100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

Tby

Mich igan

Daty

Phones :-Editorial 2414
-Businiess 960
TELEGRA plH SEB-ICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

., f

P z

Vol. XXVI. No. 10.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

IP-7

'AV

MilE. COOLEY TALKS'
AT CONVOCATION
OF STUDENT6BODY;
B1tE VITY WILL FEATURE THIR D
GENERAL STUDENT AS-
SEMBLAGE
PRESIDENT SLATED TO PRE'SIDE

G. HIPUTNAM, FAMOUS
VETERNDOWHITER,
rGOM ING TO ANN ARORD
publisher and Writr Spenks Net
"p ner Historical Asso-
eaion Auspees
"PUBLIC AMBABSSAlDOR" HAS
AIDED ANGLO-AMERICAN PEACE

- __ _-

I I i

'ARIOUS CLASSES
NOMINATE MEN
FO 1956JOBS'

ARREST OF THREE
STUDENTS RESULT
OF MAJESTIC RUSH
V. B. WORTH, '14E, H. F. SHANK '18.
ANT) C. M. CAROIJTHERS, '18,
ARRAIGNE)

SENIOR LITERARY STUDENTS
SELECT NAMES FOR BAL-
LOT TODAY

TO

Earl Moore Will Play Unison
Hig Booked; Rain Cannot
Prevent

LECTURER DISCUSSES AFFAIRS
WITH LORD KITCH-
ENER

STUDENT COUNCiLMEN MANAGE I TRIAL OCCURS THIS MORNING

Sing-.I

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* Ceouo.tion Exercises *
* *
* When-3:00 o'clock this aft- *
ernoon.
* Speakers--Dean Cooley and *
* President Hutchins. *
* Features--Musical program, *
* with unison singing by the stu- *
* dents. *
* Weather Report-Fair. *
* President Hutchins expects *
* every student in the university *
* to attend. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"Some Homely Ideals of Education"
has been chosen as the subject.of the
address which will be given by Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley, of the college of
engineering, before the third convoca-
tion assemblage in the Hill auditorium
at 3:00 o'clock this afternoon.
Dispensing with the usual lengthy
exercises of past years, Michigan's
annual convocation in Hill auditorium
is scheduled to take less than an
hour's time. Unison singing is. to be
a feature of the program, and Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins yesterday
made a requet that the student body
and faculty join in heartily.
Every student in the university will
be enabled to attend the exercises, as
all classe~s will be dismissed at 3:00
o'clock. Immediately afterward the
Sasses will form, according to years,
before marching in a body into the big
hall.
Dean Cooley's address will not last
more than 30 minutes, and the only
other speaker on the program will be
President Hutchins, whose talk will
probably be confined mostly to a few
words of welcome to the first year
students.
Two musical numbers will be of-
fered by Earl Moore, '12, on the organ,
while the unison singing of "Ann Ar-
bor, 'Tie of Thee" and "The Yellow
and Blue" will comprise the vocal
program.
Student marshals for the various
classes have been appointed as fol-
lows: Graduate school, R. W. Clark,
L. E. Crossman. Senior class mar-'
shals: J. B. Angell, literary; A. H..
Keeler, engineering; A. V. Moninger,
architecture; J. O. Dieterle, medical;
E. R. McCal}, law; R. F. Smith, phar-
macy; H. C. Allen, homeopathic; F. G.
Dratz, dental. Junior class marshals:
E. R. Sylvester, literary; E. J. Hunt-'
ington, engineering; G. A. Bellows,E
architecture; George M. McClure,
medical; E. B. Houseman, law; George'
R. Linzel, pharmacy; H. F. Closz, ho-
meopathic; R. H. Burkhardt, dental.'
Sophom:. e class marshals: W. Lloyd
Kemp, lierary; C. Swartfiguer, engi-
neering; C. W. Atwood, architecture;
E. L. Hammond, pharmacy; E. D.
Crumpacher, law; C. C. Hyde, medical;_
Edward Stebbins, homeopathic. Fresh-
man class marshals: Stephen Clark,
literary; S. C. Smith, engineering; D.
P. Wood, engineering; M. L. Smith,
architecture; Robert Novy, medical;
W. E. Kirchgessner, pharmacy; J. D.
Van Schoick, homeopathic; F. B. Ved-
der, dental.
Formation
The members of the several facul-
ties assemble in University hall, don
robes, and form in column of twos in
main corridor, facing front entrance.Y
Graduate ,school students assemble
in single column on opposite sides of
the main walk in front of University
hall. The students of this department
should stand sufficiently apart to oc-
cupy the entire length of walk on both1
sides, and face the walk.1
Students who have received a de-
gree other than those registered in theY
Graduate school, and senior and ju-
nior medical students, not holding de-

grees, shall assemble with 1916 class
group.1
1916 students of all departments, in-1
(Continued on Page Six) I

