
ings at which time papers on subjects
pertaining to the actuarial and sta-
tistical side of mathematics will be
read by the members.
Michigan. was not only the first col-
lege in the country to take up this
phase of mathematics, but has also
one of the largest and best-known
curriculums in this branch. The pur-
pose of the organization is to bring
about a closer community of interest
between the students in these courses,
and with the graduates from this cur-
riculum who are now holding positions
in the business world.
The organization has the hearty
support of the mathematics faculty
and Prof. J. W. Glover and Dr. C. H.
Forsythe were elected honorary mem-
bers, at the first meeting of the so-
ciety held several days ago. At this
time, the following officers were cho-
sen: President, Stanford Z. Rothschild,
'16; vice president, Carl Mitcheltree,
grad.; secretary and treasurer, H. B.
Sturtevant, '17. The other charter
members of the society are R. R.
Lounsbury, '16, E. A. Porter, '16, L.
C. Cortwright, '17, R. F. Reitter, '17,
E. L. Shinnick, '17, E. W. Henne, '17,
A. R. Thompson, '16, W. G. Brown-
rigg, '17, and Blanche Williams, '17.
These persons were selected from
the students now taking courses in
actuarial and statistical work. In
addition, all students who have grad-
uated from this department in the
past are regarded as members of the
society.
Action on several other candidates
for membership in the society will be
taken at the next meeting of the or-
ganization, which will be held on
Thursday, April 6.
PICK YIMCACOMMITTEES
BALLOTING ON OFFICERS FOR
NEXT YEAR TAKES PLACE ON
THURSDAY
Louis J. Reimann, president of t he
University Y. M. C. A., yesterday ap-
pointed the following men on the elec-
tion committee: W. O. Henderson,
'16E, Dean Taylor, '16E, Whitney
Moore, 'SE, Ralph Yates, and Don
Ogilbee, '16L.
The election of officers for next
year will be held Thursday of next
week. Cards containing the names
of the nominees will be mailed to
all members Tuesday, and these bal-
lots are to be dropped in ballot boxes
placed for the purpose at various
points on the campus, on the day of
election.
A special committee to discuss Y. M.
C. A. plans for the coming year was
appointed yesterday. The following
men were named: N. E. Pinney, '16,
Irwin C. Johnson, '16, E. Judson, '16E,
PbIl Lovejoy, '16, and Waldo Hunt, '16.

HAY ARMY BILL PASSES HOUSE
Goes to Senate Virtually as Drafted
by Committee
Washington, Mar. 23.-The Hay bill,
providing for a regular army with a
full 9trength of 140,000 fighting men
instead of the present 100,000, passed
the House late today by a vote of
102 to 2. It goes to the Senate for
immediate consideration, virtually as
drafted by the House committee.
CARD OF THANKS
To the Ironwood club and to all
of the friends who were so kind to
our son and to us during his illness,
we wish to.express our sincere appre-
ciation.
Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Anderson
and family.

.K

RELASE STORY OF H
OF UNITED STATES
COUNCIL WOULD DO AWAY
WITH MID-WEEK DANCES
The Student Council favors the
abolition of all mid-week dances
from Monday to Thursday, in-
clusive. At the instigation of
university women, a resolution
to that effect was passed at the
meeting last night. A similar
resolution was recently passed
by the Women's Judiciary Coun-
cil.
LAST HOME CONCERTIO
MUSICA CLUBS SUCCESS
Midnight Sons Quartet Scores Hit of
Performance With Trap
Door Exit
A crowd of approximately 2,000
people that filled the lower floor of
Hill auditorium to its capacity and left
a good showing for the balcony, heard
one of the best concerts that the com-
bined musical clubs have ever put
on in Ann Arbor.
This perfomance is the last one that
the clubs will give before their west-
ern trip and they outdid themselves
to please the generous crowd that
turned out to witness their efforts.
The feature of the entertainment
was the stunt performed by the Mid-
night Sons' quartet. To the final
strains of the "old 'cordeen" song the
four singers slowly disappeared be-
neath the stage in a manner that
might have been suggested by the
burial scene in "Hamlet."
Scanlon's work in the Mandolin
club sextet was well appreciated by
the listeners, and the five who support-
ed him came in for their share of
commendation.
While the Varsity quartet had noth-
ing in the way of sleight of hand
to offer, their work in the song "Jenks'
Vegetable Compound" was a clever
combination of good singing and fun
that drew several encores.
The Popular Medley by the Mandolin
club is up to the best standard and got
plenty of applause.
Among the more serious numbers
Sikes' singing in the "Cross of Fire"
number was well received, and was
one of the best on- the program.
The receipts for the concert will
exceed those for the final concert
last year, but they fall below those of
1914. It will not be possible to take
any extra men on the trip with the
money now at hand, which means that
about 26 musicians will have that
reward for their work this season.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Increasing cloudiness and warm-
er; probably local snow or rain with
moderate south winds.

