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March 11, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OFTHE DAILY AN
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PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXVI No. 110,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1916.

Wm . BRYAN TO,
GIVE LECTURE IN
HILL ATR IU

EX-SECRETARY OF STATE
SPEAK UNDER AUSPICES
OF UNIVERSITY "Y"

T )

PROCEEDS FOR RELIEF FUND
More Than $1,090,000* Already Spent
by Y. f. C. A. Organization in
War-tornEEurope
William Jennings Bryan, ex-Secre-
tary of State, pacifist, and orator, will
appear in Hill auditorium tonight un-
der the auspices of the university "Y"
to speak upon the subject of "The War
and Its Lessons for 'Us." Proceeds
from this speech will go to aid the
relief work which is being done by the
Y. M. C. A. organizations in the war
zone of Europe.
More than $1,000,000 has already
been sent from the United States for
the furtherance of this great move-
ment, which is secondonly to the ef-
forts of the Red Cross society in alle-
viating misery in the field ,hospitals
and prison camps of Europe. A. Y. M.
C. A. man is appointed director in
each place,,with $2,000 to spend as he
considers ,best to meet the peculiar
needs of that location.
-The success of this work is due to
the earnest co-opertin of the mili-
tary authorities of every nation. They
lend support', only requiring that no
military secrets which come to the
ears of the directors are sent to the
American press.
Owing to the gigantic size of this
work, the general secretary of the
World's Studnt Christian Association
has sounded the call for additional
funds, and the proceeds from tonight's
lecture will be part of the contribu-
tion from the university "Y".
During his short stay in Ann Arbor,
Mr. Bryan will delivert)vo speeches.
In addition to his lecture in Hillau
itorium he is to address the workers
of the Busrahi campaign at 4:00 o'clock
in Newberry hall on the subject of
"The First Comndment." Origin-
ally the public was to have been ex-
cluded from this meeting, but a few
extra tickets are left which will be
(Continued on Page Six)
IMKE PERSONALPPEL
TO UNCHURCHED STUDENTSr
More Than 3,040 Letters Sent Out in
Effort to Promote "no-to-
Ci"ourcit Sunday"
More than 3000 personal letters have
been sent out by representatives of
the various Ann Arbor churches to
students in an effort to promote the
"Go-to-Church Sunday" which is to
be held tomorrow. In addition, sev-
eral thousand cards were given out
on the campus today and large pla-
cards have been placed in all of the
bulletin boards and stores surrounding
the campus.
Hamilton Holt, editor of the Ind-
pendent magazine, is scheduled to
speak Sunday evening in the Metho-
dist church, while special preachers
have been secured in most of the other
local churches to deliver special ser-
mons either morning or evening.
The hours of service at all of the
churches are 10:30 in the morning
and 7:30 in the evening. In addition,
a special early service is held in the
Episcopal church at 7:30 o'clock in
the morning at wich time the holy'
communion is celebrated.
The movement is an effort to intere3t
the 3500 unchurched students on the
campus in one of the local denomina-
tional bodies.

