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March 05, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-05

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'['E DAILY
$1.00 A J
NEIVS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS
VOL. XXV. No. 105.
TAKN Y
IFTER HARD FIGHT,
REMNANT OF MEN STILL HOLD
F)RIT AFTER WEE'S
FIGHT
FRENCH HOLD BEST POSITION
Vi achine Gunner Tells of German
Dead on Great Rattle
Field
Paris, Mar. 4.-The situation at Fort
Douaumont is not clear. A remnant
of Brandenburgers low estimated at
between 400 and 500 men, still occupy
the fort having been practically sur-
rounded for a week.
Nevertheless it is believed that they
maintained connection with the Ger-
man advance positions hidden in the
wooded land by underground passages
or behind a ruined trench and that
thereby they were able to get food. It
is stated that the French could cap-
ture the fort if they sacrificed enough
men, but that they think this would not
be justified.
Deterred by the French artillery fire
from making further attacks the Ger-
mans brought up reserves, and began
the attack again Thursday morning.
Twice they reached the barbed wire
entanglements, but were driven back
by the French fire. A third attack of
even greater violence was begun at 3
o'clock in the afternoon. This at-
tack lasted for more than an hour. The
Germans advanced rank after rank
without considering the cost. LI the
face of this attack the French line
held at all but two points, and here
a bayonet counter-attack drove the
Germans back-.
The repulsed assailants took refuge
in the ruins of Hardaumont wood. Tie
village of Douaumont is -now in the
hands of the Germans, but the French
command the heights. In the view of
the French experts, the Germans are in
only temporary possession of the vil-
lage, the French retaining the tech-
nical advantage.
GI'NNEIl TELLS O- SLAUGHTER
Details from this front continue to
come in from men who have talen part
in the action. Writing from the front
n February 27 the operator of a
French machine gun says: "The Ger-
man dead lie in heaps around us. At
times we are obliged to move our ma-
chine gun back twenty or thirty yar1s
as the German dead are piled so high
as to interfere with our fire.
"While it has not been possible to
estimate the German losses in the Ver-
dun drive it appears to be certain
that they have suffered extremely
heavy losses in their attack on the
Douaumont plateau where artillery,
machine gun, and rifle fire has blocked
their attempt.

MCUMBER RESOLUTION
BEFORE SENATE AG9IN
Senator Considering Whether Direct
Vote Should Be Taken, or
1ebate Started
Washington, Mar. 4.-The senate is
again confronted with the issue as to
how it shall deal with the resolution
warning Americans off armed mer-'
chantmen of the belligerents. The
M\cCumber resolution, which was ta-
bled yesterday along with the Gore
resolution, is lying on the table sub-
ject to call.
Senator McCumber is considering
whether he should call the resolution
up early next week and have it voted
down, or whether he should start a
debate on the merits of the subject
matter, and, after the debate has been
exhausted, move for the disposition of
the resolution.
But Senator McCumber objects to
having his warning resolution tabled.
Ie want a direct vote on it. He also
intimatedl that. he may introduce his
resolution which he practically with-
drew yesterday when he substituted
the warlike declaration that the Senate
vred down 68 to 14. -

j
Cy AN

k

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 9$0
TLEGRAPI1 SERVICE BI',
NEW YORK SUN1

ANN AlLB3O , MICHIGA , SIJNIDAY , IAICII 5, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CB

Tivo Noted lMen
To Talk Tonight
Sliailer :Matlhews, and Francis Neilson
Will Deliver Addresses atl
Methodist Chuirch
Dr. Shailer Mathews of Chicago, and
Hon. Francis Neilson of England will
deliver addresses in the Wesleyan
Guild service beginning at 7:30 o'clock
at the Methodist church.
Dr. Shailer Mathews, dean of the di-
vinity school of the University of Chi-
cago, who is recognized throughout the
country as a leader in religious educa-
tion, will discuss "Christianity and In-
ternationalism."
Francis Neilson, member of the Brit-
ish parliament, will speak on "Inter-
nationalism and World Peace." Mr.
Neilson is at present on a lecture tour
of this country and has spoken in
most of the larger cities in the east
and middle west.
The public is cordially invited.
Gaoyle Plans
Leaf Year Issue

