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March 03, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-03

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THlE DAILY
$10
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGHAPH SERVICE BY T
NEW YORK SUN

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VOL. XXVI. No. 103.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

PORTUGAL VEING
ON WARFA RE WITH
GERMANIC POWER
OFFENSIVE AGAINST V FRDUN
APPEA RS TO hAVE SLACKEN-
ED IN FORCE
TEUTONS TAKE ANOTHER FOR T
French Artillery auses Heavy Losses
Around I)ouaunioint; Germans
Suffer in Southwest
Lisbon, Mar. 2.-Germany will
declare war on Portugal at once
unless a sat acditory note is sent
on German ships recently seized
by PorTugal, Two hundred lead-
ing members of th German colony
have left for Spain, as a result of
reports anticipating war. The ma-
jority of German business houses
1,'v b( i closed.
GERMANS' ASSAULT FUTILE
London, Mar. 2 -The German at-
tack on Verdun, in which there has
been a lull for two days, was resumed
last night with a lively but futile as-
sault against Fresnes on the Woevre
plain, and today the Germans returned
to their drive against the fortress from
the north. Neither the driving power
nor the wide scope of last week were
manifested in the renewal of opera-
tions and the German efforts to make
further headway were without success
except the reported German capture of
the Fort de Vaux.
A new center of activity in this re-
,len has developed to the west of the
(0Cn1tinled on Page Six)
MAY H0AVEOVER0FLOw:
DANC ESAT PACKARD
C .ncil to Investigate :lding Unio
Affairs at Academy; Proceeds
to Go to Charity
CAP MI( HT COES ON JUNE 2
Plans for holding a weekly dance at
the Packard academy to care for the
students who are unable to secure
tickets for Union affairs, will be in-

-;-

Local Nan Will
7(eturn to France
Liis 1..Hall, Jr.,.to -ake Up War
Douties at Paris Upon Arrival
in~Europe
Louis P. Hall., Jr., expects to re-
turn to France about the middle of
the month. He will go directly to
Paris and make his headquarters
there, not returning to the Vosges
mountains where his ambulance was
formerly stationed. The "Dick Hall"
ambulance, which was given in mem-
ory of his brother, has already been
shipped and will be ready upon his
arrival.j
MICIGAN MEN TO
RECEIVE PRACTICAL
BARINGTRAINING
NATIONAL CITY BANK AND SIX
WESTERN UNIVERSITIES
GRANT FELLOWSHIPS
PLAN WINS WIDE APPROVAL
Delegates at Chicago Heartily Support
Project; Will Select Six
Students
If present plans materialize, a num-
ber of Michigan men will receive prac-
tical experience in banking before an-
other year has passed.
In order to get things started im-
mediately six men will be selected be-
fore April 1, by the faculty of the
economics department. Three of
of the students are to be sophomores
and three are to be seniors. Person-
ality, scholarship, and general fitness.
for this service will be considered as
the basis for these selections.
At the conference held at Chicago
on Wednesday with the representa-
tive of- the National City Bank of New
York and delegates from six of the
largest western institutions of learn-1
ing, plans were discussed by which
fellowships could be granted to cer-
tain students in connection with the
above named bank which is the larg-
est in the county.
l) Effinger and Dowrie Attend
Dean John R. Effinger and Prof.
Geo. W. Dowrie, Michigan's repre-
-lt tivc at Mnrntisc in Chir~o

COMPLETECAgSTOF Life Membership
List Is Increasi
Ovcr E20E EAdditiomml Names Added
15 NES NUnion o ti
150NAES N IST Last Effort

ed
d to)

