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March 16, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-16

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THE I)AILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND1
THE CAMPUS

GAN
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,, THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1916.

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXVI. No. 114.

"TRES ROUGE"
PLEASES FIRST
NIGHT AUIENCE
INDIVIDUAL ACTING ATONES FOR
SLIGHT'ITCHES IN
UNION OPERA
ATAS MAKES HIT OF PLAY
Rich Costumes and Excellent Scenic
Effects Add to Charm of
Production
To those genial croakers whose chief
aim in life it is to lament the raw-
ness of first night productions of Michi-
gan Union operas, the initial bow of
"Tres Rouge, A Musical Comedie,"
came as something of a surprise. Not
that the rawness was not there-it was
-but it was tempered by consistent
good acting on the part of certain mem-
bers of the cast, and smoothed over
in some measure by the volume and
swing with which the performance
moved along.
On the whole-and this is the con-
sensus of opiion of a large number
of those present-"Tres Rouge," as
presented last evening, was a satisfac-
tory performance, a performance in
which there was a plentiful admixture
of good and bad, with the good notice-
ably in the ascendancy.
First N mghters Critical
The troupe was unable to get away
from that nervousness, that inherent
timidity, that accompanies all first
night productions. It was in the air
back of the stage, and it manifested
itself among the spectators by a sharp
intaking of breath in the tight places.
Like all "first nighters," they were
looking for "something to happen,"
but when the critical moment was
passed in safety and nothing had hap-
pened, they were vociferous in their
applause.
Indeed, not a little confusion was
wrought by the demands of the audi-
ence for more encores than the com-
pany had rehearsed. The major troubles
of the chorus were undoubtedly ,due
to the iiefliciency of the orchestra. It
seemed impossible for the two ends of
the orchestra pit to keep together.
Costumes 'ive Finished Appearance
The costumes were unusually bril-
liant, and the scenery and general
stage effects far above average.
The feature of the show was the
splendid acting of Walter R. Atlas, '18,
as "llezekiah Gregg." The part was
admirably fitted to the player, and his
presentation of it drew round after
round of applause. Witty lines and
(Continued on Pag'e Six)
PLAN STUDENTOFFICER
CORPS FOR UNIVERSITY
Important Members of National Guard
M1ay Speak at Open Meeting
in Near Future
With the approval of 4egent H. C.
Dulkley of Detroit, and the support of
Dean Al.. f. Cooley, of the engineering
college. Mr. C. l Wilson, instructor
in mechanical engineering, is carry-
ing forward plans which may result
in an elective student officer corps
which will go through a course of
training under the direction of Mr.
Wilson during the rest of the year'
and may go to summer camp under

his personal guidance.
Many students who have had pre-
vious military experience have shown
much interest in this proposed mea-
sure, which was first suggested to Re-
gent l1ulkleg by Mr. Wilson.
Requests have also been sent to the
Chief of Ordnance to ask for the do-
nation of rifles for this undertaking,
while the Quartermaster General has
been interrogated concerning the pos-
sibility of securing uniforms.

Found Phi Alpha
Tau Branch Here
Xi hapter of N ationat Honorary
Speecli Arts Fraternity Added to
Dist Yesterday
A new honor society was yesterday
added to the list now at Michigan when
the Xi chapter of Phi Alpha Tau, na-
tional honorary speech arts fraternity
was organized here.
Charter members of this chapter are:
L. H. Dunten, '16L, H. H. Springstun,
'17, C. E. Fordney, '15E, J. F. Jordan,
'16, M. C. Wood, '17, F. W. Grover, '18,
W. M. Brucker, '16L, M. C. Carlton,
'16L, O. J. Watts, '18, W. Peddicord,
'16L, E. A. Sachs, '17, F. H. Atlee, '18E,
C. W. Miller, '19, F. Mv. Adams, '17,
H. H. Irwin, '17L, H. L. Davis, '17, and
H. E. Carlson, '17.
Phi Alpha Tau was founded at the
Emerson College of Oratory in 1902.
There are now eleven chapters. The
purpose of the fraternity is to create
and foster niterest in all of the speech
arts, including oratory, dramatics and
music. It has received full faculty
sanction and approval.
Spaniards Ready
to Fight Entente
( onsul Says Feeling Is Strong for In-
tervention on Side of
!Germany1

