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March 02, 1916 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Great Cosmopolitan Pageant
HILL ATDITORIUM
March 7 and 8
Complete, Unified, Colossal

All

"Above All Nations Is Humanity"
Ilk I

SE ATS ON SALE NOW
Ann Arbor........Hill Auditorium
State & German American Say. Bk.
Detroit.. Grinnell Bros. Music Store
Ypsilanti The Rowima Company
By Mail Order
.50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.x0

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I

d by the Cosmopolitan Club

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, MARCH 2, 1916

To Further Internationalis

i

EVUE TO FOUND
OREIHNERS LOAN
fUAT MA N

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X
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President Harry B. Hutchins
Supports 'Review.

S

"In my judgment, the propo-
sition is a worthy one, and I
wish it the best of success," said
President Harry B. Hutchins,
when asked his attitude towatl
the All Nation Revue.

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FOREIGN STUDENTS IN UNIVERSITY
STAGE MAMOTH INDOOR SPECTACLE
MARCH 7-8 iN HlLL AUDITORIU

PRESENT WAR INTERFERES'
HOME AID TO SUCH
STUDENTS

WITH

ALSO TO FURTHER DEMOCRACY
Performance Seeks to Teach Ideals
Which Cosmopolitan Clubs
Stand For
To found a loan fund for foreign stu-
dents and to further the cause of cos-
mopolitanism in America is the two-
fold purpose of the All Nation Revue

FIND FOREIGN STUDENTS
jWONDERFULLY TALENTED

Cosmopolitans Show Enthusiasm
Portraying Native
Life

In

George M. Cohan himself was never
more pleasantly surprised with the

which is to appear under the auspices 1 talent for one of his productions thanI

of the Michigan Cosmopolitan club in
Hill Auditorium March 7 and 8.
At present, there is no way in which
a student from another country who
is in financial difficulty can be aided
except by the humiliating process of
petitioning the Board of Regents for
an extention of time on the payment
of his tuition. The faculty members
are glad to help the foreigners here
but they are handicapped by lack of
funds.
Serious financial difficulties are more
prevalent among the undergraduates
who hail from other lands, than among
Americans, and especially is this true
during the present war.
It is the aim of the All Nation Revue
committee to place the proceeds from
the production under the supervision
of a committee composed of the officers
of the Cosmopolitan club and of mem-
bers of 'the faculty, to be distributed
through the hands of the university
treasurer to any foreigners who are
in difficulty.
At least 25 different nationalities are
enrolled at Michigan, and the import-
ance of this portion of the under-
graduate body is becoming continually
more fully appreciated. The faculty
has a committee on foreign students
which devotes much time to advising
these students and helping them in all
possible ways. The members of this
committee are heartily in favor of the
All Nation Revue, not only because of
its two-fold purpose, but also because
it will give the foreigners an oppor-
tunity to demonstrate the latent his-
trionic ability which they possess.
"HUMANITY" LOSES HIS HAIR
Louis Reimann Forced to Wear Wig in
Revue Performance
The order was given to the program
manager,who left hurriedly on a fren-
zied chase for Reimann-Humanity, in
the All Nation Revue. Along the trail

was Aubrey Stauffer when a hundred
or more of the foreign students were
handed over to him to train for their
several parts in the All Nation Revue.
When rehearsals started, it soon
became evident that to judge the for-
eign student by his showing inade in
the routine of student life was im-
possible. They seem out of place
there, but give them a part to play,
give them a bit of their native life
to portray and at once their enthus-
iasm rises and their ability shines
forth. Mr. Stauffer, in commenting on
the progress of the cast, had nothing
but the highest praise for the foreign
students taking part.
Fifteen different nationalities are
working together, and when the pres-
ent war is brought to mind, in which
the majority of their homelands are
involved, and when the spirit of,
friendship is noted with which the
representatives of these warring na-
tions are working, it brings to mind
more forcefully than ever the signifi-
cance of the whole movement for
which the pageant stands, "Above all
nations is Humanity." The spirit of
unity breathes throughout the pro-
duction, and the different scenes are.
interwoven through their efforts to
make of it a true play of "Humanity."
In the process of selecting material
an abundance of individual ability
has been found. Arthur Seelye, lead-
er of the Zulus, thoroughly acquaint-
ed with the language of the natives,
brings out with the aid of his follow-
ers the spirit of the wild African
tribes so realistically that onlookers
forget for the moment that this is
America, and are transported in im-
agination to the jungle wilds of the
South country.
The Japanese, in the portrayal ofI
their quaint customs, produce an en-
chanting effect. In the characteri-
zation of the maid and her mistress.
Miss Kikuchi and Miss Sadakata make
this scene one of the most attractive
bits in the show. It is in this scene
that Miss Kikuchi presents an original
Japanese dance.
Stars? Of Course They are Stars
The advertising man was soliciting
ads.
"Who are your stars?" asked the
prospect.
"Say," said the shooter of ads,
"we've got all the stars there are-
the milky way looks like .a comet be-
side our show. Albertina Rasch, pre-
meer dansoose of the Metropolitan
Opera Co., Pan-American Exposition,
Royal Opera, Vienna,-and as for sing-
ers-there's Zanelli, the Chillian song
bird; as good a twiddler of notes as
you ever hope to hear-"
"Yes-yes, I know," said the prospect,
but he isn't as good as Caruso. Get
somebody-"
"Caruso," broke in the Ad-heister,-
"Caruso had a brother didn't he?"
"I believe he did," admitted the