The Honorable George Haven Put-
nam, famous publisher, writer and
Civil War veteran, will speak under
the auspices of the University Histor-
ical association on Thursday, October
21, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Mr.
Putnam is the best known of all Amer-
ican publishers, having earned this
recognition by his constant writing
and leadership in important cultural
movements in this and other coun-
tries.
It has been said that Mr. Putnam
has done. more to strengthen the re-
lations between England and America
than any other living man, and he is
often called the ambassador of the
American public to England. His
close associations with the publishers
of England have brought him in touch
with the world of English letters. He
has discussed problems with Lord
Kitchener and is an intimate friend of
the Honorable George Trevelyan, the
noted historian, who delivered a lec-
ture in Ann Arbor last year.
As an author, he is constantly at
work, and his recent book on the
"Memories of a Publisher" illustrates
his keen appreciation of the accom-
plishments of others. In addition to
this, his volume on the "Memories of
My Youth" is rated as one of the best
f nmdern productions.
SOPKS AND YEARINS
HOLD ROUSING MEETS
ON EVE OF FAll RUSH
'R1am or Shine" Slogan of Under-
classmen Preparing for Ferry
Field Battle
McIN NEY "HAL" SMITH, MACK
AND) SODDY TALK TO 118 MEN
FRESH GATHER FOR ADDITIONAL
"PEP" FEST AT "MAJ"
YESTERDAY
Rain, snow or shine, the sopho-
mores and freshmen will meet for the
annual fall underclass contests at 9:30
o'clock on south Ferry field tomorrow
morning. Last year the class of 1918
was defeated by the score of 4-0 in
the fall games, and they are deter-
mined to come back with a decisive
victory over the 1919 class this year.
Ward Peterson, '19, has been appoint-
ed to direct the freshmen forces
against the sophomore onslaught, and
Archie Walls, '18, will captain the sec-
ond year delegation.
Harold Smith, '16, has been appoint-
ed referee of the contests, and george
V. Labadie, lit. spec., and L. H. Ben-
ton, 16E, will be the judges. All fresh-
men and sophomores will be excused
from classes on Saturday morning.
Members of the sophomore class
turned out for their mass meeting last
night 900 strong. They were ad-
dressed by Francis F. McKinney, '16L,
who presided at the meeting; Harold
Smith, '16; Francis T. Mack, '16E, and
T. P. Soddy, '16E.
Not content with the one mass
meeting provided for them by the stu-
dent council, the freshmen class held
a second meeting at the Majestic the-
ater yesterday afternoon. More than
700 yearlings turned out to display
more fighting spirit in preparation for
the contest Saturday morning.
Searchlights for Football Practice
Champaign, Ill., Oct. 14.-Four new
electric searchlights will guide the
Illinois eleven in their night practice.
It has always been the custom at
Champaign to have night "through thec
mill" work.t

Manages Powder Laboratory
C. E. Kennedy, '15, has been ap-
pointed manager of a new laboratoryI
,ecently put up by the Aetna Powder
corpany of Oakdale, Pa.

