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March 15, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-15

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I 1

THE DAILY
$1.00
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

op. "a.
tit
7
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GA

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Phones:--Editorial 2414
Business 960
T1ELEGHAP11 SERVICE BITV K
\E1 YORK SUN

VOL. XXVl. No. 113.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.

MORGAN DECLARES
READYFOHR DEBUT
FINAL TDRESS ]REHEARSAL IS
SUCCESS; OIRCLHESTRA iNI
GOOI) SLTAPE
PLAN PRIZE FOR ,1917 BOOK
4 ofjjm(' iThinks Reward Would
Serve as lnceintii e for Scenario
Writers in Future

Promise Prur
All Required Aid
(Geran'aii\ Declaration of War Brings
omise of Assistance fro
Allied Powers

_.
3

After the second complete dress re-
hearsal of "Tres Rouge" Director
Morgan declared the production as
ready for the initial performance at
8:00 o'clock tonight. The greater
part of the final rehearsal was de-
voted to a smoothing out of some of
the individual acting, dancing, and
the orchestra work. The songs of
the show are in good shape ,and to-
gether with a splendid array of cos-
tumes and scenery should make much
towards the success of the opera.
Much of the difficulty faced in re-
hearsals was the orchestra., which did
not get started on the music until
late last week. Considerable improve-
ment was shown with the musicians
last night, and with another rehearsal
today the management is practically)
certain that this part of the show will
be as good as that of previous years.
Those who witnessed the last dress
rehearsal last night commented upon
the music. costumes, and the scenery,
and it is expected that these three
features will contribute the most to
the 1916 production. Others who
have witnessed dress rehearsals of
previous operas expressed the opin-
ion that the rehearsal last night was
better than that of any other final
dress parade they had seen.
The Spanish costumes in the last
act give the show a professional and
luxurious atmosphere, wiil e thelight,
modern apparel worn in the first part
of the show gives a sense of modern-
ity. The two acts furnish a variety
of dress and color, while the lighting
(Continued on Page Six)
TAU BETA PI TAKES
IN 15 J-ENGINEERS

London, Mar. 14.-Sir Edward Grey.
secretary for foreign affairs, speaking
in the commons today, said that Ger-
many's declaration of war against
Portugal had made necessary the old
position regarding the payment of
compensation by Portugal for the
ships requisitioned by her.
Portugal, Sir :Edward Grey said,
has been assured that Great Britain
and her allies will offer all the as-
sistance Portgual requires.
New York Solons
Want 'em To Vote
State Legislature Favors Amendment
Submittim IWImaI's Suffri'nue
to Popuhir Vote
Albany, Mar. 14.-The state legis-
)ature today passed by a vote of 109
to 30 the constitutional amendment
proposing to give women the right to
vote. The senate judiciary commit-
tee is expected to report the amend-
ment, and the advocates of the cause
believe the senate will pass it. This
will mean that the suffrage question
will be submitted to the people agaIn
at the fall election of next year after
it passes the ne : legislature.
Gr-ad Says U. S.
Has Useless Guns'
R. W. Ileinrich, '16E, Now Lieutenant'
in Marines, Makes Startling State-
ments in 'T'alk Before Adelphi

FINAL GONCERT
OF MUSIC CLUBS
COMES MARgH H3
FEW MEMBERS AFFECTED BY ELI-
GIBILITY COMMITTEE; HAVE '
GOO) PROGRAM -
ANNOUNCE ITINERARY OF TRIP
Senate Council Approves Dates Taking,
1mUsici'ans to Western, Coast;
Alumni Plan Receptions
After long weeks of hard practice,
and with the added incentive of par-
ticipation in a two weeks' western trip
during the spring vacation, the com-
bined glee and mandolin clubs will
make their final bow to the campus
Thursday evening, March 23, at Hill
auditorium with an excellent' pro-
gram of songs and syncopated melo-
dies.
Contrary to the experience ,of form-
er years, the axe of'the eligibility com-
mittee found few victims among the
musicians; so that the clubs remain
intact as they have been since the
first rehearsal of the year. The add-
ed advantage of continual practice to-
gether uinder the able direction of
STheodore Harrison has made a star
of every man and complicated the
work of selecting the men for the an-
nual spring trip.
The Senate Council reviewed the
proposed itinerary of the trip Monday,
afternon, and approved all the plans
in connection with it. The members
will leave Tuesday afternoon, April 4,
for Chicago, and on arriving there
will leave at once over the Northern
Pacific route for Minneapolis, where
in conjunction with the Minnesota
club the first concert will be given
on the evening of April 5 on the state
university campus.
th er cities on the tour include
Great Falls, Montana, Friday evening,
April 7; Helena, Saturday evening,
April 8. and Spokane, Sunday evening,
April 10.
From Spokane the trip to Portland
will be made by boat down the Co-
lumbia river, and the concert in the
Rose City given on Tuesday evening,
April 12. Aberdeen, Washington, will
be entertained by the singers, Wednes-
day evening, April 13; Tacoma the
following night. and Seattle on Fri-
day. While in the latter city the clubs
will be the guests of the students and
faculty of the University of Washing-
ton.