Hold Women 9S
Luncheon April 1
WiN Be Followed by Second Produc-
tion of Junior Girls'
IN 1H UN BIT TLE Pa
Plans for the eighth Annual Women's
TAKE OFFENSIVE AGAINST GER- Luncheon, to be held April 1, have
MANS AND RETAKE TRENCHES been almost completed by the com-
ON WEST BANK OF IWEIUSE niittee. The Women's Luncheon, which
two years ago took the place of the
annual banquet, is a function in which
BRITISH RECAPTURE SOLLUM all Michigan women may participate,
and is followed by the second prpduc-
tion of the Junior Girls' play. A large
(xerman Nau y Report Says Submarine number of alumnae always return, and
Did not Sink Sius; Austria tils year a prominent Michigan roman,
Declares War on Portugal Helen Bacon, '92, president of the New
York Michigan Women's association,
Paris, Mar. 15.-The offensive in will be toastmistress.
the battle for Verdun appears from Ruth Hutzel, '16, chairman of the
the official statement issued today to luncheon committee, has announced
have passed "into the hands of the the following committees: Decoration,
French. Olive Wiggins, '19; toasts and enter-
Counter attacks made last night tainment, Martha Gray, '16; menu, Mrs.
against the positions taken by the R. Effinger, Dean Jordan, Miss Hunt,
Germans yesterday on the Bethin- Margaret Henderson, '18; tables, Lyn-
court-Cumieres front recovered cer- da Eberbach, '18; tickets, Margaret
tain of these trenches. The height of Risedorf, '17; invitations, Hilda Die-
Le Mort Homme did not change hands terle, '17; waiters, Emily Loman, '19.
but is still in possession of the-
Wrench.
It is in the region to the east of theT
Meuse that the French seem to be
taking the offensive. Violent activ-
ity is reported from the Vaux-Bam-
loup front where French skirmish I
parties armed with hand grenades Prof. Bridgman Secured for Local Ad-.
forced the fighting on the slope to dress Topic, "High
the east of the Vaux front. Pressures"
While the French were recovering '
part of the lost positions on the west Prof. P. W. Bridgman, one of the
bank of the river and assuming the most prominent members of the Harv-
lead in the fighting on the east bank ard University faculty, and one of the
the Germans made no infantry attack nation's foremost physicists, has been .
and even the artillery bombardment secured by the university officials to
which had been of great violence on lecture here on March 20. The sub-
the Bethincourt-Cumieres front de- Ject upon which Professor Bridgman
creased appreciably in intensity. will speak will be' "The Physicall
No attempt has been made by the Properties of Materials Under Highl
Germans to make further progress hsinesB
to the west of the river since yester- In his investigations, Professor Bridg-
day and this assault, which was pre- man has found that certain chemicalc
ceded by so great artillery prepara- and physical reactions occur at high
tions, now appears to be over. pressures which would not even be
n suspected at ordinary temperatures.-
Austria 1)eclares War on Portugal
London, Mar. 15.-Austria has de- PHYSICS MEN HOLD MEETIN i
clared war on Portugal, according to
a dispatch to the Exchange Telegraph Faculty 'Discusses Problems With 40
company from Rome State Teachers Present

U, S. SOLDIERS ENTER MEXICO;
CARRANIA TROOPS TO CO-OPERATE
I WITH AMERIGhNS IN BADTHN

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J:
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*

S * * *

Tihurston, '18E, Critically Ill
Norman T. Thurston, '18E, lies
in the University hospital in a
critical condition due to an at-
tack of pneumonia. His parents
have come from Toledo because
of the severity of his illness.

$:
*:
a;
*1

COMM UNICATION LINES ESTAB-
il 1E D AS CONCERTED AC-
TION BEGINS
CAVALRY LEADS IN INVASION
Bell Ringing in Querataro Celebrates
Friendly Relations Between
Two Nations
BULLE TIN
Washington, Mar. 1.--The sen-
ate today approved unanimously
flnith frali1in '4A i~AI. h

