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March 17, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-17

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THE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

f-A
AN=,

M

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
'I eLEGRAPIl SERVICE BY THI
NEW YORK SUN

~===-- ~ -- - -

VOL. XXVI. No. 115.

PRIC FIVE CENTS

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FIDAY, MANC'H 17, 1916.

.. _

_,I

PERA ON SECOND
NIGHT SURPASSES
OPENING SUCCESS
WHOLE C AST POSSESSES MORE
FINISIED APPEAR-
:lNA' E
SONGS ARE HITS OF EVENING
"Men of the Maize and Blue" and "Out
in Lly Old Town Canoe" _Best
Received Numbers
Before a packed house, the second.
performance of "Tres Rouge," held
at the Whitney theatre last night, re-
ceived an ever-ready applause, and will
go down as one of the most finished
shows ever produced by the Mimes.
The co-operation of cast, chorus, and
orchestra was largely responsible for
the success of last night's perform-
ance.
Although the initial show was mark-
ed by a lack of orchestra co-operation,
the work of the musicians last night
was greatly improved, and together
with unusual acting and chorus work.
allowed little opportunity for criticism.
Walter Atlas, as Hezekiah Gregg, the
hen-pecked husband, played his dif-
ficult role in a natural manner, and
has undoubtedly proven himself to be
the "find" of this year's production.
His ability to change his deposition
from that of fear for his wife to pom-
posity and courage for his friends,
brought out a continuous round of ap-
plause from the appreciative audience.
Songs Are Big hits of Show
To mark off distinctly the relative
merit of the cast members would be
a difficult task. Carlson in his foot-
ball: song, "Men of the Maize and
Blue," supplied the pep and vim of a
typical football crowd, and was forced
to give repeated encores. This song,
the biggest hit of the show, is almost
certain to be one of the most popu-
lar songs of Michigan students.
Alongside of "Men of the Maize and
Blue" was "Out in My Old Town Can-
oe," sung by Grover and the chorus.
The swing and catchy Mfusic of this
song added life to the show, and the
unique entrance of Grover, seated in
the canoe, which was held on the
shoulders of several chorus men, gives
the entire/ scene unusual attractive-
ness. Grover, as "Auburnia," gives a
clever female impersonation,. His
dancing and singing ability make him
as good a leading lady as the Mimes
has ever produced.
Morrison Wood takes his role with
his accustomed easiness, and succeeds
in putting over a clever dance with
Grover. Wood's general appearance
marks him as a natural actor, and
with these qualifications he is en-
abled to lend a more than amateurish
air to the performance.
Sikes Plays Part in Good Manner
Chase B. Sikes, playing the part
of Brezanio, the temperamental ppet,
has the necessary vocal talent for
his part, and with Grover makes the
song, "Love Is a Rainbow" one of the
most pleasing of the production. Sikes'
acting has improved considerably, and
rlhe handles his poetical lines with the
required amount of sentimlit.
In addition to this the work of Kas-
berger, the butler, Hawkes, as Billy
Swift, Grant Cook, as Mrs. Hezekiah
Gregg, and the two red-headed girls.
Pardee and Palma, and Cunningham as

Spiffins, is 'worthy of considerable
praise. The working together of the
entire cast throughout the whole show
marks it as possessing a well-balanced
membership.
Morgan Leaves for Philadelphia
Director Morgan left Ann Arbor late
last night for Philadelphia, after hav-
ing watched the second performance.
On leaving he stated his utmost sat-
isfaction with the outcome of the
show, and again referred the success
(Continued on Page Six)

F-- _ _ _

German Attempts FUNSTON ORDERED TO CAPTURE VILLA DED OR AllVE
on VerdunF iT BER TOTutilCgP WITH ERRAN7AI SLDIERS
C H 9 Z 1 eli AeForced lo Ret-reat I ODEB 1H TO AVERT BR1EAK IIfHIt Scae'Fotodlnwhr
to" French Liiw lDEIE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN MEXICO PERMANENTI

Paris, Mar. 16.-In the Verdun sec-
tor, the Germans repeated this ater-
noon their attempt to gain possession
of the height of Le Mort Homme to
the west of the Meuse in which they
were defeated on Tuesday.I
Today's effort achieved even less
success than that which preceded it;
yesterday, and the Germans, failing
to secure a foothold anywhere in the

FRANK W. GROVER

as "Auburnia," Leading
"Tres Rouge."