Germans Report
Action at Verdun
Official Statements.Announces Capture
oil Two British and Two
French Aeroplanes
Berlin, via London, Mar. 14.-The
German official statement issued to-
day mentioned no action in the Ver-
dun region, and says that, generally
speaking, there was no change on the
western front. The official statement
is devoted to air exploits. It an-
nounces the bringing down of two
British and two French aeroplanes, the
latter northwest of Verdun. Lieuten-
ant Immelmann, who brought down a
British machine west of Arras, was
thereby credited with his first suc-
cessful attack on enemy aeroplanes.
ENGLISH BILL GALLS FOR
ENORMOUSASSESSMENT
Army Estimates Measure Provides for
Four Million Men at Daily
Cost of $15,000,o0o
London, Mar; 14.-Harold J. Pen-
nant, under-secretary of war, in-
troduced the army estimate bill in the
House of Commons today. The meas-
ure calls for an army of four million
men at an expense including munitions
of $15,000;000 daily. Mr. Pennant said
that it was not in the public interest
to give the numbers of the men now
serving in the army or training for it.
Ie paid a tribute to the wonderful
discipline of the man, considering their
short training period, and said that the
success in recruiting was an augury
of victory. At the outset of the war,
he said, men concealed their property
and feigned defects to prevent enlist-
ing.
The government and the minister
of munitions, he said, were con-
sidering the question of single men
entering the munitions factories to es-
cape military service. It was impossi-
ble, he said, to undertake that every
single man in the munitions far-
tories should - be taken before any
married men.
Mr. Pennant also announced in the
House of Commons today, that ar-
rangements are being made for the ex-
change of all British prisoners in the
hands of the Turks,

STRICTEST CENSORSHIP ESTABLISHED
ALONG MEXIAN DODE BY AMRICANS
CATTLEMAN HELD BY BANDITS fREEE[

TROUBLE BEGINS
FOR WA R

sORMEs

El Paso, March 14.-The ex-
pedition to pursue Francisco
Villa now has an official censor.
He is lieut. Martin L. Schallen-
berger, aide-de-camp, and his
first bulletin was:
"The concentration and mobil-
ization is now being arranged.
Brig. Gen. Pershing is engaged
in studying out the strategic
plans of movement."
'War" correspondents are al-
ready having their trouble w1.'h
the 'censorship." Lieut. Scha~l-
lenberger, they ,say, refuses to
do anything, to aid the corre -
pondents, who have to gather
their own equipment and even
transport their own horses to
concentration points.
TO GIVE[ LECTUREIS
Prof. Paul Van den Ven, of University
of Louvain, Will Speak During
Schoolmasters' Convention
DR. LOEW ALSO ON PROGRAM
Prof. Paul Van den Ven, of the Uni-

SOLDIERS PLACED ON GUARD
OVER TELEPIONE AND
TELEGRAI'llLINES
TAKE MAN THOUGHT TO BE SPY
Mexican Waiter Arrested in Columbus
May Rlave Assisted Villa;
Find Booty in Room
BULLETIN
Washington, Mar. 14. - Thil
resolution aithorizing the Presi-
dent to recruit the regular army
to full war strength was adopted
in the Ilouse by a vote of 236
!o I
SIGNAL CORPS PLACED IN CHARGE