ALBERTINA RASCH
Premiere Danseuse of Metropolitan Grand Opera Co., and Royal Opera,
Vienna; Premiere Danseuse of Parker-Hooker $10,000 Prize Opera,
San Francisco, 1915
Life of -anseuse Not All Jade
Up of Bouquets and Applause

ich igan Leads
In Nation Revue
Corda Fratres Plans to Have Leadingw
Universities Stage
Production
Oberlin has telegraphed the commit-
tee in charge of the All Nation Revue
that the Cosmopolitan Club there
wishes to reserve the year 1923 for the<
production of an All Nation spectacle
comparable to the one to be staged in
Hill Auditorium on March 7 and 8.l
Following the sanction of this move-
ment for the furtherance of the motto
of the Corda Fratres of Cosmopolitan'
clubs of America, "Above All Things
is Humanity," it was decided that thei
Michigan production was of sufficient
merit to be perpetuated, and at the
annual conclave of the. national asso-
ciation, a committee was appointed to
decide which of the colleges having a
large number of foreign students,
should be next to present a spectacle.
It is expected that Harvard univer-
sity will be chosen for 1917, to be suc-
ceeded annually by productions at one
of the following: Cornell, Wisconsin,
Oberlin, Pennsylvania and Illinois.
HAREM DANCES IN GENUINE
TURK COSTUMES WORTH $3,000
Draperies for the Turkish scene are
to be one of the main features of the
Revue. The Harem will dance in cos-
tumes worth, all told, $3,000.00. The
sultan will sit on rugs and cushions
valued at $5,000.00, and the hooka, or
water pipe, which he will smoke, is
one loaned from a private collection
of oriental antiques, and was at one
time the possession of the royal prince
of Turkey.
FATHER AND TWO CHILDREN TO
APPEAR IN SAME ACT IN REVUE

RECORD BREAKING CAST OF 150,
SCENERY AND LIGHTING
EFFECTS USED
SECURE MANY OUTSIDE ARTISTS
Albertina Rasch, Dorothy Conger,
Vema Marsh, and Carlos Zanelli
Are Stars
Foreign students in the University
of Michigan will stage the most
stupendous indoor spectacle yet to be
attempted by any but professional
performers when they present their
gigantic All Nation Revue in Hill
Auditorium on the evenings of March
7 and 8. More than one hundred and
fifty persons' will appear in the cast
representing thirteen different nation-
alities, and coming from all over the
world. Costumes, lighting effects and
scenery worth many thousands of dol-
lars will be used in the production
which will cost $5,000 to stage.
In addition to using the cream of
the local talent, the management has
secured the services of professional
artists who are renowned through-
out Europe as well as this country
From the time the curtain first rises
on the scene of the Prologue until the
entire cast en masse sings the "Pil
grims'" Chorus from Tannhauser, one
scene will follow another in rapid
succession, each adding a new touch
to the general effect of the spectacle
yet each being rendered in native cos
tume and in the native tongue.
Despite the wide variety of scene
portrayed, the production is a unified
whole, which in artistic finish and
mass effect has rarely been equalled
The book is the work of William Fori
Jr., a student in the university. Th
Prologue has already been printed
and sent out over the state and ha
attracted wide comment.