Initial Year Laws Make Preliminary
Choices; Other Classes About
to Do Same
Class nominations and elections are
being held in all colleges and schools
this week and next, with student
councilmen in charge of the balloting.
Nominations for officers in the se-
nior lit class will be made at the
meeting to be held this afternoon at
3:00 o'clock in the large lecture room
in Tappan hall.
Instead of the blank ballot system
which has always been used in the
past, nominations will be verbal, no
nominating speeches of any kind be
ing allowed. After the pre-nomina-
tions have all been made, a ballot will
be taken, and the two men who have
received the largest number of the
votes cast will be declared nominated
and their names will be placed on the
official ballot.
First year laws met yesterday aft-
ernoon and selected nominees to be
voted on next Monday afternoon.
The following men were nominated:
President, James M. Barrett and W.
E. Mathews; vice-president, W. W.
Jenkins and L. H. Smith; secretary,
E. D. Patrick and David I. Hubar;
treasurer, James Thomas and R. J.
Hall; oratorical delegates, Glen Coul-
ter and J. E. Ryan; football manager,
E. M. Johnstone and Gerald Hagar;
baseball manager, Felix S. Baer;
track manager, F. R. Snyder and
George F. Hurley; basketball man-
ager, C. L. Strauss and A. F. Paley.
Senior dents have nominated the
following men: President, A. J. Mc-
Clellan, W. K. Meade; vice-president,
L. H. Bourquoin, C. Cole; secretary,
B. L. Grojewski, A. J. Lowther; treas-
urer, C. M. Rice, E. A. Ross; athletic
manager, J. H. Barringer, N. L. Spen-
cer.
Junior lits will nominate for class
officers at 4:00 o'clock today in room
1If economics building, while the se-
nior architects meet for the same pur-
pose at 5:15 o'clock today in room 311,
new engineering building.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* Rules and Regulations for *
Fresh-Soph Games *
* 1. Freshmen meet at flag-pole, *
* 8:30 o'clock; sophomores meet *
* in front of Tappan hall, 8:30 *
* o'clock. *
* 2. Freshmen defend the three *
* poles; sophomores attack. *
* 3. Sophomores advance to two *
* end poles in two equal columns *
* from opposite sides. *
* 4. Duration of rush, 30 min- *
* utes. *
* 5. Flags must be surrendered *
* to referee immediately. *
* 6. All contestants must wear *
* tennis shoes. *
* 7. Use of any instruments or *
* grease is forbidden. *
* 8. Posting of proclamations is *
* forbidden. *
, 9. Each class chooses 30 men *
* for cane spree. *
* 10. One point awarded to class *
* winning majority of canes; one *
* point for each end pole; two *
* points for center pole. *
Time-9:30 o'clock. *
* Place-Ferry field. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

Glass Doors of Main Entrtnce
Large Window Smashed by
Crowd

and

In a sophomore class rush on the
Majestic theater last night just be-
fore the second show, Clarence B.
Worth, '14E, C. M. Carouthers, '18,
and Harold F. Shank, '18, were ar-
rested by the police and arraigned on
a charge of disorderly conduct. The
men were later released on bail of
$50 each, and were remanded for ex-
amination at the police court at 9:30
o'clock this morning.
About 200 men were in the crowd
which gathered about the theater be-
fore the close of the first perform-
ance, and when Manager Frank J.
O'Donnell of the Majestic refused to
grant the men a free show they im-
mediately rushed the theater. A num-
her of policemen and several rein-
forcements from the sheriff's office
endeavored to quiet the crowd, and in
the melee which ensued Worth, who
is an employee of a Detroit automo-
bile firm, and who held a ticket for
the second performance, was appre-
hended by the police for attempting
to force his way in.
This so incensed the crowd that,
despite the efforts of W. A. P. John,'16,
who endeavored to disperse the as-
semblage, the glass doors of the main
entrance were smashed and one of
the l= '~Y v ;dows and a large are
light in the front of the building were
broken.
The damage is estimated at $25.
According to T. P. Soddy, '16E, pres-
ident of the student council, a special
meeting of that body will be called
for this evening at 7:15 o'clock in
the north wing of University hall for
the purpose of investigating the riot
and to take measures for the punish-
ment of the participants.
PLAN RECEPTION AND SMOKER
TO NEW MEN FROM COLORADO
At a meeting of the Colorado club
to be held Tuesday evening at 7:45
o'clock at the Michigan Union, a re-
ception will be held for the welcom-
ing of the new men from Colorado.
There will also be a smoker and an
informal program. All Colorado men
and any men who have attended an
institution of higher learning in Colo-
rado are eligible for membership, and
are invited at attend the gathering.
ALPHA NU SOCIETY PICKS NEW
MEN TO FILL PLACES VACATED
Alpha Nu literary society held an
election Wednesday evening to fill va-
cancies left by men who have not re-
turned to the university this fall. H.
H. Springston, '17, was elected orator-
ical delegate, and Herman Chapman,
'17, was elected treasurer.
City "Y" Classes Get Bill Enrollment
Gymnasium classes at the city Y.
M. C. A. are being well attended dur-
ing the past few days. Social activi-
ties of a more varied.,nature are under
consideration. A glee and mandolin
club under the direction of R. T.
Swezey and W. E. Binkley, and an or-
chestra under the supervision of Ray-
mond Kefferstein will start soon.
Hours of Advisory Committee
The advisory committee for first
year students will hold office hours as
scheduled below in the outer room ofI
Dean Effinger's office Monday and
Thursday afternoons, from 4:00 to
5:00 o'clock, October 18 and 21. Stu-
dents desiring to consult this commit-
tee are cordially invited to do so.
The members of the c nmittee who
will be in attendance are:
Monday, Oct. 18.-Professors O. C.
Glaser (zoology), L. C. Karpinski
(mathematics), Mr. K. A. McLaughlin
(French), and Mr. R. W. Cowden
(rhetoric).
Thursday, Oct. 21.-Professors C. B.

