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March 09, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-09

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VOL. XXVI. No. 108.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

START CAMPAIGN
TO MAKE HURON
SAFE FOR CgANES
MOTOR-CYCL I POLICE MEN TO PA-
TROL IANE ROUS PARTS
OF IIVER

BRYAN TO TALK ON THE
WAR1AND ITS LESSONS
Former Secretary Pays Aib Expeiases;
lProeeeds t~o to War
Relief
Willi am Jennings Bryan will speak
in iil auditorium at 8:010 o'clock Sat-
urday evening on "The War and Its

_____ LF.<sons for Us." Ie will also give
WILL TAKE IMEIA 'At TINan address in New brry hail in the
LL T!EAEtT n <ioon at 4:00 on 'The First Con-
_naudnf it." The, former secretary

Student docinci, (lily Offiials and
1'dLisOn (1Conpa'i3 nnite to Povi le
Protection
Life preservers, telephones, numer-
ous signs, and life boats will be used
in the "Safety First" campaign for pro-
tection along the Huron river, accord-
ing to the plan decided upon at a ioint
meeting of Ann Arbor city otlicials, rep-
resentatives from the Student Coun-
cil, and the Eastern Michigan Edison
company, held yesterday afternoon at
the office of the city engineer.
Immediate action will be taker to-
wards rendering the river safer for
the use of canoeists. Three tele-
phones will be installed between Argo
and Barton dams, with large signs
along the shore telling their location
and the telephone number of the Edi-
son company, wher~e pulmotors are.
kept. 0
In addition, these signs will bear
warnings and give the location of four
life boats, each \ equipped with life
preservers, oars, rope anl grapples,;
Which will be placed along the same
stretch.
A movement is under way to have
an inspection of all canoes to be rent-
ed. Those unfit for use will be done
away with, and replaced by canoes
equipped with.air tight compartments.
Life preservers are to be placed in
each boat. The river bed itself will
be attended to, stumps and posts being
removed, while at the narrow place
in the Huron near the old Argo dam
the bed of the stream is to be widened
in order to stop the rush of the cur-
rent.
Motorcycle policemen will be put
on a beat from the Argo to the 13ar-
ton dam as summer approaches, to
keep watch of the river and see that
the life preserving facilities are in
proper + condition, according to the
present plan of the combined commit-
tee.
The policemen and boats are to be
furnished by the Ann Arbor city gov-
ernment, while the students of the uni-
versity will provide the life preserv-
ers. The other material is to be don-
ated by the Eastern Michigan Edison
conpany.
Pamphlets from the health service
describing the proper way to handle
a canoe, and the method of resuscita-
tion are to be printed and distributed
among the students. A large number
will be left at the boat house.
A special nieeting ofdthe Student
Council has' been called for 7:15
o'clock this evening in University hall.
Policeman Stops Ford for Speeding
A Ford automobile bearing license
number 2660 was halted for fast Criv-
ing by a traffic officer on State street
at 7:00 o'clock last evening. The
occupants, four in number, were or-
dered to report in police court at 9:00
o'clock this morning.

of state will be the principal speaker
at a complimentary dinner to be

given to all workers in the Busrah
campaign in Newberry hall at 5:30
o'clock.
Mr. Bryan is coming to Ann Arbor
at his own expense. Proceeds from,
the evening lecture, the admission to
which will be 25 cents, will be used
chiefly for funds for Y. M. C. A. work
in the trenches in Europe. When
Mr. Pryan was asked to speak for
this cause he replied that not only
would he lecture for nothing, but
that he would even pay his own rail-
road fare.
TO ENTERTAIN COSMOPOATES
ir on" Will Stage Competitive i*nter-
lainimet March l0
Tlhe Cosmopolitan club will be the
guests of the Union on the evening of
March 30, when the members of this
organization and the members of the
Union will put on a competitive en-
tertainment. It is expected that sev-
eral of the feature acts of the All-Na-
tion Revue participated in by the for-
eign students will be used that night.
The follawing committee is in charge
of the program and will announce the
list of stunts shortly: Howard E. Ram
sey, '17E, chairman; W. K. Lovering,
'17; E. C. Wunsch, '18; George Ohr-
strom, ',; H. M. Reeves, '18; L. G.
Hulbert, '17E.
Prof. Iden Will
Give "Y ''alk
Weslern ('Iiemist Will (ive Lecture on
"The Tobacco Habit"
Sunday
Prof. T. N. Iden will be the speaker
at the "Y" Arcade meeting next Sun-
day. His subject will be "The To-
bacco Habit." Professor Iden is very
familiar with the tobacco problem and
tells some interesting stories in con-
nection with it. He has had 0 years
experience in chemistry as a professor
of chemistry in a western university.
Professor Iden has lectured here be-
fore on the tobacco question, having
conducted the "Upper Room" Bible
class.
KENYON WILL LECTURE TODAY
To Gi-e Talks on "Spanish Ballads"
as Third of Spanish Series
"Spanish Ballads" will be the sub-
ject for the third lecture of the Span-
ish series to be delivered by Prof. Her-
bert Kenyon of the engineering col-
lege in room 101 S. W. at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon.
This lecture, which will be in Span-
ish, is under the auspices of the Latin-
American club and the Spanish de-
partmient, and is open to all advanced
students in Spanish and any others in-
' iested
The first two lectures were delivered
by Professor BonIla. Profes or Wag-
ner and others of the department will
t i : the remaining numbers of the
series.
s'ARIO I E( 1 lI 1TU R E G ETS
II U(IE PRO1101 IBltTION PETITION