H ARG ES AGAINS ICHIEF EXECUTIVE
WILSON CLAIMS MISINTERPRETATlO

LEADING
AND

CAMPUS ENTERTAINERS
OTHER ARTISTS ON
PROGRAM

REIMANN IN CENTRAL ROLE
Whole Theme Is Built Around Him;
Box Office Open at Noon
and Supper Hours
The complete cast of the All Nation
Revue was given out for the first time
last night. It contains 150 names, in-
cludiag leading campus entertainers,
in addition to several artists of repu-
tation from outside the university.
Louis Reimann, as Humanity, plays
the central role of the production, and
the whole theme is built up around
him. His handmaidens, Love, Friend-
ship, Honor, Youth, Beauty, Knowl-
edge, Progress, Labor, Humor, aind
Hope, are played by the Misses Fletch-
er, Domboorajian, McBride, Seelye,
Cowley, Sargent, Povah, Durfee, Coo-'
ley and Wuerfel.
Albert Seelye is the leader of the
Zulu band which encounters its rival
tribe in the African scene. Seelye
speaks Zulu fluently, the entire act
being conducted in this strange
tongue. He will be assisted by Hill-
iard W. Goldstick, John 'Robertson,
Robert Melcher, Adrian von Serfon-
tein, Walter Kluge, Henry Marais, Ber-
tram Ingle, Robert Bird, Carl Mosig,
Albert Eckstein, M. Baumann, Lennox
Schmidt, Clifton Maree, Orton Good-
sell, and William Mason. -
Nine Native Chinese Appear
Nine bona fide Chinese students will
take the leading roles in the act de-
picting this- awakening nation of the,
orient. They are Q. L. Young, H. G.
King, Ho Lee, S. J. Hung, H. K. Kue,
D. Y. Wong, P. Lim, Q. Quan, and
Q. Wing. They will be assisted by a
chorus of American dancers, including
Blanche Gordon, Laura Sauer, Betty
Howard, Selma Lindell, Helen Travis,
and Helen Knowlson.
Albertina Rasch, the world famous
danseuse from the Paris and Vienna
Opera companies, will appear first in
the Egyptian act, in which she will
execute the difficult Dance of the Sca-
rab among several solos peculiar to}
the land of the Nile.1

Incomplete returns from the final
night of canvassing in the Union life
membership campaign show an addi-
tion of over 200 names to the mem-
bership list. This means at the very
least a gain of 25 or 30 over the pre-
ceding nights. Altogether the entire
campaign has raised the total number
to 2,000.
Because of ,the number of names
still being sent in by solicitors, the
winners of the awa rd, to be given
the high individual man and the
chairman of the highest scoring com-
inittee cannot be anounced until late
Friday night or Saturday morning.
At a late hour last night, E. C. Wunsch
'is, was leading the individual list with
33 memberships, while the committee
under Robert W. Collins, '17E, leads
the combination list with a total of
88. Joe Meade's committee is next
pith 84.
DEBATER SCO NTEST
FOR HONOR TONIGHT
Five ;ien to Compete In Preliminary
to Northern League Contest
t4) Be held In May
CASH AWARDS FOR FIRST PLACES
The first chapter of one of the big-
gest oratorical league contests in
America will be completed tonight,
when five Michigan speakers will crn-
test for the honor of representing the
university in the Northern league con-
test at University of Illinois in May.
The speakers and their subjects are as
follows:
C. P. Anderson, "God and Mammon."
A. R. Levine, "Christianity's Protest."
V. H. Sugar, "Poisoned Wells of Wis-
dom." N. E. Pinney, "The Supernatu-
ral Mind." R. M. Carson, "Governors
of the World."
The contest will be held in Univer-
sity hall at 8:00 o'clock. All students
are admitted free, as at the Northwest-
ern debate, upon presentation of regu-
lar Oratorical Association tickets. Ad-
mission to others is 25 cents.
Regent Leland, of Detroit, will pre-
side, and prominent faculty members
will act as judges. The men gaining
first and second places tonight will win
the Nathan M. Kaufman prizes of $100
and $50 respectively, and in addition
to this, the winner will receive the
Chicago Alumni medal. -
Daily Corrects Error in Balloting
Through an error in the totalling of
the votes cast in Wednesday's election
for university student officers, R. W.
Harbert, one of the candidates for
the office of assistant football manager,
was given but 158 votes in yesterday's
Daily. Harbert's poll should have
read 338.
To Name Three Members to Aid "Y"
Three members t? assist the "Y"
cabinet in selecting the officers for the
next year will be chosen at a business
meeting in connection with the Arcade
meeting of theY .M C. A. Sunday
night.
Pool Is forbidden
to ilinor Students
Chief of Police Pardon Begins Enforce-
ment of State Law by Arresting
Charles Kokales
Billiard playing as a diversion for
the greater part of the freshman class
is ended. The average age of this

