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March 14, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-14

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PAGE SIXTH MCHIA DAL

THE MIC' IQAN DAILY

t. ,

TAILORGRAM NO. 2
"The BestDressed Man inTown"
niay not be the thing that you are most desirous of having
said about you, but surely you appreciate the value of good
appearance.
This is assured in a Malcolm Made Suit, together with the
satisfaction of knowing in your clothes purchase you are show-
ing shrewd judgment, for in Malcolm Tailored Clothes you
get the most for your money.

. I

wIlI It's Here -

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The New 3A Special with the
NEW RANGE FINDER
Greatest Thing Out. Prices from $49.00 to $77.00

WlTNEY THEAT MARCH22

Mail Orders Now
FAR EWELL

LYNDON'S

19 NO, UNIVERSITY AVE.
Where You Buy Kodaks and Films

Greatest
English-Speaking
Actor

of

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DRESS SUITS
FOR HIRE

SHIRTS TO
ORDER

I

J. K.- MALCOLM

604 East Liberty

Malcolm Bldg.

SWAIN
I713 East Univ.

Makes the best Lantern Slides-plain
or colored-you can get anywhere in
the U. S.
P. S. Did you know that first and
last he has made over 25,000 Slides?

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Any time is the right time for a glass of
SMorning, noon, or night- "-r a V irst- quencher, or
austnew delicious heallu beverage-you will find
a new pleasure in every refreshiag gass.
THE COCA-COLA CO. r
Atlanta, Ga.

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Demand the genuine by fullname-
nicknames encourage substitution.

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ARCHITEC]TURALEXHIBIT
DRAWS CAMPUS INTEREST
Drawings Secured from Many Colleges
and Ateliers Over
Country
Considerable interest is being arous-
ed on the bampus by the exhibit of ar-
chitectural drawings now on exhibi-
tion in the upper display room of
Alumni Memorial hall. The display
is the combined work of architectural
students of a number of the colleges
and ateliers over the country.
To the untrained eye the drawings
are of interest because of their in-
trinsically beautiful drawing and the
coloring which they display. One of
the most artistic works in the exhibit
is the work of A. M. Kennedy of Cor-
nell, and represents a plan and a pic-
ture of an astronomical observatory
on a starry night. The colors are in
purple and black, done in water color.
"The End of a Reception Room," by
John A. Root, is a picture that has at-
tracted much attention. The coloring
scheme is purple and black and the
high tones of the picture are red. "A
Francis Ist Pavillion" is another draw-
ing that is one of the best in the ex-
hibit. The work is by Edwin A. Robin
and represents a .group of French
courtiers and soldiers on an ancient
Paris street, while from the over-
hanging porch of a quaint old house
a woman waves her hand to the gal-
lant gentlemen gathered below.
Ad. H. Gentry's Artist's House in
the Mountains" is one of the medallist
group. It shows the plan and draw-
ing of a blue house in some ideal
mountains. W. G. Agnew, Jr., has an-
other picture of this type, but his is
even more idealistically beautiful than
the first mentioned. The exhibit con-
sists of about 225 drawings and paint-r
ings.
Salesmanship Class to Meet Tonight
Men interested in salesmanship may
attend the class in that subject which
meets at 8:00 o'clock tonight at the
Y. M. C. A. About 60 men already
have enrolled in the class under the
direction of H. J. Ritzenheim, of the
R. C. Barnum company of Cleveland.
The James Knox course in salesman-
ship and business efficiency will be
studied. Beginning tomorrow, C. C.
Marshall, special trainer for the Bar-
num company, will be in Ann Arbor,
for ten days. According to Mr. Rit-
zenheim, this instruction will be val-
uable to men who wish to canvass
during vacations.
Patronize Daily Advertisers. **