New York, Mar. 15.-Percival Gaffett,
for four years American consul at
Malaga, Spain, brought disquieting re-
ports of conditions .in Spain when he
arrived today on the liner Manuel
Caldo from Cadiz and Barcelona.
"The war spirit has finally struck
Spain," he said. "On every side one
hears demands for intervention on the
side of Germany. Germany is regard-
ed as Spain's friend partly because the
Teutons are fighting Spain's hereditary
enemy, but mostly because it is under-
stood in diplomatic circles that the
Kaiser has made certain promises to
King Alphonso through the Pope.
"The feeling against Americans is
strong."
Seek Endorsement
forPace League

BAKER ANNOUNCES THAT
SOLDIERS HAVE CROSSED
Co-operation of Troops of De Facto
(overument and U. S.
Apparent
Washington, Mar. 15. -- At 1:0C(
o'clock tonight Secretary of War Baker
officially announced that the American
expedition in pursuit of Francisco
Villa, the Mexican bandit .chief, had
crossed the border. Previous to the
announcement the Secretary e calied to
the White House ana laid before
President Wilson an official dispatch
from General Funston.
Returning to the War department he
issued this statement:
"The department received tonight in
code a message from General Funston
which announced that American troops,
crossed the border into Mexico today
but does not give the hour of crossing.
I am very happy to say that the dis-
patch shows that the military repre-
sentatives of the de facto government
of Mexico not only interposed no ob-
stacles but appear to be co-operating."
Press dispatches from the border
today stated that Villa had burned a
Mormon church at Colonial Dublin last
night and that Mormons in the vicin-
ity were fleeing to Casas Grandes.
WHAT'S GOING .ON

I

Ask

National Political Conventions
for Planks Approving
Plans

New York, Mar. 15.-A movement to
have each of the national conventions
in St. Louis and Chicago insert planks
in their platforms endorsing the plan
of the League to Enforce Peace, of
which former President Taft is the
head, was announced today by Charles
Steward Davidson, vice-chairman of
the committee on home organization, of
which Judge Alden B. Parker is the
chairman. The purpose of the league
is that the joint armed forces of all
the great powers be used to try arbi-
trational or conciliatory methods be-
fore going to war.
BANK FELLOWSHIP FOR JUNIORS.
Altered Plans of Nei York Concern
Include Third Year Men
Juniors will also be eligible for the
business fellowships being planned by
the National City bank of New York
City, according to notice just received
by Professor Geo. W. Dowrie, of the
economics department.
In the first set of plans drawn up
by the bank and various universities,
only sophomores and seniors were to
be considered by the faculty in choos-
ing the men to derive the advantages
of this practical form of business edu-
cation. Now that the selection is to
be made from such a large number of
students in the economics departmnent,
interest will probably increase mate-
rially among those who wish to obtain
the advantages of these fellowships.

British Forces Reoccupy Egyptian Post
London, Mar. 15.-The Secretary of
War tonight issued the following an-
nouncement:
"The force under Major-General
Peyton yesterday reoccupied Sollum,
the Egyptian frontier post on the
Mediterranean near the Tripoli fron-
tier which was evacuated by the Brit-
ish last December. The retreating
enemy was successfully pursued by,
armed motor cars, cavalry, and camel
corps."
Germans Deny Submarine Sank Silius
Berlin. via Wireless, Mar. 15.-An
official investigation by the German
navy has established the fact that no
German submarine was concerned in
the sinking of the Norwegian bark
Sims, says the Over Seas news ag-
ency.
Panama Canal to Be Open on April 15
Washington, Mar. 15. -An official
prediction that the Panama canal will
be reopened by April 15 for the pas-
sage of deep draught vessels was an-f
nounced tonight by the War depart-
ment.

The department of physics has made
what promises to be a successful inno-
vation by instituting a series of occa-
sional Saturday meetings, at which
the members of the department are
met by teachers in the various schools
and colleges in the state.
The first of these was held March 11,'
with an attendance of about 40. The
subject discussed at this meeting was
'Recent Theories of Atomic Structure."
Professors H. M. Randall, A. W. Smith,
W. F. Colby, and Mr. G. G. Wright pre-
sented various phases of the subject.
FRED. SMITH TO TALK SUNDAY
New Yorker Seeured for "Y" Meeting
in Auditorium
Fred B. Smith, of New York City,
will speak in Hill auditorium at 7:30
o'clock Sunday evening, under the aus-
pices of the University Y. M. C. A. The
subject of his address will be announc-
ed later in the week.
Mr. Smith is connected with the
Johns-Manville company, and has a
reputation in the East of being an in-
teresting and convincing speaker.