TODAY
4:00 o'clock-Sophomore lit class
meeting, Economics building.
5:45 o'clock-Dr. Iden's Bible class-
es hold banquet at Church of Christ.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, room
401, U hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster hall, Law building.
7:30 o'clock -Jeffersonian society
meets, Jeffersonian hall, Law building.
8:00 o'clock-Track meet social, Mc-
Millan hall.
9:00 o'clock-Fischer dance, Michi-
gan Union.
TOMORROW
7:30.o'clock-Upper Room Bible
class meets, 444 S. State stret.
7:80 o'clock-M. S. N. C. club meets,
Newberry hall.
8:00 o'clock - Nippon club meets,
Newberry hall.
9:00 o'clock-Michigan Union dance,
Michigan Union:1

TROOPS CROSSED
SEARCH 11OF BANDITS
RE-EN FORCEWNTS DAILY BEING
BROUG IT. TO FORCES IN
Elif :FIELD
ASSEMBLE AT BOUNDARY LINE
Edward S. Gorrell, Missing Aviator,
Found Uninjured; Forced to
Alighit
BULLETIN
El Paso, Mar. 23.- Xilla was at-
tacked and defeated tonight at
Santa G ertrudes by Carranza
troops, according to a dispatch re-
ceived by General Gavira in Juar-
ez.
General Gavira says he received
authentic information that fol-
lowing the skirmish at Santa Clara
earlier in the day, where Colonel
Canos' command had defeated
Villa, the bandit chieftain was
pursued and again attacked late
tonight at Santa Gertrudes and
again was defeated.
Villa left several men and
wounded bandits on the field and
General Gavira said 100 horses
were captured from him by the
Carranzistas,
From Santa Gertrudes Villa
fled to El Oso, 'where lie was re-
ported tonight reorganizing 'his
torces. Santa Gertrudes is a
ranch settlement in the Daerrro
district not far from Naiquipa.
Headquarters of the United States
Army Force, Mexico, in Camp on San
Miguel River near Colonia Dublan,
March 22, by Courier to Columbus,
New Mexico, March 23.-It is from
this point as a base of operations that
General Pershing and the United
States troops are conducting the
search for Villa.
A strong line of communications.
stretching from here to the border,
is daily bringing re-enforcements and
supplies to. the field forces. Civilian
scouts. Mormon guides, and native
spies are providing information upon
which the man hunt is being con--.,
ducted.
Tell How Force Crossed Border
How, with the watchful waiting
band, the United States force pushed
across the border at two different
places and reached this point by dif-
ferent routes, is a story just released,
by the military censor.
When the first column crossed the
border Wednesday, Marc 15, Mexican
spies, as expected, carried word of it
farther south that its coming was
no surprise. But with attention at-
tracted at that point General Persh-
ing at the head of the flying column
of light marching troops secretly
manoeuvered his second dash across
the line from unexpected point on tle
border.
Assemble at Boundary Line
Trace the international' boundary
line west from El Paso to the point
where it makes the first sudden jog
to the south. In this odd 'corner of
the United States, 50 miles from the
closest railroad, troops from various
points along the border had been as-
sembling for three days. At the High-

lonesome and Culbersome ranches,
these forces were ready from the
march late Wednesday night. Upon
the arrival of General Pershing short-
ly after midnight the march to the
south was started.
We crossed the border Thursday
morning north of Ojo Oqua Blanco
after the column lost a guide, Harley
Tracey, the border rider who came out
of Mexico at Columbus on Wednesday
and brought with him the last report
of the whereabouts of Villa. Tracey
struck into the mountains to the east.
Column Under Way Friday
By daybreak on Friday the column
was once more under way, General
Pershing dividing his force into two
commands. Ten miles across the plain
from Ojitos General Pershing's com-
mand turned into the hills. It was a
rugged, <uninviting skyline that the
column faced in the blistering glare
of the sun. We soon reached the wa-
terhole of Casas de Janos. The col-
' (Continued on Page Eight)

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