Character hil

Ns Y, ORCHESTRA PLAYS
IN AUDITORIUM TOIHT,

With Albert Lindquest

Soloist

Organization Will Present In-
teresting Program'
A program of unusual interest will
be presented tonight in Hill auditor-
ium at 8:00 o'clock, when the New
York Philharmonic orchestra, with Al-
bert Lindquest as tenor soloist, will
make its first appearance in Ann Ar-
bor. The entireprogram consists of
compositions by well known masters,
all of whom are comparatively mod-
ern.
This , spiendid orchestra, which
ranks as o. of the i;remost organiza-
tions of its kind in the world, is main-
taining, under the able guidance of
its conductor, Josef Stransky, the same
high degree of excellence which has
characterized its work in the past,'
and each successive season is marked
by an increased number of concerts
given, and an extension of the terri-
tory covered.
Mr. Albert Lindquest, the tenor so-
loist upon this occasion, needs no in-
troduction to Ann Arbor audiences, as
he has already appeared here several
times and upon each occasion was
very well received.
The complete program for tonight
is as follows:
1. Overture, "Leonore No. 3"......
Beethoven
2. Aria, "Il mio tesore intante,"...
from "Don Giovanni".....Mozart
Mr. Lindquest
3. Symphoic Poem, "Les Preludes"
Liszt
4. Aria, "Celesta Aida," from "Aida"
" Verdi
Mr, Lindquest
5. Symphony No. 5, in -E Minor, Op.
64 .................Tchaikowsky
Sphinx- Triangles
HoldOpera Part

French lines, were forced to fail back
to the Bois des Corbeaux. No sooner
had they begun their retreat when
the French artillery opened a concen-
trated fire upon them, causing serious
losses in their ranks.
This was the only offensive attempt-
ed by the Germans in this sector to-
day, although on the right bank of the
river the artillery of both sides great-
ly increased its activity in the regions
of Douaumont and Vaux. German
troops in movements in this region
were brought under French fire on
several occasions, and it is inferred
that these troops may have been in-
tended for some infantry action which
was blocked by the effectiveness of
the French guns.
The artillery of both sides contin-
ued the cannonading on the slope be-
tween the Woevre and the heights of
the Meuse.
The French bomlardment of German
positions in the region of Nieuport,
Belgium, yesterday, resulted in com-
pletely destroying the German com-
municating trenches about LaPlage
with a number of casualties, accord-
ing to reports of French patrols.
TWO'PASSNGERSHIPS f
TTAC D, IS REPORT
T1 ubantia and Patria Thought to 3el
Victim Vessels; May Reopen
Submarine Issuel
Washington, Mar. 16.-Unofficial re-
ports of the sinking of the- Dutch pas-l
senger ship Tubantia and the attempt-
ed torpedoing of the French passen-
ger ship Patria reached the State de-
partment this afternoon.
The department is suspending judg-
ment until it has the facts, but in-
vestigation by the United States gov-
ernment is certain. The submarine
issue of the central powers may again,
become acute as a result.-1
* Facts which appear as already es-
tablished are that both vessels were
unarmed passenger ships. Both hact
American passengers on board, and in
both cases the lives of these Americans1
were jeopardized. Reports conflict as
to whether the Tubantia was torpe-l
doed or struck a mine.
nI the case of the Patria there seems
to be no divergence of opinion relativel
to the attemptof the submarine to
send this ship to the bottom, If state-
ments attributed to passengers are re-
liable. For this reason the Patria
case may have an important bearing
on the submarine issue.

lBi'TWEEN U. S, AND SOCT'lH-
16 COUNT'RY
OBREGON MESSAGE FRIENDLY
Qhdel lRepcrted Along Border; Troops
C4'on front I by S-arcit y of
Drinking Water
BZT TETl N,
,er geles, 5.16.--Accor'.
ing to iord evreceived here tonight,
*a 1 1') u ut ,ino ns ('arranza follow.
rs irye concentratig at Cabu-
lena, I miles south of Douglas,
Ar izon. P'ha s are being worked
out 1,13. #;I ited tatesarmy.of-
licers to ixoie against this force
if ievelopmaent iieaessitates such
auction.
DENY AMERICANS PERMANENT STAY

