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March 19, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-19

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THE DAILY
-100 I
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
TIHE CAMPUS

W
: y
4
i839 X
k

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
ELEGRAPH SERVICE BY 'THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 117.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

SUNDAY, MARCH 19, 1916.'

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ALL-FRESK TEAM
AND DETROIT -'
IN COEMEET
YEARLINGS PLACE IN EVERY
EVENT EXCEPT QUARTER
MILE
ROBINSON STARS IN CONTEST
Fox Takes Measure of Former Michi-
gan Man at Tape in Middle
Distance Race
Doped as certain losers and running
on a small track counting 44 laps to
the mile, Michigan's freshmen gave
tne Detroit "Y" track men the scare
of their lives last night when they
held the older men to a 45 to 36
score. The yearlings succeeded in'
placing in every event except the1
quarter mile.}
The best performances of the even-
ing were Robinson's mark of 60 4-5
seconds in the quarter and McDon-
ald's mile time of 4 minutes 52 sec-
onds. Fox's work in the half mile,
when he let "Al" Robinson set the
pace until the last lap and then beat
him to the tape, was another note-
worthy event.
The summary:
25-yard-dash-A. S. Robinson (D)-,
first; Parks (M), second; Hrabak (M),
third. Time, 1-5.

Low Hurdles-Babbit
Bruch (M), second; A.
(D). third. Time, 3 3-5.

(D), first;
D. Robinson

High Hurdles-Babbitt (D), first;
Hicks (M), second; Bruch (M), third.
Time. 3 4-5.
Shot Put-Curtis (D), first; Cudlip
(M), second; Peach (M), third. 44
feet 11 1-2 inches.
Half Mile-Fox (M), first; A. S.
Robinson (D), second; Berdan (D),
third. Time, 2:17 1-5.
High Jump-Haigh (M), first; Bell
(i), second; A. D. Robinson (D),
third. 5 feet 7 inches.
Quarter Mile-A. S. Robinson (D),
first; O'Donnell (D), second; Jans'(D),
third. Time, 60 4-5.
Mile-McDonald (D), first; Comlo-
quoy (M), second; Fuess (M), third.
Tir e, 4:52.
Pole Vault--Jacobs (D), first; Wong
fMt. second; Onorato (M), third. 10
ft 6 in.
DIXIE CLUB HOLDS SMOKER
AT UNION TUESDAY EVENING1
The Dixie club of the university will
hold a smoker at the Michigan Union
Tuesday evening, March 21,, at 7:45
o'clock. Prof. W. B. Phillips of the,
history department will deliver a
short address, and F. W. Wood, '16,.
will speak for the club. A musical
program will also be arranged. W_.
L. Owen, '17L, will preside.=
Nichigan Dames
Will Hold Penc
Nembers to Entertain Their Husbands
at Their Annual Indoor Party
Monday Evening
Michigan Dames will hold their third
annual indoor picnic at 7:30 o'clock
tomorrow evening.in Newberry hall.'
As has been the custom in other year 3,
the members will entertain their hu-
bands at this event.
Many old fashioned games have beta
included in the program by the conm-
inittee in charge of which Mrs. Stacy
Guild is the chairman. Refreshments.
have not been overlooked. The pic-
nic will last from 7:30 o'clock to 10:00
o'clock and all members are urged to
come and bring their husbands.