CHARGE EI H. GARY
WITH CONSPIRING
TO LOWER WAGES
AI'TER I RESULT OP B RIOT
WHICI- Of'(URRE) ON ,
JANU ARY 7
JURY RETURNS INDICTMENTS
Officials of Six Large Steel Companies
With Plants at E. Youngstown
Also Indicted
Youngstown, Ohio, Mar. 8.-Judge?
E. H. Gary, chairman of the board oft
directors of the United States Steel
corporation and the officers and di-
rectors of six large steel companies
with plants at East Youngstown, were
indicted today by a Mahoning county
grand jury which charged them with
having conspired to keep down the
wages of common laborers.
More than 114 persons were indicted'
in all. There are 62 counts in which
Judge "ary and the steel corporation
are included. The whole matter re-
volves around the big riot in East
Youngstown on January 7, in which
four lives were lost, 37 persons were
injured, and property was damaged
by fire to the amount of $1,000,000.
The grand jury says that no for-
eign 'gover'nment was responsible for
inciting the irioting or the strike of
whivcht her iot was a part.
Gary Dictaites Reply
New York, Mar. S.-When the at-
tention of Judge- Gary was called to
the indictment, he dictated this state-I
ment:
"There are no facts to justify teI
indictment returned by the Mahoning
county grand jury against the Unitedj
States Steel corporation or the Car-
negie steel company or any of the offi-
cers or, so far as I know, of any of the
other companies. The indictment. is

ORCIESTRA REhiEARSES TODAY
The first costume parade of the cast
and chorus of the Union opera "Tres
Rouge' will be held tomorrow night,
according to the present plans of the
committees in charge. Both costumes
and scenery are scheduled to arrive
some time tomorrow. No definite place
for the dress rehearsal has been de-
eided upon as yet. but it is likely that
it will be held at Hill auditorium.
According to Director Morgan the
sshow would be in readiness to be given
Saturday night, thus indicating the
rapidity with which this year's opera
has been whipped into shape. Wh le
previous productions have taken
long as five or six weeks, the ope
this year has had but four weeks
prepare for the first performance.
Ten students attended the meeting
held for the opera writers yesterday,
and considerable enthusiasm was
shown as regards the new plan adopt-
ed by ie book committee. The men
who attended were given suggestions
by Director Morgan, and in about three
weeks the plots for next year's show
will be handed in."
An orchestra rehearsal will be held
at Hill auditorium at 8:00 o'clock to-
night.
DICKINSON. TALKS
ON~JRLD FFAIRS
Antlor of "Letters of John ('lihnman"
Will Give Lecture
CNES FO1 PEACE FOUNDI)ATION

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IVANT TO DISCONTINUE
MII)-IVEEK l) ANCES
Favoring the movement to
abolish mid-week campus dances,
the heads of league houses, at a
meeting yesterday, heartily en-
dorsed a petition to the Senate
Council to that effect. This ac-
tion is 1n accordance with the
growing feeling among the wom-
en of the campus, and comes
through the representatives of a
large number of them.

To Hold Costume FRENCH STRENGTHEN WEAKENEDPzrd Fi LINELI
to Write '-ext
s Opera' AISIAN TAKE Hill NEAR THRIM