MEXICAN SITUATION SUMMARY
U. C. ,0VERNMENT WISHES CAR.
ItANZISTAS TO GET ('REDIT FOR
CAP1TURE 01" VOTILLA NDN HIS
AMERICA*N EXPEDITION tN DEJ
GENERAL PEI}SJIING ENTERS
3EXICO BUIT IS HELD UP
THROUGH DIPLOMATIC INTRI-
CA CIES A ND SCARCITY OF
DRINKIN0 WATER FOR THE
TROOPS.
CARItANZA GENERALS CO-OPER.
ATING WITH AMERICAN FORCES
NOW IN MEXICO BUT ATTITUDE
OF TiOOPS UNCERTAIN.
TO ADDRESS MENORAH SOCIETY
Visconsin Professor Will Speak To-
morrow Night ii Newberry Hall
Prof. Horace M. Kaller, of the phil-
osophy department of the University

SHOOT VILLA WHEN

Tale Steps to Guard Against Treach-
ery; Report Tells of
Snipers
BULLETIN
Washington, Mar.16.-Despatch-
es to the State department today
stated that Anericaijs were de-
parting in large numbers from
Mexica City and towns in the
State of Sonora, either for the
Uiitel States or for the lower
coast ports i Mexico where better
protection seems assured.

"CAPTURE VILLA DEAD OR

1A ND11TCAlTURED BY

TO s
CAR-

El Paso, [lar. 16.-Orders were re-
ceived today by the military author-
ities in Juarez, according to a state-
nent by General Gavira, that, while a
recip rocal arrangement existed where-
by the American troops were given a
right of way into Mexico on their puni-
tive exp,,dition, no contemplation of
the permianent presence of troops will
be sanctioned in any of the villages or
towns in Me"ico. General Gavira also
stated that he had sent a notice to the
commanders of the garrisons at Ma-
era, Ca sas G rands, and Pearson, no-
ifying them of the reciprocal agree-
ment between the two governments
and iutiructing thcm to notify the peo-
ple of their respective communities so
that the passage of the American
troops would not be misunderstood.
"This,' said General Gavira, " has
been done and the people in northern
Chihuahua know of the pursuit of Vil-
la. The situation is a very delicate
one and we took this step as a pre-
caution. I wish also to state that
while we arc carrying tut to the let-
ter the instructions of the first chief,
the situation is one that is misunder-
stood by many American people. 'That
we carry out our orders is but right
and proper, but we still feel that the
Villa problem is ours and that we
Mexicans can solve it."
Ob se=on Friendly in Message
That the Carranza government is
showing good faith in its agreement
with the American forces was evidentI
today by the receipt of the following
message from General Obregon, Mexi-
can Secretary of War, to all Mexican
border garrisons and p.resumably iL
all Mexican garrisons where Carranza
troops are in control:
"A treaty having been negotiated
between our government and the Unit-
ed States in order that the troops of
ou- respective governments may cross
the international line to pursue ban-
dits who ar committing depredations
along our frontier, I hereby advise all
:meials and order them in every in-
stance to place themselves in co-oper-
ation with the military authorities of
4 'outin ed on iPage Six)
T T IV