REV. E. T. CHAUNCEY
lector of Trinity Church, Columbus, 0.
Noted Rector to
Talk 1Twie Taod'y
Rev. E. F. Chauncey preaches at St.
Andrew's Church as First of
pre-Lenten Speakers
As the first of a number of special
preachers who will speak on the re-
maining Sundays of the lenten season,
the Rev. E. F. Chauncey will speak
this morning at 10:30 o'clock in St.
Andrew's Episcopal church on "Liv-
ing Epistles." He will also preach
at the evening service at 7:30 o'clock
on "The Challenge of the Impossible."
Mr. Chauncey is rector of Trinity
Church, Columbus, Ohio, one of the
oldest and best known parishes of the
middle west. He is noted as an es-
pecially vigorous preacher among the
younger men of the Episcopal church
and during recent years he has served
as special preacher in many of the
most important pulpits of the middle
west.
At the service next sunaay, the Rt.
Rev. Charles D. Williams, Bishop of
Michigan, will preach at St. Andrew's
church and administer the rite of con-
firmation. In the evening a special
musical service has been arranged by
the vested choir.
Smith to S peak
at Union Service
Noted Y. ?. C. A. Worker to Address
Audience in Hil Auditorium
This Evening
Fred B. Smith, of New 'Yo.rk, will
speak at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
Union services in Hill Auditorium. Mr.
Smith is a leading New York business
man, assistant to the president of the
H. W. John Manville Co. He is an ex-
perienced speaker to young men, hav-
ing been for many years connected
with the international Y. M. C. A.
Mr. Smith will speak on "Impressions
of a World Tour." During a great
Y. M. C. A.campaign in 1899 and 1900
he spoke to big audiences in all the
principal cities in the world. In his
address this evening he will tell of his
experiences in this and other trips.
Mr. Smith's last visit to Ann Arbor

OPERA NMS BIG
OVATION SATURDAY
'nv Perie rmsuces of 'Tres Rouge"
Ar Presented Before ,a-
pacity Houses
JOHN AND GOIRNETZKY HONORED
Featured by the abandon induced by
a lour-night run, "Tres Rouge" closed
its local engagement last night before
a capacity audience made up largely
of mothers, sisters and best girls from
out of town.
If there were "tight places" in Wed-
nesday's performance they were all
used up before last night, for both
chorus and cast had acquired stage
presence to a superlative degree. Fur-
red and bepowdered guests in the boxes
withstood a rapid fire of flirtatious
glances, wafted across the foot-lights
with unconcealed directness, by the
tight corseted show girls.
Many of the muttered phrases, on
the part of the entertainers, intended
only for the stage, were discernible
to mediocre lip readers, and some-
times clearly audible sentences, never
written into the lines, reached five
rows back from the orchestra pit.
The ponies were the worst cut ups
of the lot. Daringly immodest, they
delighted in showing frequent flashes
of silk hosiery and dizzying expanses
of the ruffles which gave substance
'to the light dancing skirts. One of
them even threatened to break up one
of the tableaux by boosting a red-
coated and white-trousered gentle-
man from his place beside Auburnia.
With tfie final curtain, Wap John
was hauled unceremoniously from the
wings and Gornetzky was boosted
over the footlights from the orchestra
pit, to share in the impromptu dance
made up of wigless "women" and hat-
less men.
All men taking part in the opera in
committee, cast, or chorus capacities
are requested to report at the Michi-
gan Union and sign Director Morgan's
score.
FIVE MEDICS GET "A" GRADE
Announcement Just Made of Honor
Students for Last Semester
In announcing the honor students
for last semester the medical school!
was overlooked. In spite of the fact
that the medics are required to put
in more time than other students,
they are able to boast of five all "A"'s.
Of this number two are juniors, Lynn
A. Hoag, Ann Arbor, and Lester C.
Todd, of Detroit, both carrying the
equivalent of 24 hours. The sopho-
mores are: Ray M. Greenthal, Detroit,'
and Washington P. Stone, North East,
Pa., with 22 hours to their credit.
The freshman honor goes to a woman,
Elsie Backus, Ann Arbor.
All of these examinations are taken
under the honor system as has been
the case ever since 1901, when the
honor system was officially establish-
ed in the medical school. This year
they have introduced the system in
recitations to do away with prompting
and open note books. Both systems
have been very successful.
Noted Woman Writer Dies in London
London, Mar. 18.-Mrs. Sorankan,