Vibbert (philosophy), S. F. Gingerich
(English), I. D. Scott (geology), and
C. 0. Davis (education).

CARLES ORE TLKS
ON NTUIN MICHIGN'S HISTORY
tar,,est Adieice of Convention Hears
Comprehensive Survey of Big
Men of State
PROFESSORS HEN l)ERSON, RIGGS,
RUTIVEN AND REEVES SPEAK
UNIVERSITY'S RELATIONS WITH,
THE STATE O', TY' BILL
TO AY
Charles Moore, one of the most emi-
nent historical authorities in this
state, and secretary of the State His-
torical commission, spoke interestingly
and thoughtfully before the Michigan
Library association in Memorial hall
last evening on the subject, "Michigan
Worthies Worth Knowing." Probably
the largest audience of the conven-
tion greeted Mr. Moore.
The speaker made a rapid but in-
tensive survey of the worthies of'
Michigan history, beginning in the
distant past with the dim figures of
men like Father Marquette and car-
rying the study up through the lists
of famous citizens of the state to the
latest times.
The first half hour of this morning's
conference at 9:00 o'clock will be de-
voted to a business session at which.
the main topic of discussion will be
the question of the relation of the uni-
versity to the, state. At 9:30 o'clock
Mr. M. W. Bishop, university librarian,
will preside at the final meeting of
the conference, in which the exten-
sion work of the university will re-

ceive special consideration.
Prof. W. D. Henderson will deliver
an address on the subject of "The
University Extension Service." Dr. F.
G. Novy will speak on "The College
of Medicine," and Prof. J. S. Reeves
will tell of the work being accom-
plished by the bureau of municipal re-
search. The "College of Engineering"
will be the topic taken by Prof. H. E.
Riggs, and Prof. A. G. Ruthven will
speak on "The Museum."
Those delegates who are able to re-
main over for this afternoon will be
guests of the Civic association in a
special automobile tour of the city.
The cars will leave Alumni Memorial
hall at 2:00 o'clock and will return
in time for the university convocation
parade.
Dr. Nearing Given New Berth
Toledo, Oct. 14.-Dr. Scott Nearing
will assume the chair of dean of the
college of literature and the arts at
Toledo university, according to an an-
nouncement made public here today.
He comes from the -University of
Pennsylvania, from which place he
was recently dismissed with consid-
erable public sensation. It is said
that he was ousted because of the
vehement criticism of several large
corporations with regard to several
of his recent public utterances.