year's "frosh" is 19 years. In accord-
ance with the law which states that
students in any public educational in-,
stitution who are under age are pro-
hibited from frequenting billiard halls,
Chief of Police Pardon stated yesterday
that all owners of such halls allowing
minors to frequent their premises will
be legally prosecuted.
Following this edict, Charles Ko-
kales, who owns a billiard hall on
South State street, was arrested yes-
terday on a warrant sworn out by
Roger Manwarning and was fined $25
and costs amounting to $3.45. .i

*:
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*:
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* * * * * *.* * * * *

*

An aeroplane,
postal authorities

sent by the
of Detroit from

that city to Chicago, passed over
State street at 8:37 o'clock last
night. Its passage was detected
by a large searchlight on the
front of the plane.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
,

GORE STATES THAT PRESID
DEFEN D8) PARTICIPATION
IN WAR
HEATED ARGUMENT IN SEN

ENGLUND ABUT TO CALL
MARRIED MEN TO COLORS
Lloyd George Announces Such a Step
in Near Future; Parliament
Talks Conscription
London, Mar. 2.-The conscription
question was the main topic of discus-
sion in both houses of parliament to-
day. In the house of commons, Lloyd
George, minister of munitions, an-
nounced that the government will
shortly issue a statement calling mar-
ried men to the colors.
The house of lords was told by Min-
ister of Recruiting, Lord Derby, that
4,500 married men attested yesterday.
A significant remark made by. Lordl
Derby in the course of the conscrip-
tion question was that he did not in-
tend to leave the war office "as long as
Lord Kitchener wishes me to stay."
There has been a strong tendency of
late toward the opinion that Lord
Derby and the war secretary were not
the best of friends. Among the rea-
sons given being that Lord Derby had
been gradually given much of Lord
Kitchener's original power, and has
brown to be looked upon in the light
of a rival of the war secretary.
Each of the many recent reports of
Lord Kitchener's impending resigna-
tion mentioned Lord Derby as his pos-
sible successor.
200 ATTEND FIRST MEETTING

Big Turnout at Initial
Upper Peninsula

Session
Club

of

vestigated
dent Cou
the regul
last night
Profits
devoted
jects as th
bers of th
dances, '
rection of
Hart, '17,
Rindge, 'l
to conside
Cap Ni
the evenir
track me
school atb
something
gan.
To insu
clubs and
some sort
of the Cou
university
The pa
'19, of Sa
the Michii
ington's b
oL sympat
of the un
W. L. I
as a mem
the place4
graduated
Stanley B
Stanley
retary in
Schanz, of
last night.
pere Harr;
er, '16L, t
The coupl
troit. Mr
versity w
and the D
Postpon
The dat
ing of Cra