"Warming up" is not, the exclusive,
prerogative of husky athletes who re-I
fuse to start several hours of strenu-
ous exertion "cold."l
For half an hour before each ap-
pearance, dainty little Albertina
Rasch, the Viennese premiere dan-c
seuse of the Metropolitan Opera Com-1
pany, who is to appear in the All Na-
tion Revue, goes through a series of
gymnastic stunts which would make
a hardened veteran stop and con-
sider.
Not only does Miss Rasch "warm
up" for each dance, but also for every
rehearsal, and for her daily practice,
which lasts about three hours, and
has resulted in such perfect physical
control that she can balance for five
minutes on her toe tips without a
movement.
Few people, witnessing the appear-.
ance of this dancer who has won fame
in Europe and America alike, realize,
when she floats out upon the stage, that
for thirty long minutes she has been
indulging in hard exercises on the
parallel bars, and skipping the rope.
During her act she seems so ab-
solutely unconscious of the audience,
so absorbed in the pleasure of danc-
ing, that it is almost a disillusionment
to realize the long days of painful
practice she has passed through in
order to please those* who see her
Many authorities have declared that
Miss Rasch is second only to Pav-
Iowa as a dancer in ballet and solo
and all who witness her representa-
tions are struck by the similarity of
style between the two. Since both re-
ceived their training in the Royal
Opera of Vienna, this is only natural,
and the reputation which that school
has won in recent years is in itself
sufficient recommendation for the
petite dancer.
Miss Rasch began her career in the
Vienna Opera at the age of six and
was under a strict course of instruc-
tion until she was 14. After attain-
ing this age, she appeared repeatedly
in the Austrian capital, and was
brought to America by the Metropoli-
tan Opera Company.
During the past summer she was
chosen as ballerina and solo dancer
for the Horatio Parker $10,000 prize
opera, "Fairyland," produced in Los
Angeles. The press of that city gave
her criticisms of high praise, par-

ticularly the Examiner, which com-
mented as follows:
"Miss Albertina Rasch commanded
universal admiration as the premiere
ballerina; her dancing brought to
mind both Pavlowa and Maud Allen,
for Miss Rasch is a toe dancer of
exquisite skill and has interpretive art
in her little finger tips."
1-. G. KING FURNISHES CHINESE
COSTUMES FOR ORIENTAL ACT
More than 200 years ago the Man-
churians invaded China and estab-
lished themselves as the masters of
that great country. With them they
brought their native costumes, which
differed materially from those of the
natives.
On March 7 and 8, in Hill Audi-
torium, costumes worn by the Manchus,
the former rulers of China, will .be
worn. These official court dresses
were secured in China by H. Gilbert
King, and are extremely valuable. The
itilization of such costumes adds much
to the realism of the production.

One of the most interesting features
of the All Nation Revue lies in the
fact that three members of the same
family, Mr. William Burt, his son Fritz,
7 years old, and his little daughter,
Marie, aged 5, will all take part'in
the performance. Mr. Burt plays the
part of the watchman in the "Toys of
Nuremburg" scene, Marie is one of the
toy dolls, and Fritz is the captain of
the squad of tin soldiers.

Humanity Is Central Figure
The theme is laid around the cen
tral figure, Humanity, played by Louw
Reimann. Humanity, with his hand
maidens, Love, Friendship, Hono
Truth, Beauty, Knowledge, Progres
Labor, Humor and Hope, first witnes
the various nations of the world, tt
handmaidens going out, singly, to bin
up the ragged edges of mankind.
The handmaidens are played in o:
der by the Misses Fletcher, Domboo:
ajian, McBride, Seelye, Crowley, Sar
gent, Povah, Durfee, Cooley, an
Wuerfel.
First Africa is depicted by a grot
of Zulu warriors led by A. A. Seely
This act is -spoken entirely in th
Zulu language, and includes a thrillir
battle between two rival bands c
warriors.
From Africa, the audience will 1
lead into the far east, where nine bor
fide Chinese, headed by Young, Kin
and Lee, furnish a varied entertain
ment including shuttlecock dancin
sword dancing and a sample of Chi:
ese theatrical performances.
Albertina Rasch in Dance of Scaral
Miss Albertina Rasch, as the Daugl
er of the Nile, holds the center of tb
(Continued on Page Two)

Miss Margaret Cooley, as Humor
called State street he was found. The
P. M. took one look at his head and
groaned.
"What's up?" said Louie-"sick?"
"Lost," groaned the director's lieu-
tenant. "You've lost your chance to
become classic." Honorable Homo
grew interested.
"Why?" he queried.
"Because," said theprogram man,
"you've had a hair cut and it can't
possibly grow out in time to be curled.
Now you'll have to wear a wig.

prospect.
"Sure. Of course he did. Well
man Zanelli is his brother."

this

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LADIES and GENTLEMEN
EAT AT
JACK FR O S T'S HOT LUNCH
911 N. University Ave. Prone 73-J
Everything Clean and Wholesome .Know What You Are Eating
See It cooked, and get it just as you like it.
Reasonable sized orders delivered to a reasonable distance
FREE OF CHARGE

-All Photos by Daines and
MISS DOROTHY CONGER
Classic Greek Dancer Fro m Detroit, Who Brings Chorus of Six Girls for All Nation Revue.

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