{

Campus Wit and humor Abound in
Next Issue of Publication; Out
MTarch 17

MICHIGAN TAKES
BIG TRACKMEET
WITH ONLY 14 MEN COMPETING,
WI)LVERINES STAGE lIUGE
S'IURPIISE IN EAST
SMITH WINS 70 YARD SPRINT'
nmdiriduial Sli nPut Captured by Cross;
Maize and Blue Relay Team
Finishes Third
New York, Mar. 4.--Michigan, with
only 14 men entered in the Madison
Square Garden track meet here this
evening, managed to spring a huge
surprise, when the western school fin-
ished third among the best in thel
east.
H. IL. Smith, captain of the Wolver-
ines, and the intercollegiate championj
in the century dash, captured firstI
place from a fast field in the 70-yard
sprint. 'This boosted Michigan's total
to a point where they finished with an
excellent account of themselves.
Smith's time was 7 2-5 seconds.
Cross, also of the western school,
took first place in the individual shot
put with a hoist of 43 feet 9 1-2 inches.
In the team event in this entry, the
Maize and Blue finished in second posi-
tion with an average for their four
,men of 39 feet and 3-4 inch.
Yale won the 6-lap relay race, with
Cornell second and Michigan third.
Michigan went into the last lap a bad
third, but nearly succeeded in pulling
out in first place, just missing the cov-
eted position by a hair. The time for
this event was 9 minutes, 55 2-5s
seconds, which is exceptionally. fast
for this distance.
Meredith, of Pennsylvania, set the
Quaker town's partisans wild when
he beat out Bingham of Harvard after
the latter had a start of eight yards
in the three-lap race. Overton, the
Yale star distance man, won the final
relay for his team by overcoming a
two-yard handicap.
CL GEORGE BAUN TO
SPEAK AT Y ETING

Sparkling, scintillating, flashing,
glinting, and glancing are only a few
of the adjectives used to describe the
Leap Year number of the Gargoyle,
which is scheduled to make its appear-
ance on the campus on March 17. A
two-color, two-figure cover design by
Alan D. Honey, '17D, is said to em-
body the spirit of the quadrennial
feast of Hymen.
Not the least noteworthy of the
drawings is a double page cartoon by
Harry R. Leach, '16E, which illus-
trates Leap Year as it should be, as
well as Leap Year as it really is. Con-
tributions in the form of stories and
snappy bits of verse by the various
campus wits will greet the eye of the
reader.
Declares Naby 's
State Deplorablel
Former Secretary Believes Invasion
of Our Coast Could not
Be Checked
New York, Mar. 4.- "If war should
be declared tomorrow morning our
navy under Josephus Daniels would
be absolutely impotent to check the
invasion of our coast," declared former
Secretary of the Navy George von L.
Meyer today. "Congress is tlking
war," Meyer contined. "Thanks to Mr.
Daniel's incompetence, war tomorrow
with any one of four European na-
tions would find the way open to the
enemy. The public has not yet re-
alized the deplorable condition of our
navy. Its confidence has not been
fully shak'en, but I say that demor-
alization has already attacked the per-
sonnel because military deficiency has
not been Daniel's goal."
May Need Bigger
Library Budget
Higher Prices on BuildYng .materials
May Call for Additional
Appropriation
Dr. J. F. Shepard, chairman of the
building committee, stated yesterday
that due to the rapid advances in
building materials caused by the war,
the amount appropriated for the new
library will probably be inadequate.
The Regents are considering a
further appropriation and it is also
expected that the west stack, which it
had previously been planned to build
at a later period, will be constructed
at the same time as the new build-
ing.

The first meeting for men interest-
ed in the writing of the 1917 Union
opera will be held at the Union at
2:00 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. At
this meeting instructions will be given
as to what is required and the form
i which it should be written. The
manuscripts must be handed iii about
the last week of May, at which time
the judging conunittee will meet..
it is possible that Director Morgan
vill attend the meeting to offer sugges-
tions. Plans are also being made to
have the book for next year in its
final 1 hape by the beginning of the
fall term, so as to avoid the trouble
encountered in this and previous
years.
Al men trying out for the opera or-
chestra will meet in the School of
Music at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon at
which time the opera music will be
given out. The final list of the men
who will compose the orchestra will
be given out some time Tuesday. Plans
are^ being laid to take from 18 to 20
men on the opera trips.
The ticket sale will be resumed at
the Whitney theater box-office at 19:00
o'clock tomorrow morning.
PREDICTS SUCCESS
Work on All-Nation Revue Pageant
Presents Almost Finished
Appearance
TICKET SALE WILL CONTINUE
With practically all of the scenery
set up and with most of the cast oft
200 in costume, the second dress re-
hearsal of the All-Nation Revue held
last night in Hill auditorium present-
ed an almost finished appearance to
the small audience invited to witness
the performance.
In addition to the students who
have assumed roles in the scene, sev-
eral small children, who represent
toys, Svill take part, and their drills
under the leadership of little Fritz
Burt, son of an Ann Arbor resident,
must prove to be one of the hits of
the production.
Carlos Zanelli '19E, of Chile, has
been cast as the leader in both the
Spanish and Turkish acts and his
songs, suported in each instance by a
chorus of dancing girls, will be one of
the surprises of the show.