Weather
ity-old,
winds.

for Ann Arbor and vicin-
with moderate northuwest

te joint resolution aopted ay te
house yesterday to bring the mo-
bile army up to its full strength,
which would add about 20,000 men
to the present establishment. The
resolution now goes to the Pres-
de'ut -for his approval.
El Paso, Tex., Mar. 15.-United
States troops passed the border into
Mexico this, afternoon -shortly after
12 o'clock.
Confirmation of the movement came
from several points. Messengers ar-
riving from the border sent the news
from Deming, New Mexico; later con-
firmation came from Columbus. It
was also confirmed at Fort Bliss, re-
cent headquarters of General Persh-
ing, and at Fort Sam Houston, the
headquarters of general Funston. Gen-
eral Pershing is in command of the
expedition.
CARRANZA TROOPS COOPERATE
Advices received tonight stated that
the command of Carranza troops un-
der General Pablo Bertani joined tke
American forces and would co-operate
with them. It is now known that there
was no resistance from the Mexican
forces when the crossing was affect-
ed and it is also known that General
Pershing has held conferences with
General Bertani since reaching Co-
lumbus, Monday night.
Military men say that it is certain
Carranza forces had agreed in ad-
vance to offer no resistance if they did
not actually join the Americans, as the
small invading American force was in-
sufficient to have forced its way over
the line, General Pershing having
started before all the forces en route
to the border had -reached him at Co-.
lumbus. His aeroplanes were not com-
pletely set up when the American ex-
pedition left Columbus this afternoon.
This information was brought here by
passengers who arrived on trains from
Columbus.
Further credence is given to the be-
lief that the American and Carranza
forces are operating jointly by the de-
training here this afternoon of the .
11th Cavalry from Fort Oglethorpe,
Georgia. It was under orders org-
inaly to go on to Columbus.
CAVALRY TO HUNT DOWN VILLA
The advance guard of the American
invading army is to establish lines of
communication, it is stated. The ad-
ditional cavalry, which is to make up
the expedition that will do the princi-
pal work of hunting down Villa, will
follow as it arrives at Columbus and
its supply trains are fitted out.
Automobile trucks to carry goods
and forage for the expedition are now
en route here from Wisconsin. The
first shipment re'ached here today.
These will be necessary before the en-
tire expedition can get under way. The
troops leaving today travelled with
their old mule wagons. They will
break the trail and establish a road
so that when the additional cavalry ar-
rives and enters, and when the avia-
tion squadron is set up and the motor
transports reach the border they will
lose no time in following.
The 13th Cavalry and Companies E,
F, and G or the engineer corps led the
entry into Mexico today, followed by
the 6th and 16th Infantry regiments,
(Continued on Page Six)

TODAY
2:00 to 4:00 ozclock-Pageant try-
outs, Prof. Kenyon's office, old Eng.
Building.
4:00 o'clock-Senior lit meeting,
Tappan hall.
4:00 o'clock-Y. M. C. A. nominating
committees meet, "Y" building.
4:15 o'clock--Faculty concert,. Hill
auditorium.
7:00 o'clock--Dr. Winter speaks on
"Roman Cities," Memorial hall.
8:15 o'clock-" Tres Rouge," Whitney
theatre.
Architect exhibit in Alumni Memor-
ial hall.
TOMORROW
12:15 o'clock-Law faculty lunch-
eon, Union.
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, U-
hall.
7:30 o'clock - Jeffersonian "society
meets, Law building.
7:30 o'clock--Webster society meets,
Law building.
8:00 o'clock-New York Philharmon-
ic Orchestra, Hill auditorium.
8:15 o'clock-"Tres Rouge," Whit-
ney theatre.
11:30 o'clock - Sphinx-Triangle
dance, Michigan Union.
U-NOTICE
The annual selection of class canes
and gowns will be made by the senior
lit class at a meeting at 4:00 o'clock
this afternoon in Tappan call.

Glee and Mandolin Club
SPRING CONCERT
* Thusday, March 25
Hear the Club for the
Last time this year

' Y

6

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
AUDITORIUM

ORCHESTRA
Soloist $1

Friday
March 17.

rice $1.00
.25, $1.50

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