Alumni and Associate Elections
Be Given Out at a
Later Date

Will

TN1'I.IATION BANQUET .MARCH 29
Fifteen students of the junior engi-
neering class are today wearing the
white and seal button which is the
token of their election to Tau Beta
Pi, national engineering honor frater-
nity.
Those who are honored by the elec-
tion are:t
Laurence W. Brunson.
Ralph H. Cady.
Lou R. Crandall.
Donald M. Drake.
Arthur E. Hecker.
Ernest K. Hill.
Harry R. Leach.
Arthur B. McGee.
Robert L. McNomee.
.Tohn W. Neumann.
Carleton W. Reade.
Gordon Smith.
Edmund A. Thomas.
Chester K. Reichert.
Harold B. Winchell.
Alumni and associate elections will
be given out at a later date after the
lists have been completed. The above
active members were selected from the
eighest eighth- of the junior class in
point of scholarship. Final selection
was then based upon their campus ac-
tivity. The initiation banquet will be
held at the Union on March 29.

In a talk before the Adelphi House
of Representatives last night, K. W.
Heinrich, 'lEE, a lieutenant in the U.
S. marines, stated that the United
States army at the present time had
only 634 machine guns.
All of this number are old timers,
he said, many dating from Civil War
times. A short time ago when the
Mexicans were raiding Columbus, 13
of the guns positively refused to go off
at all. Although it has been repoted
that 12,000 troops are now in Mexico
in reality there are only about 5,000
regulars and the remainder are militia
men from Texas, New Mexico and
California. Most of these are now
en route to the scene of battle
Lieutenant Heinrich is in direct
touch with official circles at Washing-
taon and so information from him is
considered accurate.
MEN NEEDED FOR PAGEANT
Poster Artists Must hand in Work to
Prof. Kenyon Before 4:00 Today
Tryouts for the Women's League
pageant to be held April 28 began yes-
terday and will continue for several
days, Professor Kenyon meeting all
applicants in his office in the old En-
gineering building from 2:00 until
4:00 o'clock daily.
An article appearing in The Daily
some days ago conveyed the impres-
sion that only women are to partici-
pate. Such is not the case, however,
and all men interested in ;he Shake-
spearean celebration are requested to
see those in charge. All posters en-
tered in the competition must be in
the hands of Professor Kenyon not
later than 4:00 o'clock this afternoon.
Report Says West Is Bankrupt
London, Mar. 14. -- The Gazette
states that a receiving order in bank-
ruptey has been made against George
Cornwallis West.

i
a
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versity of Louvain, Belgium, and Dr.
E. A. Loew, of the University of Ox-
ford, England, will each .eliver two
lectures here during the neeting of
the Michigan Schoolmasters' club, to
be held Ma:ch 2-31.
Professor Van den een is a bril-
liant historical scholar of -the Univer-
sity of Louvain, which was destroyed
early in the -war. In the winter of
1914 and 1915 he was a lecturer at the
University of Cambridge, Englan(. and
at present is stationed at Princeton
University
Profess yr Van den Ven, is the ai
thor of mmi, articles and several
books det.n=, with the histoy of the
Byzantine Empire and the Byzantine
art. He speaks English fluently and
will lecture on "The First and the
Second Fall of Constantinople," on
Tuesday, March 28, and on "Byzan-
tirne Monuments of Italy," Wednesday,
March 29.
Dr. E. A. Loew is among the most
eminent of the younger scholars in
(Continued on Page Six)

Italian Oftensive
fiegins on Isonzo

i
E
T
i
t
E'
Ol

Reports from the alumni in charge
of the concerts in the various cities
assure great plans for dinners, dances
and smokers to be given all along the.
route, so it is certain the entertain-
ment wil not be lacking. The man-
agement plans to reach Ann Arbor
on the evening of April 18.
OHIOANS HOLD FIRST SMOKER
Students From Biuckeye State Hear,
'Talk by Prof. Henderson and Music
With but few less than 100 inhabi-
tants from the Buckeye State pres-
ent, the first smoker of the Ohio club
proved to be a success in every re-
spect.
Professor Henderson, of the phy-
sics department, was secured to rep-
resent the faculty after Professor Fri-
day was unable to be present, and the
talk which he gave to the members
proved to be the big feature of the
evening. Dean J. DeButts, '18E, and
Halstead Cottington, '19, presented a
piano and banjorine novelty, with the
"Buckeye Orchestra" rendering sev-
eral selections between the numbers.
Owing to the success which followed
last evening's entertainment, the club
is planning an "Ohio dance" to be
given after spring vacation.

El Paso, Tex., Mar. 14,-As rigid a
censorship as prevailed in the Euro-
pean war zone was established, by
American forces along the Mexican
border today. Signal corps opera-
tors were put in charge of the tele-
graph and telephone offices at Co-
lumbus, N. M., the concentration point
of the American army of occupation.
Troops here were also placed on
guard in the offices of the dispatchers
of the railroads entering El Paso, so
that every personal and telephone con-
versation was heard by a military
man. The result was that the pub-
lic was denied all news regarding the
number of troops.
However, it was known that a spe-
cial train carrying army engineers ar-
rived here from San Antonio and one
company, said to be Company G, was
left in El Paso while three other com-
panies, said to have been Companies
E, H, and F, went west.
Great Secrecy Maintained
The greatest secrecy is being main-
tained as to the movement of the ae-
roplane corps from Fort Sam Houston
for use in the field in scouting Villa's
location. It is feared that the train
may be held up and it is believed here
that the aeroplane special passed
through early this morning and is now
in Columbus. Incoming passengers
from Columbus at noon today stated
that the military camp at Columbus is
assuming big proportions, but there
is no indication that the army will be
in readiness to move for three or four
days.
It was stated that the delay in get-
ting started is due to the lack of train
equipment and the remoteness of the
New Mexican and El Paso frontier
from the garrisons scattered through-
out the country. It was reported that
the first cavalry stationed at Praesidio
near San Francisco has reached Doug-
las, Ariz., where it will be stationed.
Confirm Suspicions of Plot
Suspicions of the police that Villa
sympathizers were plotting trouble in
El Paso were confirmed today when
Mauser rifles, ammunition, pistols, and
sabres were seized by the police from
a house on South El Paso street. .They
have been sent to Fort Bliss for safe-
keeping.
General Villa and his bandit band,
said by creditable authority to total
not more than 400, men, were today
heading for Galeana, east of Casas
Grandes, a distance of 27 miles. Five
columns of Carranza troops are in
pursuit of Villa, according to the Car-
ranza consul, Garcia. Every effort is
being made by the Mexicans to effect
the capture of Villa before the arrival
of American troops on the scene. The
Mexicans feel that it would be a re-
flection upon them to have the Ameri-
can troops effect the capture of the
bandit after the Mexican forces in
such large numbers have been at the
(Continued on Page Six)

Telegraph Service from Front Stopped'
Since Monday at Midnight;
r
Firing Is Heavyt
Rome, Mar. 14.-Telegrams from the
Italian front have been provisionally
suspended since midnight. The sus-
pension, it was announced, is to be
very shortly lifted and was caused by
military exigency. Meanwhile the
preliminary phase of an Italian offen-
sive is being successfully initiated on
the Isonzo, where the Austrian re-en-
forcements are unable to reach the
first line positions which the Italians
are shelling. The Italian artillery
fire is very intensive.
DEATH TAKES SENATOR
SHIVELY OF INDIANA
Washington, Mar. 14.-Senator Ben-
jamin F. Shively, of Indiana, died at
a hospital here late today after an
illness of many months. Senator
Shively, who has been in the Senate
since 1909, was ranking majority mem-
ber of the foreign affairs committee,
and until stricken by illness, had taken
a prominent part in upholding the-
hand of the administration in Con-
gress. He suffered from a complica-
tion of diseases.

WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Cold with northwest winds.
TODAY
2:00 to 4:00 o'clock-Pageant try-
outs, Prof. Kenyon's office, old Eng.
Building.
5:00 o'clock--Y. W. C. A., Vespers,
Newberry hall.
11:00 o'clock-Fresh Engineer as-
sembly, 348 Engineering building.
'TOMOJIRO W
2:00 to 4:00 o'clock-Pageant try-
outs, Prof. Kenyon's office, old Eng..
Building.
7:00 o'clock-Dr. Winter speaks on
"Roman Cities," Memorial hall.
4:00 o'clock-Senior lit meeting,
Tappan hall.

This Should Interest You

Another

Double

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(The Campus in Leap Year-
As it Should be and as it Is)

On Sale Friday

_Ie \RXLE

On Sale Friday

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