by a committee of the Stu- Liv atetinini o, The Misses Kichuchi and Sadakata
ncil which was appointed at returned yesterday after having con- are expected to be great favorites in
ar meeting of the Council ferred with men from Wisconsin, I the Japanese act. They will be as-
linois, Chicago, Northwestern, and sisted by Genok Nakai, Mittsu Imake,
from such dances will be Minnesota. According to their state- Kameichi Sugiyama, Shinmatsu Yoko-
to such charitable pro- ients the plan which was presented yama, and Mitsugi Kirchara. Music
e war ambulance fund. Mem- by Vice-President Kies, of the Na- from Madame Butterfly will be used
te faultywilltional City Bank, met with universal
e faculty will chaperone the apoalC in this scene, which will include a
which will be under the di- approval, number of native Japanese dances.
the Student Council. A. S. To Go to Chicago April 1 The Hawaiian scene is expected to
G. L. Cook, '17L, and W. L These six men selected will go to be one of the biggest hits of the en-z
16A, compose the committee Chicago on April 1 to confer with tire production, each feature in this
r the matter. Vice-President Kies. Out of this act being a headliner. Miss Helen Ely
ght will be held on June 2, number the bank has specified that will lead a chorus of six Hawaiians
ig before the Interscholastic it will pick out one man and perhaps in a Hula Hula, accompanied on uku-
et, in order to give the high more if they make a favorable im- leles and guitars by a native orchestra
letes an opportunity to learn pression. The man or men selected secured from the Ford factory in De-
of university life at Michi- will start to work about July 1 in troit. Frank Grover, well known as a
the training school of the National campus entertainer, and one of the
re that all fraternities, house City Bank in New York. They will leading characters in this year's Union
sororities are provided with receive $50 a month while in the em- Opera, will also appear in this act.
of fire escapes, a committee ploy of the bank. This amount has Helen McAndrews will take the part
ncil is co-operating with the been determined upon only because of the Princess, with Helen Ely, Adele
health service, the bank thinks that sum sufficient to Crandall, Blanche Gordon, Gertrude
rents of Elbert S. Bryant, pay a man while he is receiving valu- Gunn, Leila Pike, M. Lockhart and
aginaw, who was killed on able knowledge in the form of a schol- Ruth Ely as the Hula girls.
gan Central tracks on Wash- arship. C. A. Ritchie, as the warrior and
irthday, were sent a letter The sophomore students will of Flora Lowry, as the Indian Princess,
hy in behalf of the students course work only during the summer appear as the leading characters in
iversity. (Continued on Page Six) the act representing the original in-
Rindge, '16A, was sworn in - - habitants of America. They will be
iber of the Council to take assisted by Elizabeth McCrae, Allen
of A. V. Moninger, '16A, who F d Ots O cur Edwards, Honor Gaines, Dorothy
this month. in C t*4.of a1 Pierce, Geneva Hayes, Carmen Graves
and Jessie Spence.
ooks, '161, Weds Local Girl Carlos Zanelli's wonderful tenor
Books, '15L, recreatton sec- Authorities of City Unable to Main- voice will be heard for the first time
Detroit, and Miss Helen taut Order; Mayor Resigns; Po- in the Revue in the Spanish scene, in
'this city, were married here lice Clash I which he takes the part of the senor
Among the guests present - who falls in love with the singing of
y Bell, '16L, and Lewis Coop- Madrid, Mar. 1. (delayed).-Serious the beautiful maiden, played by Alber-
he latter acting as best man. rioting has taken place in Madrid and tina Rasch. Other senors in this act
e left inimediatedly for De- also in Valencia anu most of the prov- will be Jose Blanco, Lino Zapata, Man-
Books, while at the uni- inces as a result of a general strike uel del Valle and M. Dimas. The
as a member of the Acacia on account of the high cost of food. assisting. senoritas will be the Misses
)elta Theta Phi fraterntiy. The mayor of Madrid resigned because Blodget, Miller, Huff, McAllister and
the municipal authorities were un- Thomas.
e Craftsmen Club Meeting able to maintain order. All retail Grover Takes Lead in British Number
e for the next regular meet- business has been suspended. Strug- The Great Britain scene will provide
.ftsmen, student Masonic so- gles letween bands of rioters and the the great opportunity for lovers 'of
been postponed until March Iolice have taken place and some strik- modern fun, song, and dancing. Frank'
.owing Saturday. ers have been wcunded. (Continued oin Page Six)