1leven members of the senior law
class were elected yesterday to the Or-
der of the Coif, national law honor so-
ciety, by the faculty of the Law School.
All of those elected but one, Albert J.
Mickelson, '16L, are possessors of A. B.
degrees, six being graduates of the lit-
erary college of the university. Hollace
M. Reid. '16L, also has earned an A. M.
degree from Princeton University in
addition to his bachelor's degree.
The list of those chosen to the order
is as follows:
Lyle M. Clift, A. B.
Eugene R. McCall, A. B., Harvard
University.'
Albert J. Mickelson.
William L. Miller, A. B., Mt. Union
College.
Arthur A. Morrow, A. B., Bethany
College.
William C. Mullendore, A. B.
Hollace M. Reid. A. B., Roanoke Col-
lege, A. M., Princeton University,
Werner W. Schroeder. A. B.
Laurence M. Sprague, A. 13.
harry B. Sutter, A. B:
Renville Wheat, A. B.
A dinner, at which the first meeting
of the new mermbers will take place,
will be held within a few weeks. The
annual open meeting and the annual
banquet of the order will take place
in May.
~-7
U S- STRIVE
NexicaNi and American Authorities
Believe Clash With Villa
Means Explosion
VILLA )ll'STERING HIS FORCES
San .Antonio, Texas, Mar. 18.-A
clash between Villa forces with the
cavalrymen of General Pershing, now
near Casas Grandes, would cause an
explosion in the tense conditions in
the border provinces of Mexico. This
is the general belief of many refugees
who have fled from Mexico. Both
Mexican and United States authori-
ties are trying to prevent any such
explosion.
Statements issuing from Fort Sam
Houston believe that the decisive crit-
ical stage of relations between the:
two nations may be reached within
several hours.

* * , [1

*
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*;:
* e
*;e

RESULTS OF MICHIGAN-COR-
NELL TWO-MILE RELAY
MICHIGAN WINS.
TIME, 7:56 3-5.
RECORD WITHIN ONE SEC-
OND OF COLLEGIATE MARK'
ESTABLISHED BY PRINCE-
TON AT THE PENNSYLVANIA
RELAYS ON FRANKLIN FIELD,
APRIL 24, 1915.

*
*:
:t

*

4. *:

* '~''~''k * * * *

Iowa State In
Injured in Clash

F~acultty
for

State

Militia CAlled Out to Prevent
Rush Held in Defiance
of Faculty Orders

Two Iowa State College students
were wounded in a clash between thej
State militia and the student body,
March 17. The collegians attempted
to hold a rush in defiance of the iac-
ulty orders and a troop of National
Guard were called out to prevent .them.
In the riot that ensued the troops fired
upon the students. Feeling runs high
at Ames as a result.'
SECOND DANCE GIVEN BY STU-
DENT COUNCIL WELL ATTENDED
At the second overflow dance held
last evening at the Packard academy
under the auspices of the Student
Council, the full number, 60 couples,'
attended, many being turned away.'
Dr. William D. Moriarty and Mrs.
Moriarty acted as chaperones. Robert
Bridge, '16, chairman, H..G. Alcox,..'17r
and W. L. Rindge, '16A, composed the
committee in charge of the affair.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Partly cloudy and colder, with
moderate shifting winds, becoming
northwest.
TOD)AY
10:30 o'clock-Rev. E. F. Chauncey
speaks, Episcopal church.
2:30 o'clock -Cosmopolitan club