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an outrage, a travesty." ("1."owes Bickinson, whose lecture
on "International Reconstruction Af-
ter the War" will be given in Sarah
iCasell Angell hall at 8:00 o'clock
tonight is recognized as on6 of the
greatest masters of prose style now
living. In the United States he is
best known for his two books "Letters.
- a of John Chinaman"r and "A Modern
Small (hildreni in ermanan Act Receive
The first named volume appeared
Repeated A ; p 1 atse; me. 'asch anonymously in 1902 and created a
Awain Pleases furor over the country, everyone who
Y.P(l.1.! T'l 1SHOW) 13T IMPROVE 3IENT read it being convinced that the au-
thor was a Chinese. At that time
William Jennings Bryan made the
Michigan's foreign students scoredIstatement that the author never saw
an unqualified success in the secondss
performance of the All Nation Re- I t i de o ympWsnm.
vue given last night in Hill auditori- "A Modern Symposium," which ap-
um before an audience of 4,00peo- peared later under the author's name
pie. From te primitive tom-tom secured an appreciative circle of
war dance rof the AricanZuls tot readers at once, and is still cited as
the magnificent. spectacle of Human- one of the most charming bits of lit-
ity reviewing (.he, cast of more than erature appearing in recent times.
200 as they slowly made the steep Aside from his literary pursuits,
ascent of the path of progress,. the Mr. Dickinson is well known as an
entire ensembl singing the "Pit- authority gn the subject of interna-
grim's Chorus~ from . Thannhauser, tional relations, his association with
the Revue was. one of the most ef- prominent international thinkers in
fective pageants ever produced in England and elsewhere having given
Ann Arbor. him unusual opportunities for study-
Albertina :Rasch, premiere dan- ing world affairs.
seuse of the Metropolitan Opera of Since the outbreak of the war he
New York and of the Royal Opera of has been a frequent contributor to the
Vienna, carried the house by storm magazines of both England and Ameri-
with her interpretive dancing. Her ca. Of special interest are his ar-
work, especially in the Hungarian ticles entitled "After the War" and
dance, was roundly applauded by the I "The War and the Way Out," which
audience. Madame Rasch is without ran in the Atlantic Monthly.
doubt, ore of the finest exponents of The lecture tonight is given under
classic dancing that has appeared in the auspices of the World Peace
Ann. Arbor within recent years. Foundation, and the general public is
The dancing of Miss Dorothy Conger invited to attend.
of Detroit and her ballet of four danc-
ing girls in the Greek act was effect-
ive and was one of the bright spots inIROOSEVELT NOT A CANDIDATE
a succession of appealing acts.
The music of the second perform- Cables I)isavowal in Dispatcl to Secre-
ance showed considerable improve- tary of State of Illinois
ment o% er that of the previous eve-
ning and the co-ordination of the New York, Mar. 8.-Colonel Theo-
work of the orchestra and the per-' dore Roosevelt has cabled disavowing
formers lent the final touch to the his candidacy for the presidency.
success of the venture. His secretary today sent the 'fol-
The scenic. and lighting effects lowing dispatch to the secretary of
showed the results of the experi- state of Illinois: "I have today re-
ence gained, by the men Tuesday eve- ceived ,the following cable'for trans-
ning and n.o serious mishap occurred mission to you-
to break the continuity of the pro- "'I hereby disavow candidacy of any
gram. 'labo:rate and involved as and all delegates in Illinois primaries
were sone of the scenes, neverthe- who file petitions expressing prefer-,
less the audience was never forced to ence for me for presidential nomina-
(Colitinu(d on Page !Six) tion. Theodore Roosevelt.' "

goS OSIWSPEAK ON CHINA
Hon. Chas.Denby to Give Address at
S :00 o' (lock Tonight in New
Science 1Building
LECTURE TO BE ILLUSTRATED
wThe material for the lecture "China
and the Chinese Language;" to be de-
livered by the Hon. Charles Denby in
the auditorium of the new science
building at 8:00 o'clock tonight, is
drawn entirely from the speaker's
own experiences in that interesting
country. A period of 14 years spent
in the United States consular serv-
ice at Peking, Tientsin, and Shanghai
afforded unexcelled opportunities for
a study of the customs and language.
of the Chinese people, and as a re-
sult Mr. Denby is known as an an-
th"erity on that subject.
After graduating from Princton. in
1832, lie was appointed to the secre-
taryship of the Peking legation. From
1902 to 1905 he was foreign adviser
to the Governor General of North
China, and in 1907 became Consul
General at Shanghai. Since June,
1909. he has held the corresponding
post at Vienna, Austria.
Mr. Denby is a brother of ex-Con-
gressman Edwin Denby of Detroit.
While here he will be entertained at
dinner by President Hutchins and
.Mrs. Hutchins.
The lecture will be fully illus-
trated, and an invitation to attend is
extended the general public.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Warmer, -with variable winds.
4:00 o'clock-Comedy club meets,
Cercle Francais rooms.
4:30 o'clock-Professor Kenyon gives
Spanish lecture, room 101 S. W.
7:00 c'clock---Girls' Upper section of
Deutscher Verein meets, Verein rooms,
University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Colorado club meets,
Michigan Union.
8:410 o'clock---Chas. Denby lectures,
Natural Science auditorium.
8:00 o'clock--G. Lowes Dickinson
Science club, room Z261, new sience
speaks, Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
8:15 o'clock -Meeting of Natural
building.
8:45 o'clock-Keystone club dance,
Packard academy.
TOMORROW
4:1i o'clock--Students' recital, Uni-
versity School of Music.
4:15 and 8:00 o'clock--Prof. W. S.
Tower speaks, Natural Science Build-
ing auditorium.
7:30 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, room
101, U-hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster Debating so-
ciety meets, Webster rooms, Law build-
in-
U-NOTCE
Tryouts for the J-lit relay team re-
port to F. P. Randall at Waterman
gymnasium at 3:30 o'clock this after-
noon.