* * *1 * * *~ * * * *~ * * *
*
* DR. ANGELL RESTS COM- *
FORTABLY *
*
* At a late hour last night, *
* physicians reported that Presi- *
* dent-Emeritus James B. An- *
* gell was resting comfortably. *
* There are no visible signs that *
* Dr. Angell is improving or that *
* his condition in becoming worse, *
* although those in attendance *~
* have a marked hope for his co- *
* plete recovery from the pres- *
* ent crisis. s
* *
HEATH SERVCE
First Meeting to Be Held in Medical
Building at 7:00 o'Clock To-
morrow Evening
DR. C[MMINGS GIVES ADDRESS
The university health service will
start one of the biggest campaigns in
the history of the university for the
betterment of the health of the stu-
dents at a meeting in the Medical build-
ing, at 7:00 o'clock tomorrow evening.
At this meeting, representatives from
each fraternity and house club will
be present. Dr. Cummings, head of the
health service, will give a talk on hy-
giene.
Although sanitary surveys of every
organization on the campus hae been
done every year, the health guardians
believe that this coming campaign will
make the former unnecessar. Talks
on infection and diseases by thelead-
ing doctors are expected to impress
these matters upon the students.
In order to reach the whole male
student body, large boarding houses
are asked to select a representative
also. The meetings will be open to
the public and all those interested are
cordially invited to attend.
A similar campaign among the wom-
en will be conducted in the future.
NINE FAIL ON EXAMINATION
FOR RE) CROSS CERTIFICATES
Of the 30 students who took the ex-
amination for certificates of the Amer-
ican Red Cross society in the first
aid, the latter part of January, nine
failed.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Warmer with moderate winds.
TODAY
2:30 o'clock-Meeting of all district
chairmen of Busrah campaign, New-
berry hall.
4:00 oclock-Students' orchestra
meets, School of Music.
6:30 o'clock - Col. Geo. W. Bain
speaks, "Y" Arcade meeting.
7:30 o'clock-Shailer Matthews and
Francis Nielson speak, Methodist
church.
8:00 o'clock-Menorah Society, New-
berry hall.
TOMORROW
7:15 o'clock-Student social service
organization meets, Methodist church.
7:30 o'clock-Prof. Simonds lectures
before Michigan Dames, Newberry
hall.
7:00 o'clock-Meeting of representa
tives of fraternities and house clubs

in medical building.

To Hold Meeting
for Opera Writers
PLan to tinit Book for 1917 Union
Production Completed by
: (all
TRACK ,SC.HEDULE FOR CINDER M