HAMILTON HOLT WILL
DISUSS PREPAREDNESS
Editor of Independent Comes Under
Ausplces of Wesleyan Guild
On Lecture Tour
Hamilton Holt, editor of The Inde-
pendent, will speak tomorrow night
in the Methodist church at 7:30 o'clock.
'he subject of his lecture will be "Na-
tional vs. International Prepa redness."
Mr. Holt has for the last 15 years
been an advocate of international
peace. He has probably published more
in a constructional way on the sub-
stttution of law for war than any
other author.
Just before the outbreak of the pres-
ent war in Europe.- Mr. Holt was en-
gaged in the establishment of a league
of peace. He believes in a peace fed-
eration of the world. For many years
he has lectured throughout the coun-
try on international peace, and has
spoken before nearly all national and
international peace societies.-
He is a member of the executive
committee of several international
peace societies, and in 1909 he wads
decorated by the Emperor of Japan
with the Order of the Sacred Treasure,
for developing friendly relations be-
tween Japan and the United States.
Mr. Holt is coming to Ann Arbor
under the auspices of the Wesleyan
Guild. His last visit to this city was
a year ago last November when he
spoke to a capacity audience. He is
at present on a lecture tour in Ohio
and Michigan. . -
Germany Declares
War on Portugal
Announcement Made Wednesday; Over
Seas Agency Issues State-
luelt.
Berlin, Mar. 10.-Germany declared
war on Portugal at 3:30 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon. The declaration
was handed to the Portuguese govern-
ment by the German minister at Lis-
bon and was presented to the Portu-
guese minister in Berlin who was
handed his passports.
In announcing the declaration of wa
the Overseas agency, the official news
bureau of the German government, is-
sued the following statement:
"The German declaration emphasizes
the fact that this step was made neces-
sary by the recent illegal seizures of
German ships in Portuguese ports,
which is the gravest sort of breach of
neutrality and of special treaties. Ger-
many therefgre is obliged to give up
her former attitude of forbearance,
which she had maintained because of
Portugal's awkward situation."
PRES, FOST LECTURES
HERE TOMORROW NIGHT
"Abraham Lincoln of South" to Gie
Talk on "Our Contemporary
* A ncestors"
President William Goodell Frost, of
Berea college, Ky., known as the
"Abraham Lincoln of the South" to
over 5,000,000 residents of the Ten-
nessee, Kentucky,. Virginia and Caro-
lina mountains, will deliver a lecture
on "Our Contemporary Ancestors" in

the Presbyterian church at 7:30 o'clock
Sunday evening under the auspices of
the Tappan Presbyterian association.
President Frost's lecture will con-
cern the recently discovered moun-
taineers of the Appalachian chain,
who have been lost to the rapid devel-
opment to the rest of America, and
who still have the language and cus-
(Continued on Page Six)

New YorIk, Mai. 1.-Alphonse G.
Koelble, president of the United Ger-'
man Societies whose name has been
mentioned frequently in connection4
with the German propaganda declared
today that the Teutonic societies in
this country have fixed upon Justice
Charles E. Hughes of the supreme
court as their candidate for President.
('They are unanimous for Hughes,"
he said. 'They are absolutely opposed
to Theodore Roosevelt or Elihu Root
and would support Woodrow Wilson in
preference to either.
"Failing to get Hughes they would
be for Senator Borah or Senator Cum-
mins or any other man who has not
ben pro-ally."
FORT VAUX AGAIN'
Allies ('ontinue Repulse of Teuton's
IDesperate Artillery Attack
on Verdun
RUSSI A\NS IN VADE NORT I TURKEY
London, Mar. 1.-With Fort Vaux
again in French hands, according to
the official statement from Berlin to-
day, the crown prince's troops this
afternoon launched a new and desper-
ate artillery attack against the entire
French line east of Verdun, pouring3
thousands of tons of explosives into
the French position.
The official statement issued at Paris
at midnight discloses a violent artit-

I

EXACT NTiMBE OF SOLDIERS TO
RE lDISPATCHEID KEPT
SECRET.
ARMY GENERAL STAFF MEETS;
Fin ton, Leader of Troops oat Border,
(haiirdl Fai(e as Captor of
A gminaldo.
AWashington, Mar. 10.-Considerable
secrecy marked the movements of the
war department of icials today. The
general staff of the armyheld a four-
hour meeting, but what was discussed
was not made known.

pursued by the administration toward
the Mexican question.

Hughes Choice of PRESIDENT ORDERS AMERICAN TROOPS INTO MEXICO
German ElementM
CESocietiesHaveDecided TOCAPTUREEVINNINGILLABEOF
Supp grt Justice for 1916
NominatIon, >. GENERAL INTERVENTION..DESPITE'WILSON'S EFFORTS

CARRAN Z11TA5 PUIISt V ILLA- -
Columbus, N. M., aIEXPEITN MERELY PUNITIVE
troops today began a r , ith\~
(Continued O SIx)_ - Appointed Secretary laker
--- euds Orders to Major Gen-
Societies Holdoral Funston
Dt( s ington, Mar. 10.-President
Wils-z tonight ordered approximately
-1- 00. troops into Mexico as a punitive
Fifty Couples Attend Annual Afil} ni 'Ien "diqnrvta