AUSTRIANS GAIN 1000 YARDS OF
TRENCHES NORTHWEST
OF PARNOPIL
METIZ RAIDED BY AEROPLANES
PortmmguesA Minister to Get Papers ai
Saturday Unless German Boats
Are Returned
London, Mar.S8.-England is mo-
mentarily awaiting the dews that
a great naval battle between the
British and German fleets has tak-
en place between the British and
German fleets has taken place in
the North Sea.
The latest report indicating that
the German fleet has put to sea
cane from Scheveningen by way of
Rotterdam.
The captain of a Dutch lugger
which imit in at the former port
reported lmaving sighted a German
fleet of 29 ships icluding battle-
ships, battle cruisers, small cruis-
ers, and destroyers off Ymnuiden,
75 miles north of The Hague and
directly opposite Yarmouth, Eng
land.
London, Mar. 8.--Recovery of the
reeling French line west of the Meuse
and the recapture of positions lost to
the Germans yesterday, with a conse-
quent lessening of the menace upon
Verdun, which has been growing in
that quarter for a week, is revealed
in the midnight statement from Paris.
Though Berlin officially announces
the capture of nearly 4,000 men and
almost eight square miles of terri-
tory in the section from Bethincourt
westward to the 'Meuse the midnight
statement makes no admission of such
loss.
On the contrary, it announces the
capture of most of the Corbeaux wood
in which the Germans established
themselves yesterday.
SLAVS OC(UPY PERSIAN TOWN
Petrograd, via London, Mar. 8.
Russian troops have captured the
town of Riza on the Black sea, 35
inilese ast of Trebizond, according to
an official report. The Russians also
have occupied the town of Sehna, in
Persia, the report adds.
CAPTUREE TRENCIIES BY STORM
Berlin, Mar. 8.-The capture of 1,000
yards of trenches from the Russians
northwest of Parnopol was announced
in an official statement from the Aus-
trian war office telegraphed here to-
day. The report says that the Arch-
duke Ferdinand's army drove the en-
emy from their entrenched positions
and occupied them.
MAY MEAN WAR WITh IPORTUGAL
London, Mar. 8.---Unless the Ger-
mhan ships seized by Portugal are re-
leased the Portuguese minister to Ger-
many will receive his passports Sat-
urday noon, says a dispatch to the
Exchange Telegraph company from
Zurich, which gives a report from
Frankfort as ab asis for the statement.
DROP 124 SHELLS ON STATION
Paris, Mar. 8.---Sixteen French aero-
planes dropped 124 shells of all caliber
on the Metz-Sablons station today, the
war office reported. All returned safe-
ly except one, though 20 .machines
attacked the French squadron.
DESE RT NEUTRAL ZONE POSTS
Paris, Mar. 8.-A Havas dispatch
from Athens says the Bulgarians
ceased work they had begun on en-

trenchments in the neutral zonealong
the Graeco-Bulgarian frontier, as a
result of Austrian protests.
?iAISER IDECORATES BTCCA NEER
London, Mar. 8.-Emperor William
has received the commander of the
Gei-man commerce raider Moewe and
personallypresented him with the Or-
der of Pour le Merite, according ton
a Reuter dispatch from Amsterdam.
Ohio State Rceeives $100) for Prizes
Ohio State University has recently
received $1,000 to be offered as prizes
Ior superiority in military drill.

Toronto, Ont., Mar. .--About 20,000
men and women, with a civic water-
wagon, formed a monster parade that,
marend to the house of legislature
this afternoon, and presented a peti-
tion containing 800,000 fignatures re-
questing legislation to make Ontario
dry, at least during the war. When
the parade reached the armory a num-
ber of soldiers pelted snowballs at
the paraders. Several spectators were
injuted later, when the police charged
Iinto the mob.

(. LOWES DICKINSON, ESQ.
Who lectures tonight on "Internation.
ul Reconstruction A fter 1 War."

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