I - ___ - - - -- - _._ - s ail

PENNSY NINE WILL NOT BE A
TRACTION OF UOMMEN1CEENM
EXERCISES
PLAN ANNUAL ALUMNI SA
Michigan Teams to Enter Big Me
in East;. Stage Important
Contests at Home
Comprising 25 games for which co
tracts have already been signed, Mic
gan's 1916 baseball schedule was ra
fled yesterday by the Board in Co
trol of Athletics.
The ball-tossers will make their ii
appearance, against outside compe
tion when they start on the southe:
trip during spring vacation, at 1;hl
time meeting Kentucky, Georgia, Ml
cer. Vanderbilt, and winding up wi
Notre Dame. Olivet, Kalamazoo 0
lege, Case, Syracuse, Kalamazoo N(
mal and Cornell quickly follow on
home lot, when the team leavesf
the eastern trip, to cross bats -wl
Syracuse, Cornell, Swathmore, a
Pennsylvania. The Aggies are e
countered in Lansing on May 27, a
again in Ann Arbor on June 9 and
Notre Dame appears in Ann Arbor
June 2 and 3, at the time of t.e I
terscholastic meet.
Owing to the lateness of Commeo
n-rentd ay, Pennsylvania will not be t
attraction of the commencement ex
cises that she has for a number
years past. It is quite possible th
an alumni team made up of some
Michigan's big-league stars, will
formed to meet the Wolverines in te
final game.
Varsity Baseball Schedule, 1916
April 8-University of Kentuei
Lexington, Ky.
April 10-University of Georg
Athens, Ga.
April 11-University of Georg
Athens, Ga.
April 12-Mercer University, Macc
Ga.
April .13-Mercer University, Macc
Ga.
April 14-Vanderbilt Universi
Nashville, Tenn.
April15-Vanderbilt Universi
Nashville, Tenn.
April 17-Notre Dame University,
Notre Dame, Ind.
April 20-Olivet College at A
Arbor.
April 22-Opens
April 26-Kalamazoo College, A
Arbor.
April 29-Case Scientific Scho
Ann Arbor.
May 4-Syracuse University, A
Arbor.
May 6-Syracuse University, A
Arbor.
May 10-Kalamazoo Normal Collej
Ann Arbor.
May 13-Cornell University, A
Arbor.
May 15-Syracuse University,;
racuse, N. Y.
May16-Syracuse University,
racuse, N. Y.
May 17-Cornell University, Itha
N. Y.
May 18-Open.
May 19 - Swathmore Universi
Swathmore, Pa.
May 20-University of Pennsylvan
Philadelphia, Pa. -
May 27-Michigan Agricultural C
lege, East Lansing, Mich.
June 2-Notre Dame University, A
Arbor.
June 3-Notre Dame Universiy, A
Arbor.
June 9-Michigan Agricultural C
lege, Ann Arbor.
June 10-Michigan Agricultural C

lege, Ann Arbor.
Commencement Day game-Alut
team if large college game is
available.
Track Competition for 1916
with no Varsity indoor meets 1-
ed for Ann Arbor, but displaying
formidable array of competition
both indoor and outdoor meets,
track schedule for 1916 will k
Captain Smith's cinder artists: ke
up to the highest point of efiicien
to which "Steve" Farrell's cdach
can elevate them.
Intercollegiate competition of f
(Continued on, Page Six)

Kentucky Orator 1lill Hae4 "If
C 1ould Live Life O(er> for His
NSibjieef at Are ad a Toight

I

Col. George W. Uain, the Kentucky

orator, will speak in the "Y" meeting Mrs. Flora Westermann Lowry, who
at the Arcade Theater this evening Will take the feminine lead in the
at 6:30 o'clock. Iris subj"ct will be American Indian scene, also depicts
"If I Could Live Life Over." in -In unusually lifelike way the spirit
Col. Baia has for many years been of the old Indian tribes of hundreds
one of the most popular lecturers in of years ago, and the spirit dance in
the .United States. A short time ago this act, the effect of which is height
one of his contemporaries said, "Col. ened by special lighting effects will
Bain bas done more good than any make it one of the most siriking acts
other man on the American platform." of the entire production.
Movies will be shown at the theater Tickets will be on sale all day tomor-
before the meeting beginning at 6:10 row at the box office in Hill auditori-
o'clocl. um, and according to the director of
sales, there are still many good seats
millY FORM SITDENT BREAU left for both nights. It is expected
FOR EXCHAN'GE OF ,OL1TR1N that a large number of prominent De-
troiters and residents of other Michi-
gan cities will attend the first per-
Mrs. Maria Peel, city visitor for the formance which is scheduled for Tues-
Ann Arbor Federation of Charities, day night.
has conceived the idea of a students'
exchange for clothing, which she be- German Submarines Show Activity
lieves would prove of much value to Berlin, via wireless, Mar. 4.-Two
those having apparel to sell and to French auxiliary cruisers and one Eng-
those desiring to buy. Mrs. Peel con- lish patrol boat have been sunk by
siders the present method of dispos- German submarines, the admiralty an-
ing of clothing to men who make a nounces today. The admiralty state-
business of such purchasing and resell- ment did not identify the French
ing, to be wrong. cruisers.
It is her plan to conduct the ex- Athens, Mar. 4.-The Italian steamer
chang in the university Y. M. C. A. Java has been torpedoed by a subma-
or some other building. The method of rine. The passengers and crew were
disposal of these articles will be an- rescued bye a British boat after being
nounced at a later date. adrift in small boats for 24 hours.

W ES LEYAN G UILD LECTURE S
SHAILER MATHEWS FRANCIS NEILSON
Dean of the Divinity School of the University of Chicago Playwright, Author and Member of Parliament
"Christianity and InternationalismI" nternationalism and World Peace "
TONIGHT T TONICHT
7:30 5T7:30

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