DECISION MADE AT CARl
MEETING HELD) DURING
AFTERNOON

of Barristers, Vulcans,
and Druids

The conference of the President and To the tuneful melodies of a special
the secretary of war followed this con- orchestra, 50 couples, representing the
sultation of the army staff. The evi- three senior honorary societies, danced
Bence of course was based largely upon at the Union last night at the annual
the report of Major General Frederick B. V. D. affair. The hall was decorated
H. Funston, the commander of all the in black and white, while the orches-
troos oil the border tra was seated in the center of the

Army circles were of the opinion that
no matter what adroit steps the ad-
ministration took to avoid conflict with
Carranza. before the present expedi-
tion has completed all. its work practi-
cally all of Mexico will be in arms
against the United States.
Information as to the number and
character of troops to be emploed was
purposely suppressed in line with the
recommendations of General Funston,
who urged that every opportunity be
given him to surprise the enemy. j
REPORT SCATHES CA RRA NZ
The commancier-, report was a
scathing denunciation of the ineffec-
tiveness and unreliability of the Car-

dance floor in an artistically construct-
ed pergola.
The affair went off without a hitch
and the merry couples danced till the
first hours of Saturday were passed.
The chaperones were Dean John R.
Effinger, of the literary college, and
Mrs. Effinger, and Prof. John R. Rood,
of the law school, and Mrs. Rood.
Begin Student
Council Dances

I

First

of "Overflow" Affairs Will
leld Tonight at Packard
Actidmdny

BeI

lery attack against Eix, Moulainville, ranza forces, which otherwise he said-
Villeres-Sous-Bouchant and Vougee, might be expected to capture the raid- Proceeds from. the recently institut-
whiclie to the east of Verdun anders ed "'niversity dances" under the aus-
Itsh e expected that the troop which pices of the Student Conc11l will be
Russians Threaten Trebizond will form the American command will given over to local charity. The first
Washington, Mar. 10. - Russian consist principally of cavalry and dance is to be held in Packard acad-
troops have landed on the Black sea mountain artillery and will be under emy tonight, beginning at 9:00 o'clock.
coast of Asiatic Turkey and the occu- the personal command of General Fun- The aim of these dances is to afford
pation of Trebizond is imminent, ac- ston. Funston is known chiefly as the an opportunity for students unable to
cording to a dispatch received today man who captured Aguinaldo, the Fili- obtain tickets to the regular weekly
from the American embassy at Con- pino brigand, affairs at the Union to dance.
stanrtinople. PREPA RE FOR TUE WORST They are in no way competi-,
Ilian Socialist Attack Cabnet While every effort is being made by five with 'lie Union and at any time
Rome, Mar. 10.-The official social- the government to avoid any act which thia organization ,an give all who
ists who opposed Italian entrance into will enable Carranza and his followers wish to dar;e a chance 6. do so, the
the war now hope to join forces with to line against the American invasion, "univ rz:ty darnce" for that veek will
the interventionists who are threaten- thorough preparations have been made be cancelled.
ing that they will not support the gov- by the war department for such even- Chaperons for this evening's dance
ernment unless war is declared on tualities as a stand of this kind might will be: Professor Emil Lorch and
Germany. The plan of these two fac-
bring about. It is openly declared-in Mrs. Lorch, Dr. A. W. Hewlett and
tions is to provoke the resignation of TWaslhington that in no case can there Mrs. Hewlett. Tickets will again be
the cabinet. be any co-operation between the Amer-I put on sale in the corridor of Univer-j
Extra Canadian Contingent Opposed ican and Carranza troops. sity hall between 10:00 and 12:00
Montreal, Mar. 10.-Opposition to Sir The position of the administration is o'clock and between 2:00 and 3:00
Robert Borden's planĀ§ to raise the made doubly difficult by the fact that o'clock. Any remaining tickets will
Canadian contingent in the European it is known that the last unprovoked be on sale at the Packard academy at
war to 500,000 men was voiced to- raid, as well as those which have pre- 8:00 o'clock.
day by Lord Shaughnessy, president of ceded it, was undertaken for the pur-
the Canadian Pacific railroad company, pose of discrediting Carranza and forc-
at a meeting of business men held here gt
ing American intervention. Villa hopes
today. Lord Shaughnessy said he does that public opinion in Mexico will
not regard the plan as practicable and unite against Carranza and the United
that if Canada is to attempt to raise States. Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
225,000 men the working population .
would be seriously depleted. A flood of protests caine into Wash- ity: Cold with moderate northwest
ington today with every mail. It seems winds.
that the whole country has been.---
U-NOTICE aroused by the raid on the peaceful TODAY
Craftsmen, Student Masonic society, New Mexican town. Congressmen, 4:00 o'clock-W. J. Bryan speaks on
will confer the first degree for one of both Democratic and Republican, ex- "The First Commandment," Newber-
the local lodges on Saturday night, pressed themselves today as favoring ry hall.
March 11. All Masons invited. 'an entire change in the policy thus far 6:00 o'clock-Y. W. C. A. and Y. M.
'0 A ~iia Ainrt ~ trhr-rh1

the Villa forces which early yesterday
morning attacked the town of Colum-
bus, N. M.,
Execution of the order will be car-
ried out at once. By daybreak tomor-
row it is expected the American forces
will be well into Mexican territory.
With the, growing prospect of ac-
tive opposition by General Carranza,
head of the de facto government, there
is apprehension in officialcircles that
the present move may mean the be-
ginning of general intervention. Pub-
licly, however, the administration is
taking every precaution to prevent
such a possibility,
PRESIDENT MAKES STATEMENT
The decision to act was made at
an afternoon meeting of the cabinet,
which las held several meetings since
yesterday morning. At the conclusion
of this afternoon's session, the Presi-
dent authorized the following state-
ment:
"An adequate force will be sent in
pursuit of Villa with the single ob-
ject of 6apturing him and putting a
stop to his forays. This can and will
be done in entirely friendly aid of the
constituted authorities in Mexico and
scrupulous respect for the sovereignty
of that republic."
In discussing the course to be pur-
sued, President Wilson is reported to
have declared to the members of his
cabinet:
"Gentlemen, we have set our hand
to the plow and we must go to the end
of the furrow."
BAtER ANNOUNCES COURSE
Altl, the entire day was given by
t'? administraticu and the war depart-
rient w a consideration of the exact
course to 1,e purs e, it was not until
7:.0 o'clock this evcning that Secre-
tary of War Baker, following a confer.
ence with the President, announced
that the orders to be followed were
embodied in the following:
"There is no intention of entering
Mexico in force. A sufficient body of
mobile troops will be sent in to locate
and to dispose of the band that at-
tacked Columbus. So soon as the forces
of the de facto government can take
control of the situation any forces of
the United States then remainiing in
Mexico will, of course, be withdrawn.
"The forces of the United States
now on the border will be immediate-
ly recruited, but only for the purlpse
of safeguarding the territory of the
United States from further raids."
NOT TO ASK FOR VOLUNTEERS
This statement by the newly-ap-
pointed secretary of war sets at rest
all the rumors to the effect that the
administration was to ask for several
hundred thousand citizen volunteers
As long as the President has decided
to repose trust in the ability of Car-
ranza to really govern Mexico, there
is no need for such a large force.
It is very probably that t'he troops
located on the border will be able
to take Villa, although that chieftain
has retired with several thousand fol-
lgwers to the mountains.
According to information furnished

r

"Go-To-Church Sunday"
Presbyterian Church '." Sunday, March 12
10:30 a. m., Sermon by Mr. Barrett
Theme: "The Christ of Paul"
University Bible Classes at Noon
7:30 p. m., Tappan Address, by President Frost of Berea
College, Kentucky

U. A. ca ine s uinner, Newberry naii.
7:00 .oclock-Upper Room Bible
class meets, 444 S. State street.
8:00 o'clock-W. J. Bryan speaks on
"The War and Its Lessons for Us,"i
Hill auditorium.
9:00 o'clock-Union dance, Union.!
TOMORROW

10::30 o'clock-Lieut. Gov. L. D. Dick- thewardepartment by Major General
enson speaks, Unitarian church. # Funston, Villa with a force of approxi-
6:30 o'clock-Professor Iden speaks mately 3000 men has been .ocated be
on "The Tobacco Habit," Arcade thea- scouts a short distance south of the
ter. border.

Main Floor 25c

TVilia Je nnings Bryan

TICKETS

Hill Auditorium

Balconies Free

Subject

to Students

"The War and ItsLessons to Us"

Box Office
and "Y"

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