Nearly 200 prospective members for
the Upper Peninsula club of the Uni-
versity of Michigan turned out at the
initial meeting of that organization,
which was held at the Union last night.
Short talks outlining the possibilities
of the organization were made by "Bil-
ly" Cochrane and Tom L. Tolan. Elec-
tions resulted in the selection of B. T.
Larson, '17M, as the first president of
the club. J. L. Garvey, 18, was named
secretary and treasurer. Seven vice-
presidents representing the various
sections of the upper peninsula were
elected as follows: C. W. Reade, '17E;
T. L. Tolan, '16; G. H. Laing, '18; R.
L. Finch, '17; A. G. Eriksen, '19; R. H.
Cady, 17E; H. Gray, '17. Plans are
being formulated for a "smoker" and a
dance to be given in the near future.
This matter will be left to a com-
mittee to be appointed by the officers
of the club. It is also planned to hold
a reunion of Michigan men sometime
during 'the coming summer, in the op-
per peninsula.
WHA'S OIA G ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Cold; fair, with northerly winds.
TODAY
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, room
401, IJniversity hall..
7:30 o'clock-Jefferson Debating so-
ciety meets, Jefferson rooms, Law
building.
7:30 o'clock-Webster Debating so-
ciety meets, Webster rooms, Law
building.
8:00 o'clock-Annual oratorical con-
test, University hall.
9:00 o'clock - Junior Engineer's
dance, Union.
TOMORROW
9:00 o'clock-Michigan Union dance,
Michigan Union.

American Loss of Life on Armed Mer-
chantmen to Be Sufficient Cause
for Bmaking Off Relations
Washington, Mar. 2.-These were
the important developments in the
submarine situation today: Senator
Gore, of Oklahoma, one of the Demo-
cratic leaders, startled the senate by
charging that President Wilson had
told Senators Stone and Kern that
unless Germany backs down on the
submarine issue, he Would sever dip-
lomatic relations. The senator also
said the President stated that war
probably would follow; and that this
might not necessarily be an evil to the
United States as it would bring the
European struggle to a conclusion by
mid-summer and render a great serv-
ice to civilization.
Senator Gore challenged Senator
Stone, chairman of the foreign rela-
tions committee, and Senator Kerni,
to deny that the President had made
the extraordinary remark attributed
to him. Senator Stone entered a
partial denial and Senator Kern didn't
respond to the challenge. The White
House issued an unqualified denial of
any utterance on the part of the Presi-
dent to which any such meaning could
be attached as was set forth by the
(Continued on Page Six)
MORGANPRISES
SCNERYI FOR OPERA.
Director Says Work of Detroit Artists
Will Be Equal to That of
Broadway Shows
TICKET SALE RESUMED MONDAY
"I am confident that the scenery
for the opera will be as good as that
of any show on Broadway," was the
immediate answer of Director Morgan,
when interviewed as to his opinion of
the stage settings for "Tres Rouge."
"The two artists who are working on
the scenery are putting forth their
best efforts. In fact, I never saw men
so interested in their work."
Mr. Morgan visited Detroit yester-
day and made a final inspection of the
art work, and although the greater
part has been completed, afew altera-
tions are yet to be made. Both scen-
ery and costumes will arrive in Ann
Arbor on Friday, March 10, thus al-
lowing the members of the show ample
time for rehearsals before the first
performance on Wednesday, March 15.
The scenery for the first act of the
show represents the home of Mrs.
Gregg at Newport, and has a Span-
ish effect with unusual coloring. The
second act portrays an elaborate ball
room at Mrs. Gregg's home.
Contrary to the ticket sale announce-
ment made yesterday, the sale of tick-
ets will be resumed at the Whitney
theatre box office at 10:00 o'clock Mon-
day morning.
FRESI LITS TO GIVE SECOND
1FlIXER" IN BARBOUR SATURDAY
Plans for the second "Mixer" dane
given under the auspices of the Fresh
it class in Barbour gymnasium on Sat-
urday afternoon from 2:30 to 5:30
o'clock have been completed. Invi-
tations are extended to freshmen, but
upperclassmen are also urged to at-
tend. A charge of 25 cents will be
made.

Chaperones for the occasion will be
President Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs.
Hutchins, Dean John R. Effinger and
Mrs. Effinger, br. J. F. Scott and Mrs.
Scott, Mr. H. P. Scott and Mrs. Scott,
Mrs. E. L. Gates, Miss G H. Beggs, and
Miss Alice Evans The Fischer' nor-

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