Business

Topics

According to the Bache 4eview we
are exporting between 350,000 and
400,000 tons of steel and iron every
month. There is no prospect, while
the war lasts, of demand falling off
from this amount, because the English
and German manufacturers are usin%
all available materials and facilities
to the utmost for supplying their own
war materials.
For the last three or four years, the
annual additions made by the rail-
roads to their equipment have been
far below average. This is because
the railroads during that time have
had a grim contest with poverty, and
many roads have succumbed during
that period. For this reason the rail-
roads have gotten along with the
least possible equipment, and now,
swamped with the abnormal business
activity of the country, with the at-
tendant demand for increased trans-
portation facilities, they have become
badly crippled.
For weeks shippers all over the
country have been complaining to the
Interstate Commerce commission be-
cause of losses suffered through the
lack of facilities offered by the rail-
roads. The defense of the carriers
has been that the shortage of equip-
ment is due largely to the congestion
of export freight, due to the scarcity
of ships enough to carry goods when
they reach the coast.
There is no change in the business
situation. Steel, copper and other
metal businesses are making large
profits, with the demand unchecked,
even growing. Railroad equipment
makers are crowded with orders far
ahead and are making large margins
of profit. Ship builders are doing the
largest business during their history,
and even the railroads are prosperous.
However, this situation is offset to
some extent by the German complica-
tions and the prospect of labor dis-
putes.
The Review concludes with a glance
at the present outlook. The present
state of international affairs points
impressively to the need of complete-
ly eliminating politics from the sit-
nation. The President's insisting of
a def inite approval or disapproval by
Congress, but more especially of the
Democrats in Congress, will undoubt-
edly do much to clear the present
clouded atmosphere. At any rate, iti
seems that the country as a whole is
back of the President in his attitude
toward Congress.t
Advertizers in The Michigan Daily
are the reliable business men of the
city. It is to your advantage to tradei
with them. **w

WILSON PROGRAM
Hamilton Holt Advocates "League to
Enforce Peace" in Lecture
Sunday Night
"MAKE HASTE SLOWLY" SLOGAN
'Hamilton Holt, of New York, editor
of the Independent magazine, in a lee-
ture on "National vs. International
Preparedness" at the First Methodist
church Sunday evening, expressed his
approval of the military program o
President Wilson, and said that he
did not consider it a serious step to-
ward militarism, as that term is com-
monly understood. "We seem to be
safer at this time than at any time
in our history," he asserted, in reply
to those who would have us believe
that war clouds are now sweeping
down on us.
"Make haste slowly" was the slo-
gan of the address. "A sublime unsel-
fishness is demanded of us at this
time, and as a nation we must respond.
The question is not how can we as a
nation organize for war, but how can
we organize the world for peace."
Mr. Holt's proposal is that of the
"League to Enforce Peace," foster-
ed by ex-President William Howard
Taft. He would create two permanent
international tribunals, an Interna-
tional court of law, and a council of
conciliation, and any nation attempt-
ing to act independently, after having
subscribed to the articles of the
league, would be forced into acquies-
cense by the combined strength of the
remaining signatory powers.
The speaker ridiculed the idea that
Japan would attack us, and as for
danger from Germany, he called at-
tention to the depleted condition in
which that country will emerge from
this war.
The Taft "League to Enforce Peace"
- was first proposed by Mr. Holt in
the columns of the Independent, and
it was on his suggestion that the con--
ference met for organization in Inde-
pendence hall, Philadelphia, last
June. Since that time he has urged
the adoption of the plan both in his
magazine and on the lecture plat-
form. At the present time he is tour-
ing the states of the middle west in
the interests of the Peace league.
PROF, DAVIS INSPECTS SCHOOL
Instructor Is Making Survey for City
of Grand Rapids
Professor C. o. Davis, of the edu-
cational department, is in Grand Rap-
ids this week making a survey of the
Grand Rapids public schools. Profes-
sor Davis, in company with several
other educators investigates the meth-
ods of teaching, the general knowledge
of the pupils, and the conditions of
the pupils of the schools, and then
makes a report to the city of Grand
Rapids. This scientific examination
of schools is being started in almost
all of the larger cities of the country.
The board of examiners is presided
over by Dr. Charles H. Judd, director
of the School of Education, University
of Chicago.
FIRST TRES ROU(GE DRESS
REHEARSAL DISTINCT SUCCESS
(Continued from Page One)

have been carefully worked out by
the men in charge. The balcony scene
in which Grover and Sikes sing "Love
Is a Rainbow" is sure to meet the ap-
proval of any audience. In addition to
this the dancing and swaying of both
chorus and cast in the song "Down'
in My Old Town Canoe" will add life
and motion to the entire performance.
Final Rehearsal Tonight
Another complete dress rehearsal
with make-up will be held tonight. The
show will last about two hours and
forty-five minutes.
Tickets for the performances will
continue to be on sale at the Whitney
theater box office beginning at 10:00
o'clock this morning.
OUR SERVICE
ii always Gentlemanly, Courteous
and Prompt. Stark 2255.

Tues. Mar. 14-Margarita Fischer in
"The Dragon."
Wed., March i5 - Frederick Warde ill
"sgIas Marner." 15c.
Thurs., March 6-Valli Valli in "The
Turmoil." Booth Tarkington's story.

SEATS Monda,
March 2

Show., at .3.oo, 6:3o. 8:00, 9.30

Orpheu Theatre
The Home of Paramount and
Triangle Photoplays
Matinees, 2:O, 3:15 Fven ing, 6:,5, S:oo
9:15 Saturdays - folidays Continuous

I

Matinee at 2 p. m. Sharp
"HAML ET"
Shakespeare Ter - Con-
isary Celebration

.

MAJESTIC

Matinee Today
Tonight 7.30-9

Trues Mar, z-Helen Ware in Cross
Currents and Weber & Fields in Worst
of Friends. Evening 5c
Wed.. March 15 -Marguerite Clark in
"Wildflower." (Rebooked.)
Thurs.-Fri.. March 16-17 - Cleo Rigley
and Wallace Reid in"The Golden
Chance"' Evenings i~c.

i

Spring Hats Ready
FLAT BRIMS THE LATESTr
We have a large stock in all the new shapes
and colors. Get your Spring hat ofus. We
make hats. shape them to your' head and give
you inequalled service.
WE DO ALL K[NDS OF HAT WORK
S NT: Your last season's hat reblocked in-
to the new flat brim with a new band, -will
please you and save you $2 or $3.
LADIES: We rehlock Milans, Henips,
Panamas, etc., into the new Shapes. They
will please you.
FACTORY HAT STORE
Near Allenel Hotel 1:4 E. Huron St.
Fy. THE FAMOUS
Cox Sons and Vining
a CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS
for all College Degrees
'~ may be ordered now from
REV, WETMORE DIES SUNDAY
ie ired 1 mnister Graduate of Auburn
'i'leultlgical Seminary
Rev. W W. Wetmore, one of the old-
est and best known residents of Ann
Arbor, died at his home on West Hu-
ron street at 6:30 o'clock Sunday eve-
ning.
After taking his degree from the
Auburn Theological Seminary, Dr.
Wetmore began his ministry as sup-
ply pastor in the Presbyterian church
of this city. Since that time he has
occupied the pulpits of many of the
state's larger churches. He was
known throughout Ann Arbor for his
ever vigilant helpfulness to students
when in doubt or in financial need.
A number of years ago he retired
from active service and gave his time
and study to works of theological in-
terest. He was known to have read in
the -eigltborliood of 50,000 works of
this nature during his lifetime. He
was a member of Phi Beta Kappa
honorary fraternity and Delta Upsilon.
CAIIrANZX NOTIFIEI) BY LANSING
TIIAT u. S. WILL PERMIT FORCES
TO ENTER ON BXNI)IT PURSUIT
(Continued from Page One)
day pointed to the fact that the ad-
ministration and Congress are ex-
pecting trouble from. the Carranzistas.
Should these expectations be realized
it is admitted that a general invasion
of Mexico is inevitable. With these
possibilities in view, President Wilson
today had a long conference with
Speaker Clark and Majority Leader
Kitchin of the house at which he.
strongly urged that the preparedness
legislation of Lhv administration be
put through without delay.
Patronize Daily Advertizers. **

Another "Big Time" Vau'd Bill
"THE TETAZZINI oF
Couness an ~runVAJDLVILLL"
And Her Harpists in a Clever Offering
lanlon Bros. and Co. IN A LAUGEABLE
Trevit's Dogs MILITARY TRAINING
Brooks and Bowen DOTS OF JoY
nDe"THE SINGING GIRL AND
nn and ean THE MIMIC MAN"
Starting Thursday Night-3 Days
Only 2 Shows Daily 2.30-8.15 P. M.
AND hIFR SPLENDID CO.
Nancy BoyIN 3 DIFFERENT PLAYS

DETROIT
MR. E. H. SOTHERN
Cn "THE TWO VIRTUESE
AKCADE

Popular Mat.
Wednesday

Night
"Passing of the h
Floor Back"

PUBLIC OWNERSHIP TO
BE DEBATED MARCH 31
Governor Ferris Consents to Preside
at Home Contest With
Wisconsin
The question to be debated by the
teams of the Mi-West Oratorical as-
sociation March 31 was announced yes-
terday as follows: "Resolved that the
Federal government should own and
operate the public service telegraph
and telephone systems, constitutional-
ity waived."
Under the system now in- operation,
each member of the association se-
lects an affirmative and a negative
team. The negative teams debate away
from home, while the affirmative teams
meet their opponents on their home
platforms. This means that Wiscon-
sin will come to Ann Arbor, Illinois
will go to Wisconsin, and the Michi-
gan squad will debate at Illinois.
Work on these debates is progress-
ing rapidly under the direction of
nembers of the faculty of the ora-
torical department. Governor Wood-
bridge N. Ferris has consented to pre-
side at the Michigan-Wisconsin con-
test to be held here.
Company Inspected by Army Captain
The annual federal' inspection of
Company I, 31st Infantry, Michigan
National Guard, was held at the lo-
cal armory last evening. Captain F.
L. Wells, 26th United States Infantry,
was the inspecting officer. - About 50
men were in line, including university
men who are members. Capt. A. C.
Wilson is in command of the local
company.
Dr. Hulbert Explains Juvenile Cases
Dr. H. S. Hulberg, of the medical
faculty read a paper in Detroit lasi
night before the Wayne County Medi-
cal Society on "Juvenile Mental Con-
ditions Observed in the Chicago Ju-
venile Courts." His report covered
five cases.
Fresh Mandolin Club Holds Practice
Freshmen who are interested or
members of the Fresn mandolin club.

R. IN TALKSON USE
OF TOBASCOPAIACAE
Speaker Says "Habit Reduces Efficieii.
cy and Lends to Other
Vices
Dr. Ihomas Iden, of the Upper Room
Bible class, spoke on "The Tobaccc
Habit." Sunday evening at the "Y'
meeting in the Arcade theatre.
Dr. Iden divided his lecture into
number of heads. He stated that the
use of tobacco is, in the first place, a
hindering habit. Many employers will
not hire men if they acknowledge that
they are addicted to the tobacco hab-
it. Some state universities in their
application blanks which they mail
out to the aspirants for eaching posi-
tions, asking whether the person
smokes or not.
That the tobacco habit is harmful
to the persons who indulge in it, was
the speaker's second point. From ex-
periments by an eminent German sci-
entist, he said that it has been shown
that th$ habit deducts from a man's
highest efficiency. According to the
speaker, the use of tobacco, besides be-
ing an expensive and offensive habit
is also a selfish habit.
In concluding his remarks Dr. Iden
said that the habit is a suggestive one.
Most all drinkers, he stated, are first
smokers.
"Thereason so many college stu-
dents smoke,' remarked the speaker,
"is because that fashion has decreed
it. I, myself, could not smoke and be
a gentleman, although there are many
men no doubt who can do so."
MANITOBA GOES DRY BY 2 TO 1
VOTE; WINNIPEG CARRIED
Winnipeg, Mar. 13.-Manitoba went
dry today by a 2 to 1 vote and, ac-
cording to the pledge of Premier Nor-
ris, elected last year, that at the ear-
liest day possible he would submit
prohibition measures with no war
time limitation in the duration of its
force. Winnipeg carried the measure
-by nearly 3 to 1. The measure is for

GARRICK Marche 3th

Forbes-

Robertson-
(His First and Last Visit to Ann Arbor)
AND LONDON COMPANY

PRICES

$2, $1.50, $l
?5c and 50c

should meet at 7:30 o'clock this evening state-wide prohibition and goes into
at McMillan hall. The members should effect automatically, with refusals to
all bring their instruments, as the renew licenses.
meeting will be given over to prac-
ticing new pieces. Patronize Dally Advertizers. **

SPECIAL SALE
of all-Coilet articles
Look iin th. windows
At the only
tudentSupplyvn Soe
liii S. Uni. Av.Opp. Eng.

Ar

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