BORDER DISTURBERS CIRCULATE
IEPORT'S THAT U. S. ACTION
ME ANS INTERVENTION
SITUATION IS VERY DELICATE
Vague Repots States That Bandit Ias
leached Los Crazes; (Garcia Thinks
Outlaws Disbanded
BULLLE TIN
Galveston, Texas, March IS.-
Marneo, 6 miles west of Torrean,
Massed uder the command of
Vila after he had utterly routed
the Carranza army. The battle,
which has been raging for several
hours, ended today when the Car-
ranza forces nubering several
hundred, were completely routed
Washington, Mar. 18.-Every effort
is being made by the administration to
b-ing to a speedy conclusion the march
into Mexico after Villa. Orders have
been sent to Brigadier-General .Per-
suing to lose no time in running the
bandits down.
Reports of a disturbing character
received from the border have con-
vinced officials that the longer Vhe
American forces are in Mexico the
graver is the danger of serious trouble
with the entire Mexican nation.
Misconstrue Aims of Expedition
From authoritative sources, the in-
formation is obtained that he situa-
tion is more delicate than it has been
at any previous time since thee troops
crosseAli he border. Anti-Carranba
disturbers along the border delibe:r-
ately misconstrue' the pirposes of the
expedition and circulate reports
throughout northern Mexico to the df-
fectthat the action taken by tie-Unit-
ed States is the forewarningof Intdr-
vention.
Steps are being taken by these agi-
tators to make it appear that Carranza
himself is aiding in the expedition, to
nake it appear that he is being md
the tool of the American government.
How long he will be able in face of
these reports to hold his forces in
line is a question which grows more
serious daily..
Government Reassures Mexicans
Strenuous efforts are being made
by the state departnment to counteract
these reports. It was at the sugges-
tion of the department that the Presi-
ident yesterday had Senator Lafollette
introduce in the senate a resolution
assuring the Mexican people on behalf
of Congress that under no circum-
stances does the American government
contemplate intervention or interfer-
ence with the internal forces of
Mexico.
Distribute Copies of Bill
Since this resolution has been acted
upon by the House, copies of it will
be sent throughout America as well
as in Mexico for distribution, just as
was done'in the correspond.ence which
passed between the two governments
in connection with the reciprocal
agreem ?nt for the suppression of bor-
der raids. When action was taken on
this measure in the House today, the
administration stated that it would
probably come up for consideration
early next week.
It has been reported that General
Gavira, commander of the Carranza:
forces around Juarez, had informa-
that General Pershing's forces would
not be permitted to keep Casas Gran-
des or other towns.
The administration appears extreme-
ly anxious that every possible avenue
of publicity should be used in the Unit-
ed States as well as in Mexico to cir-
culate the true purpose of the expe-
dition. Owing to the fact that a big

(Continued on Page Six)

of Law School Names Seniors
Membership in National
Law honor Society

Pick Eleven for
Order of the Coit

WA DEPARTMENT TELLS PERSHING
JO HASTEN VILLA PURSUIT: FEAR
ANTI-CARAZISASMAY REVOLT

Villistas Being Recruited meets, Unitarian church parlors.
Active propaganda is being carried 4:15 o'clock-Glee club rehearsal,
on by Villa agents, according to Mexi- S hool'of Music.
canok-re informers, among the peons and 7:3W 'lc-Fe B. Smith speaks,
can nfomers amng he ponsandUnion services, Hill auditorium.
poorer classes. It is reported that a Un 0o 'cser kRev E. F.d Caun e
sort of "Holy War" is being attempted o'clok-Rev. E. F. Chauncey
speaks. Episcopal church,
among the native Indian races of west-
ern Mexican for a general rising T
against the "gringoes.""
In the Mexican quarters at Phoenix, 7:30 o'clock-Michigan Dames hold:
Arizona, it is reported that 1,000 Mexi- indoor picnic, Newberry hall.
cans met secretly to condemn the "in- 8:30 o'clock-Cercle Francais meets,
vasion" of Mexico by the United , Cercle Francais rooms, south wing.
States.
American Mormons Safe U-NOTICE
There will be a meeting of all en-
With the arrival of Seventh cavalry gineers taking the spring trip, to dis-
and other soldiers who have swept cuss the schedule and final arrange-
down into Mexico, relief has come to ments, in room 273, Engineering build-
the beleaguered American Mormon ing, at 5:00 o'clock, Monday afternoon.
(Continued on Page Six) March 20.

was in November 1914 when he spoke author under the nom de plume of
to the 2000 delegates of the state boys Frank Danby, died on Friday at her
conference of that year. London home.
IhA

Rev. E. R. Rice.
of Detroit, will speak at the
First Methodist Church
State and Washington Streets
Services at 10:30

Congregational Church.
Mr. Douglas begins a series of sermon-lectures
this morning on "The Problem of Life-work."
Topic today, "THE CALL."

____i_ l

I

I-Saye

ThursdayE
For The Spring, ,oncert
Glee And Mandolin Club

iening

a

i

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