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March 23, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-23

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TELEGUAPH SERVICE BY-ri
NEW YORK SUX

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VOLI. XVI. No. 120.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ANN ARfO MICHIAN, TI URISDAY, MARCH 23, 1916.

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CZAR'S MEN TAKE USCIEZKO
t rmtan; in ;WIetr 'Thiatr iiMtake
Gain : ' fie laonart on
ense Front
London, Mar. 22.-The Russian of-
fensive at the three vital points of
the eastern battle line between Riga
and Dwinsk east of Vilna and on the
IBukowina border is being pushed with
might and main.
The German war office insists that
the new attack against Field Marshal
von Hindenburg's line in the north,
which together with the offensive
against the Austrians in the south-
west is aimed 't indirectly relieving
the Crown Prince's pressure against
Verdun by forcing the withdrawal of
troops from the west, has thus far
been unsuccessful and has caused the
attackers enormous losses.
Berlin insists that the only gain
made by the Russians in the new of-
-fensive was that in the Lake Narorcz
region, where the Germans gave up
a far protruding salient. The German
war office emphasized that the Rus-
sians' attae4{ are continuing.
More favorable from the Russian
point of view seems to be the de-
velopment of the new offensive in the
southwest. The Russians' energy is
concentrated upon the strongly for-
tified approaches to Czernowitz, the
Bukowina capital.
The Czar's troops captured yester-
day the Usciezko bridgehead, a posi-
tion which the Austrians had stubborn-
ly held for the last six months. The
town o Usciezko already is in Rus-
sian hands. The Russians are now
again seriously menacing Zalecieski,
an important railroad intersection-.
This is practically the key to Czer
naowitz. Dispatches received here by
way of Rome report the evacuation of
the capital of Bukowina.
Germanus Make Slight Advance
Paris, Mar. 22.-After a particularly
heavy bombardment extending through
the night on the small iaucourt hill
a little over half a mile southwest of
the village of Malancourt on the west
bank of the Meuse, the Germans to-
day succeeded in gaining a foothold
on the height.
This was one of a series of attempts
made by the Germans to advance in
this region today and the only one of
the series to gain success. The bom-
bardment covered the region of Malan-
court, Esnes, Haucourt Hill, and Hill
304. The French guns relied, di-
recting especial attention to the Bois
de Malancourt and the Bois de Avo-
court, the southeastern part of the
Malancourt wood.j
SPECIAL METING OF SENIOR
LITS ANNOUN (E I FOR ThODAY
A special meeting of the men of the
senior lit class will be held at 4:00
o'clock this afternoon in Tappan hall
for the purpose of reconsidering the
vote taken at the last meeting on the
matter of class canes. This is in re-
sponse to a petition urging a resub-
mission of the question. All men of
the class are requested to be present
in order that the vote taken may rep-
resent the majority opinion.
Toastmasters Initiate New Members
Toastmasters initiated two new men,
Harrison L. McCarthy, '17L, and Har-
old E. O'Brien, '17, at a banquet at
Catalpa Inn last night. Prof. Arthur
L. Cross was also initiated as a facul-
ty member.'

FIRE )DAMAGES LAUNDRIES
Fire broke out in the laundries
of the University yesterday aft-
ernoon at about 5:30 o'clock.
The damage, as estimated, will
not exceed $1000. The origin
of the fire is unknown.
CITY IOTERS, BALL
AT MANAGER PLAN
(itizens Oppose Form of Government
Proposed by Civic
Association

ADDITION OF 2100 SOLDIERS TO
FORCES OF IlLAMAY MEAN CALL
OF ALL MOBILE TROOPS TO BORDE

C11A1E . SIRS, 1',
niaking his last :appearance with the
Glee Club in Bill ,Iuditorium,.
SOLICIT CONTRIBUTIONS
FOR LIEAYMAGZINE
Short Stories, Poems, Essays and
Sketches Requested from Student
Body for "Inlander"
Letters have been mailed to persons
signing the petition to the Board in
dYntrol for the establishing of a lit-
erary magazine, by Waldo R. Hunt,
. editor of the new "Inlander," thank-
ing them for the interest they have
shown and asking for contributions to
the first 'numbers of the publication.
Short stories, poems, essays, sketch-
es, and articles of interest to university
men and woruen are requested. Since
the staff purposes putting the first
number on sale shortly after the spring
vacation, all copy must be in the
hands of the editors not later than
March 29. .
It was also announced last night
that Hugo Wagenseil, '16, has been
appointed business manager by the
board in Control of Publications.
Wagenseil, who is specializing in ad-
vertising, was awarded the prize in
the advertising contest last year. He
has had much practical experieince
along these lines.
The editorial staff will be selected
in a few days by Hunt, acting on
the advice of the Board in Control.
MARCH TECHNIC OUT FRIDAY
Scope of iagazine Enlarged to Include
Architectural Field
It has been the aim of the engi-
neering society to make the Michigan
Technic the best college engineering
paper in the country, and the society
feels that it has come close to its goal
in the March issue, which goes on sale
Friday morning. The scope of this is-
sue of the magazine has been enlarged
so as to take in the architectural field,
and a separate department will be
conducted hereafter for the architects.
In order to make the magazine ap-
peal more directly to the campus at
large, the articles have been written
in as non-technical a style as possible.
Numerous cartoons, cuts and illustra-
tions have been inserted, and the
Transitory Slants have been made de-
cidedly funny. The Technic will be
on sale for 25 cents at all stands and
in the engineering society rooms. It
is free to members of the society.
WINN EItS OF UNION CAMPAGN
GIVEN BANQUET LAST NIGHT
At the dinner given last evening by
the officials of the Michigan Union to
members of the winning teams in the
campus life membership campaign,
entertainment was furnished by C. G.
McGarty, '19, at the piano. Short talks
were given by J. F. Mead, '17E, and
R. W. Collins, '171E, captains of the
two winning teams, and Harry Gault,
'17L.

\\ith an offering of nine all-sar
numbers, comprising an entertainment
of unusual variety, the combined Glc
and Mandolin clubs will conclude the
local season at H ill auditorium to-
night by rendering the program which
will be used on their Vestern tour.

3
i

Full know ledge of the fact that thlPOT LIT O
selection of men to make the spring tri
trip depends upon the showing made
at rehearsals, and at this evenings juliR
concert, brought all of the mren out T "l
to the final practice in the auditorium
last night. N h iy-T o Students Will Leave To.
It is possible that a greater number merraw for Toledo and Chicago
of men may be tahln on the spring In Specil (r
trip than was at firmi anticipated.
From the opening number entitled A eonplete list of the cast, chorus,
'Wake Miss Lindy" to tile conluding orchestra and committees of "Tres
"Musical - Trust" the men piUt forth Rouge" which are to make the trip
their best efforts. to Toledo and Chicago was posted on
f the Union bulletin board last night.
lrllhi artitrIi err 'i S elloI ,.Ninety-two men will make the trip in
An innovation is provided l I the speal car, which leaves the Ann
first selection, in that both clubs Arbor station promptly at 9:15 o'clock
participate. This has never been - taroorrow morning.'
ried out before, b~cac~us o01 the in ,bil-
ity to obtain apro r balance oftoel-. e book of instructions will be hand-
btee thint slandvocal ed out to the men as soon as they get
sections. This number should prov on the train, furnishing them with all
necessary information as to the trip.
a 'winner.
Chase P. Sikes, '16, soloist, who will The rehearsal held at the Union
bid the campus farewell as an enter- last right was considered satisfactory
tainer, is at his best in "War Song," 1 by Theron D. Weaver, '16E, who will
taken from, the cantata. "Cross of assume general charge of the show
Fire.". Ne is well ,upportod. on the trip.
T'vre iibadoiu Trio to A rr A air Arrangements for berths can be
Forsythe Wheeler and Davis a the made by applying at the Union desk
Troubadour trio, who were well re- today. Yurtther information regarding
ceived at the club's novelty coillert. the til) 'an be secured by inquiring
have made a marked improven'nt at the Union desk or by calling Theron
sinlCe that time.

3
2]
to
I
I C
IV

EXPRESSES

OPINION

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C
ti
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Cl
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Widespread opposition to the city
manager form of government, as pro-
posed by the Civic association, has
lately developed among Ann Arborj
voters. Rumor is persistent to- the
effect that the eleven candidates for
position of commissioner are alieady
pledged to a recommendation of the
city manager plan, and some go so
far as to assert that the new charter!
which is supposed to be drawn up by
he commissioners after election is
already reposing in the desk of a uni-]
versity professor who has taken an
active interest in the proposed reor-
ganization of the city government.
In as much as there are but eleven
candidates for the eleven positions as
commissioner, their election is prac-
ically assured, but since these candi-
dates were picked by the Civic asso-
ciation, the feeling is prevalent that
an attempt is being made to forde the
city manager plan on the people re-
gardless of opposition. Consequent-
y, it is predicted that the voters will
restrict the operations of the new com-
mission to a rewriting of the present
charter.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the en-
gineering college, is of the opinion
that no need exists for a radical
change in the form of the city gov-
ernment at this time. Ann Arbor
has never suffered from any sort of
corrupt politics, and the only changes
thought necessary are minor changes
that make for greater efficiency.
The new charter as devised by the
commission will be presented to the
people for ratification at the regular
November elections.

GOVERNOR OF CHIUIIAHUA GOES
OVER TO BANDIT, SAYS
REPORT
EXPEDITION FACES DISASTER
Battleship Kentucky Sent to Taupico;
Two Aviators Return
Safely
BULLETIN
El Paso, Mar. 22.-Two Ame$-
can army scouts are reported to
have been killed in a brush with
Villista forces in the Elealle Nami-
quipa district of Chihuahua Ix
which the pursuit of Villa is pro.
gresslag.. Word to that effect was
received by army officers 6ere.
It was the first report of an Amer-
lean killed since the punithe ex
pedition entered Mexico.
Washington, Mar. 22.-Offjciai con-
firmation was received at the War de-
partment tonight of the defection of
Governor Herrera of Chihuahua with
2,000 troops to the cause of General
Villa. It came in a dIsaatch from
Major-General Bell at El Paso. In
the absence of authority from Secre-
tary Baker, who was not at the deart-
ment tonight, the dispatch 'was not
given out.
The news caused grave ppreheaz-
sion In army circles here. There
fear expressed that the action of HeT-
rera, who was formerly 01 'V
staff of generals, will be followed
similar defection on the part of
sympathizers.
U. S. Advance Army in
Of immediate concern to army oeir
cers is the danger which will at one
threaten General Pershing's lines"of
communication. It is expected tct
as a result of the news, additional
troops will be sent to the border wIth-
in the next twenty4our hours so that
infantry can be sent in to the support
of General Pershing. At the present
time there are available, exclusive of
field artillery and engineers, just 5,105
of the mobile force of the United States
army in this country that are not now
on the border.
These troops are scattered ftomi
coast to coast. There is also available
the mobile army composing the Porto
Rican regiments, a native organizatift,
which army officers say would be in-
valuable in Mexico.
May Call for More Tr~ops
Officials at the War departmnent
added tonight that, if necessary, the
14,000 coast artillery troops in the
United States could be drawn on, mak-
ing a total additional regular army
force of 22,212. It is also suggested
as probable that the War department'
would avail itself without delay of
the office to draw from the crack
national guard cavalry regiments of
New York, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Arizona and 'New Mexico, a total of
approximately 5,000 men.
Warning his hearers with solemn
emphasis that .the American expe i-
(Continued on Page Six)

Considerable originality is displhyed
in the popular medley mandolin selec- lrofess;I' Wenley to Speak Today
tion which was arranged by Earl V. Professor R. M. Wenley will deliver
Moore, with the J-Hop favorite; "Un- a tall this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock
derneath the Stars" as the underlying in St. Andrew's church on the sub-
theme. ject, "Faith." This is the second of
The two old favorite "Midnight a series of lenten vesper talks by pro-
Sons" anad Varsity quartets vie with fessor WCnley under the general
each other as harmony producers, heading "The Personal Element in
each giving one selection. Religion."
Psychopathic Hospital Enters
Social Service Field in Detroit

Within the past few
copathic Hospital of

weeks the Psy-
tile university

has put into operation a new Out-pa-
tient service in the city of Detroit for
the treatment of mental diseases. The
work has been established in con-
nection with the Wayne County Pro-
bate court, and will have its head-
quarters in the new Juvenile Deten-
tion Home, which is to be opened to-
morrow.
The service was organized by Dr.
Albert M. Barrett, professor of psy-
chiatry in the university, and director
of the Psychopathic I lospi.tal, and the
work will be carried on under his
supervision. Dr, Harold S. Hulbert,
assistant physician at the Psychopath-
ic Hospital, will have immediate con-
trol of the work in Detroit and will
spend one day each week in charge of
the offices there.
The primary purpose of the new Out-
patient department is to act as an aid
to the Probate and Juvenile courts of
Wayne County. From these courts all
cases of juvenile delinquincy in which

the question of mental defectiveness or
responsibility arises, may be referred
to the service for examination and di-
agnosis.'
The Psychopathic hospital here is
anong the first organizations of the
country to undertake a work of this
kind. Out-patient service is a nat-
ural development of the hospital's re-
searches into the causes and cure of
lmen~tal diseases, and it is realized
that the establishment of this branch
will place at the disposal of the people
of Michigan, expert advice and tech-
nical knowledge on a subject that is
too little understood.
For the past three weeks the psy-
chopathic service in Deti'oit has been
housed in temporary offices in the As-
sociatea Charities building. Although
no open clinics are held, those in com-
mand of the work express their belief
that more efficient service will be ren-
dered by working in conjunction with
esta)blished associations already in
touch with the social life of the com-
nunity.

WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin.'
ity: Generally fair, with continued
cold north winds.
TODAY
4:00 o'clock-Senior lit meeting,;
Tappan hall.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of the senior
law class, room B, Law building.
5:45 o'clock-Colorado club dinner,
Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock-Poetry club meets, 518
Monroe.
8:00 o'clock-Spring concert of Glee
and Mandolin clubs, Hill auditorium.
9:00 o'clock--Canadian club dance,
Packard academy.
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-Sophomore lit class
meeting, Economics building.
5:45 o'clock-Dr. Iden's Bible class-
es hold banquet at Church of Christ.
9:00 o'clock-Fischer dance, Michi-
gan Union.

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Ilow

i

I

GLEE AND MANDoOLi CLUB CONCERT

251e

EIGHT

O'CLOCK

TO

NIGHT

5c

HILL AUDITORIUM

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