'I

1
1
t
i
i
I
;
it

of wisconsin, will awiress the Mieno[-
ah society tomorrow night in New- Washington, Mar. 16.-The Carranza
berry hall. The meeting will take the forces in Mexico are to have the cr'edit
place of the regular Sunday one and of capturing Villa dead or alive if
will start at 8:00 o'clock. the bandit is captured at all.
Professor Kaller addressed the Me- Instructions to this effect are be-
norah society several years ago and lieved to have been sent to General
gave one of the most entertaining Ic- Funston, who is directing the movey
tures that the society has heard. ment of the American punitive expedi-
----__tion under the direct charge of General
6ABGOYLE ON SALE AT NOO Pershing. In this way, it is said, the
NOO-AAmerican government hopes to bridge
over the delicate situation existing be-
TllI'Mor Publication's Leap Year Issue tween the administration in Washing-
Appeajrs Today ton and the Carranza government,
- -- growing out of the decision to send
"Leap year is the last hope of the troops into Mexico.
graceless," says the Leap Year num- An announcement was recently made
ber of the Gargoyle, which goes on at the White House following the raid
sale at noon today, and the rest of on Columbus by Villa and his band,
the publication is taken up with prov- that an adequate force would be sent
ing the why and wherefore of the into Mexico .to capture the outlaw
statement. An editorial on the rela- chief and his men, but high officials
tion of the women and the men of the of the government were the authority
university is well worth the reading for the statement that the President
by both sexes. The writer does not would much prefer to have the actual
spare tke faults of either, but seeks arrest made by the Carranza troops ac-
to show themin theirs true light. companying the Pershing expedition.
President aid to Favor Action
It is said the President would be
I~ jj wii K f' GOI ON much gratified if the Carranza forces
W/ lATJ S G INGV1. would bag the bandit before the Am-
erican forces get within striking di's-
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin- tance of him.
ity--Unsettled, with variable winds. Whether this hope was in any way
TODAY responsible for the delay in getting
11:36 o'clock - Sphinx-Triangle the American expedition started is
dance, Michigan Union. doubtful, but it was pointed out to-
12:1a o'clock-Law faculty lunch- night that the Carranza forces oper-
eon, Union. ating from the south were able to get
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, Al- a week's start on the trail ahead of
pha Nu rooms, U-Hall. the American forces.

i
1'
x
1

Annual Aiffir Will Be Followed
Dinner and Dance at the
Michigan Union

7:00 o'clock -Intercollegiate So-
cialist society meets, Newberry hall.
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, U-
hall.
7:34 o'clock - Jeffersonian society'
meets, Law building.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,l
Law building.
8:00 o'clock-New York Philharmon-
ic Orchestra, Hill auditorium.
8:1i o'clock-"Tres Rouge," Whit-
ney theatre.
TOilORRO W
2:15 o'clock-"Tres Rouge" matinee,
Whitney theatre.
8:13 o'clock-"Tres Rouge," Whit-
ney theatre.
9:00 o'elock-Michigan Union dance,
Union.

by

Sphinx and Triangle societies will
hold their traditional post-opera sup-
per and dance at the Union tonight. A'
block of seats has been reserved ate
the Whitney theatre by the two junior
honorary societies, and after the
opera performance the supper and
dance will begin at the Union.
The post-opera dance has been held
for the last eight years, and festivities
usually continue till early in the morn-
ing, but owing to the recent ruling
of the faculty in regard to late danc-
ing, this will probably be the last
time that the wee, sma' hours will
be reached.

Even if the actual capture should
be made' by Pershing's men, officials
expressed the opinion tonight that the
bandit would be turned over to the
Carranza authorities. In substantia-
tion of these assertions it was pointed
out that as far as the Washington gov-
ernment is officially informed Villa
has not been indicted for any of the
murders committed at Columbus, nor
is he, as far as is known here, under
indictment for any crime committed
in the United States.
Would Relieve V. S. of Responsibility
Villa is expected to be shot summar-
ily if he is caught alive and turned
over to the Mexican authorities. In
this way the United States would be
relieved of direct responsibility for
his fate, and it is also pointed out
that such an outcome of the pursuit
would tend to re-establish Carranza in
the eyes of his own people.
President Wilson 'is said to have
been much pleased over yesterday's
reports from General Funston that tie
Pershing expedition met with no oppo-
sition when it crossed the line, and
that the Carranza forces would join
((ontinued on [age Six)

HEAR S

A x ' X1

I IN

.

""War Song" from "'Cross of Fire"

U-OTICE
All students, including freshmen,
interested in trying out for the busi-
ness staff of the.Gargoyle, should re-
port at the Gargoyle office in the Ann
Arbor Press building today between
the hours of 1:00 and 3:00 o'clock.
The attendance committee hereafter
will meet men students on Mondays
from 3:00 to 4:00 o'clock and on
Thursdays from 11:00 to 12:00 o'clock.

Thursday, March 23
Glee and Mandolin Club Concert

- 8:00 P. M.
Hill Auditorium

-I

1'i ,' I

1500

COPIcE

YF OR THE
YOUR COPY WILL BE READY AT NOON
LEAP YEAR ISSUE

CAMP

15c

.. t

11

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