Z EPEIN

fl)rE A TOLL GROWS

DV MBARHOMEWARD
BOUND, PREDiCTS
EX-A ASSA IAOR 1 OU CES MU-
ALLIES

Russian Emperor On Way to Front;
Martial Law Declared in
Netherlands
London, oct. 14.-"The Germans and
Austrians will surely declare war on
the United States if they do not stop
sending munitions to the allies," was
the statement of Dr. Constantin Dum-
ba, former Austrian ambassador to the
United States, who is a passenger on
the steamer "New Amsterdam."
The ambassador in giving the state-
ment to the press showed no reserve
in his denunciation of the neutrality
policy which is being followed by the
United States. *
The Hague, Oct. 14.-Partial mar-
tial law was declared here today In
order to facilitate the distribution of
army supplies to the army of The
Netherlands. According to prominent
government officials, hovever, the or-
der is purely local in character and
does not imply the leaning of the
Dutch government toward any of the
belligerent nations.
Petrograd, Oct. 14.-The Russian
emperor is on his way to the front
and will assume nominal control of
the Russian army. He is acompnled
by the Crown Prince Alexis.
London, Oct. 14.-TPhe British capi-
tal was aghast today when it learned
that in addition to the 41 casualtIes
reported yesterday in the latest Zep-
pelin raid, investigation had proven
that 14 other civilians had met death
from the German air machine. The
later reports also place the list of
wounded at 114, 13 more than it was
at first believed had been injured by
the falling bombs.
At a mass meeting today precau-
tions for the safeguarding of the pop-
ulace were discussed, and bitter de-
nunciation of the government's delay
in providing better defenses against
aerial attacks was hotly discused.
This raid brings the total casualties
by German air raids to 177 killed and
463 wounded.
London, Oct. 14.-The foreign office
today made public a statement that
the sole object of the British interest
in the Balkans was to intercept the
German raids which have been oc-
curring so frequently of late on Con-
stantinople.
President Leases Long Branch Ilome
Washington, Oct. 14.--In a state-
ment made public here today it was
announced that the summer home of
President Wilson has been moved
from Cornish, N. H., to Long Branch,
a place not far distant. The president
has leased a residence at that place,
and will make his summer headquar-
ters there from now on.
Lay Keel of Greatest Dreadnought
New York, Oct. 15.-The keel of the
greatest of dreadnoughts, the Califor-
nia, was laid at the Brooklyn navy
yard today, when Secretary of the
Navy Daniels pronounced the benedic-
tion at the close 'of the ceremony.
JOHN HAS ATTACHMENT TO ANN
ABOR, SO "IKE" GOES TO JAIL
"Ike" Cox was arraigned before
Justice of the Peace John D. Thomas
yesterday afternoon on the charge of
having appropriated $5.00 belonging
to his employer, Mr. C. S. Schnieder.
He pleaded guilty and was assessed a
fine and costs which amounted to
$16.05, or serve 30 days in jail. He
was unable to produce the fine and
was committed 'to jail.
Mr. Schneider told the court that he

was willing to pay the fine and costs
as well as reinstate the prisoner in
his employ on the condition that the
prisoner's ^brother, John Cox would
leave the city at once. John refused
to somply with Schnieder's request
and his brother, is still Ianguishing in
the county bastile.

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

TODAY
Meeting of the Regents, 10:00 o'clock.
Convocation for 1915, Hill auditorium,
3:00 o'clock.
Engineers of class of 1915 smoker,
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Freshman night, Newberry hall, 6:00
o'clock.
Glee club tryouts, School of Music,
7:00 o'clock.
Tickets for Warthin Sex lectures, Y.
M. C. A., 2:00-6:00 o'clock.
Senior medics' nominations, hospital
amphitheater, 12:00 o'clock.
Senior architects, 311 new engineer-
ing building, 5:15 o'clock.
Senior lit., Tappan hall, 3:00 o'clock.
Junior lit., 101 economics building,
4:00 o'clock.
Junior medics, west amphitheater,
11:00 o'clock..
Soph. homeops., lecture room A, ho-
meopathic hospital, 11:15 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Tickets for Warthin Sex lectures, "Y,"
10:00-12:00 o'clock.
Fresh-soph flag rush, 10:00 o'clock,
Ferry field.
All-Fresh vs. Michigan State Normal
school, 1:30 o'clock.
Michigan vs. Case School of Applied
Science, 2:30 o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, 9:00 o'clock.

Insurance Companies Run Risk on
Loan
Albany, N. Y., Oct. 14.-Representa-
tives of state insurance companies
were told by the state authorities to-
day that they would have to rely on
their own judgment, in connection
with investmentin the new war loan
to the allies. Insurance Commission-
er Phillips notified them that they
may invest if they care to, but he said
that he would take no responsibility
In the matter.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan