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March 01, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Phones:-Ed
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TELEGRAPH SEI
NEW YO]

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1916.

P

..

URE

Princeton Senior STUDENTS TO GET
Has Disappeared . rYDEgIUPC IAITH

ENCH SHIP
of Latest Sea

Son of Syrian Missionary is Missed
by Classmates; Intended to
Teach A stronomy in Syria
Princeton, N. J., Feb. 29.-Members
of the. Princeton senior class are
greatly perturbed over the disap-
pearance of William West, one of
the class' well-known members. West
has been missing since last Thurs-
day morning when he took breakfast
at Clover Inn, his upper-class eat-"
ing club, and the most strenuous ef-
forts on the part of the university
and class authorities to locate him
have been unavailing.
West's parents were missionaries
in Syria, his father dying some years
ago. His mother, however, is still
in the field. He had planned to
teach astronomyt in the Beirut schoil._
in Syria, after having received his
degree in June.

red
d to

ovence was
nean Satur-
aboard the

LA! LIIILIRUL lV1111.
NE[W YORK .BANK
PLAN TO GIVE FELLOWSHIPS EN-
ABLING STUDENTS TO SPEND
YEAR IN EAST
CONFER IN CHICAGO TOAY
Dean Effinger and Professor Dowrie
Will Represent Michigan; Nation-
al City Bank Starts Idea
Dean John R. Effinger and Prof.
Geo. W. Dowrie will leave for Chicago
this morning to represent the Univer-
sity of Michigan at a conference to be
held at the Chicago Athletic club to-
day, with representatives of the Na-
tional City Bank of New York and
delegates from eight eastern and five
western universities. At this meeting
plans will be discussed by which busi-
ness fellowships may be established
in the various institutions in collab-
oration with the National City Bank.
The arrangement has already been
entered into between Harvard, Yale,
Princeton, New York University, Co-
lumbia, Cornell, and the University of
Pennsylvania, and the National City
Bank of New York for co-operating in,
this practical course of education for
foreign banking commerce. W. S.
Kies, vice president of the bank and
(Continued on Page Six)
OPEN SEAT SALE TO PUBLIC
Union Opera to Attract Many from Out
of City Is Prediction; Music and
Lyrics Sent to Publishers

ed at
have

'man as-
itered it-j
rs in an1
e Woevre
ss. Here

American Ships
In Danger Zone
Germany's New Submarine Campaign
to Open at Midnight; Eight Liners
May Be Destroyed
New York, Feb. 29.-When the new
new submarine campaign of Germany
ospens at midneght the following ocean
liners will be nearing the war zone:
Italia, Anchor line; America, Italian'
line; Patriot, Sabre line; Finland and
Philadelphia, American Line; Ioan-
nina and Vasiless, Constantinos Greek
Line, and Pannononia, Cunard line.
Explosion Kills
Thirteen In ..amine

, and
,an's
froin
The
from
tport-

fort- Disaster Probably Caused by
'era Dust; Fifty-two Brought
north Safely from Mine
v-. I

Coal

ast oL v er-
o the con-
Mihiel bat-
Six)

T

IONS

nent Calling
bInarhie

Sim

,SE REPOR TS ARE OT

Washington, Feb. 2.-President
Wilson startled Congress this evening
by calling for a show-down on his
submarine , policy. The president
vrote to the acting chairman of the
rules committee of the house, and
asked for an early vote on the reso-
lution now pending which warns
Americans from traveling on armed
merchant vessels.
The president in this letter declares
that "the report that there are di-
vided counsels in congress in re-
gard to the foreign policy of the gov-
ernment is being made industrious use
of in foreign capitals." He expresses
the belief that the report is false and
adds that "so long as it is anywhere
credited, it cannot fail to do the
greatest harm and expose the country
to the most serious risks.
The president thus has thrown
down every barrier against the pub-
lic discussion of foregn affairs in
congress and has in fact invited a
frank and full exchange of views on
the administration's record. The
challenge from the president will.
mark the opening of a debate in con-
press which is likely to be one of
the most spirited and important that
has taken place in years. What the
outcome will be is now, of course, a
matter of mere speculation.

Kempton, W. Va., Feb. 29.-Thir-
teen men are dead, and fifty-two have,
been brought safely from mine No.
42 of the David Coal and Coke com-
pany here, where an explosion oc-
curred this morning soon after the
miners had gone to work. The mine,'
which is a shaft 427 feet deep, was
not badly damaged. The explosion,
it was stated, was probably caused
by dust.
Their feet Are All
Wrong Say Faculty
Examination of Pedal Extremities of
Oregon Freshman Girls Shows
Imperfect Toe Lines
Eugene, Ore., Feb. 29.-To correct
defective feet of girls caused in most
cases by wearing high-heeled, pointed-
toe shoes, classes ar% to be organized
at the University of Oregon for special
physical culture work and instruction.
A report made public today says prints
taken of the feet of 23 freshmen re-
vealed that only three had "good feet"
and not one had a perfect toe line. In
the future all girls entering the Uni-
versity will have their footprints taken.
HUTCHINS TALKS TO ENGINEERS
President Will Speak to Juniors at
9:00 o'Clock Tomorrow
President Harry 1. Hutchins will
address the junior engineers at their
regular assembly at 9:00 o'clock to,
morrow morning in room 348 in the,
Engineering building. Dean M. E.
Cooley, of the engineeirng college, will
introduce the speaker.
The general trend of President
Hutchins' remarks will have refer-
ence to subjects which the engineer
should have acquaintance with out-
side the technical field.

Seats for the Union opera "Tres
Rouge" will go on sale to the general
public at the Hill auditorium box of-
fice at 9:00 o'clock this morning.
Reports indicate that an unusually
large number of alumni will be in Ann
Arbor to take in the annual show. The
report of the sale to date is better
than that of any previous year, and the
management expects packed houses
at each performance. A large number
of seats were sold to women on the day
reserved for them.
The combined rehearsal of cast and
chorus held at the Union last night
was taken up chiefly by instruction in
special dances. As stated before, it
is a fair prediction that the dancing
of this year's production will exceed
that of any other year.
The lyrics and music have been sent
to the publishers and will be put on
sale at the time of the first per-
formance.
PREPARE 86 OPENING SCENE
Allegory Representing Humanity Is
to Be In Prologue; Costume And
Scenery Are Costly
Humanity's robe of many pockets,
phich occupies such an important
place in the prologue scene of the All
Nation Revue, is a wonderful piece of
scenic artistry, in the estimation of
Director Stauffer, who is producing the
spectacle.
One by one, the various nations ap-
pearing int he Revue are gathered to-
gether by Humanity's handmaidens,
into the folds of this robe, the ragged
edges of the world being thus bound
up and gathered in to humanity, in the
allegorical presentation of the theme.
The robe itself will cost $200, while
the scenery which completes the pro-
logue setting will cost several hun-
dreds of dollars. In the moments
when the robe is not being used as
such, it will be used as a curtain, as
its huge size prohibits the installation
of another curtain.

N. Y. Democrats
Choose Wilson
Eulogistic Platform Prepared by State
Conference Is Sure of Adoption;
Policies Are Prased
Syracuse, N. Y., Feb. 29.-President
Wilson's re-election Is to be unequivo-
cally urged in the platform to be
adopted by the Democratic state con-
ference tomorrow, following a recital
of a score of federal laws enacted by
the Democratic president and Congress
and an analysis of the President's
treatment of the European and Mexican
situations.
No platform adopted by a convention
of Wilson office holders could be more
eulogistic of the President and his
policies than the one which is to be
unanimously approved at the Demo-
cratic state cenference tomorrow. In
return President Wilson and his im-
mediate advisers are permitting the
Democratic state organization, con-
trolled by Tammany, to maneuver the
operation of the conferences without
interference ,aside from the sugges-
tion as to Flynn's keystone speech
in answering Root, and that the state
platform be confined to national issues.
LIFE IMEMBERSIP
CAPiNBEGINS.
First Night's Canvass Adds 166 Names
to List, Puttng Total Number
Above I04 Mark.
VISIT FRATERNITIES T 0 N I G H T
In the first night's cnvass for Union
life members, 166 names were added
to the present list, bringing the total
number of members into the neigh-
borhood of 1250.
The committees of J. F. Meade, '17E,I
and H. .Gray Muzzy, '17, brought in a
total of 29 new memberships eacn,
while H. E. Ramsey, '17KE, was first in
the individual showing with eight.
In the opening night of the campaign
the canvassing was restricted to the
independents of the campus. Staats
M. Abrams, '17E, general chairman of
of the undertaking, was pleased with
the showing, and believes that this
excellent start will mean the ultimate
attainment of the Union's goal of 3,000
student life members.
At a banquet given for the entire
body of committeemen last evening at
the Union at 5:30 o'clock, two hundred
canvassers were told of the proposition
and urged to make the students realize
that this Union building project was
a student undertaking for the benefit
of the students, and that if the alumni
consider it worthy of the support that
they have thus far given, the students,
who will profit by the new building,
ought to be willing to do more. Theg
canvassing started at 6:30 o'clock and
lasted until 10:00 o'clock.
The entire body of solicitors will
start out again tonight, and will make1
a canvass of the fraternity houses. This
portion of the campaign will take the
next two nights, and its completion
will bring the canvassing to an end.
By 10:00 o'clock Thursday night, the
Union will know in actual figures tot
just what extent the campus wants to
see the Union building plan succeed.-
Harry Gault, '17L; president of thet
Union, is enthusiastic over the pros-
pects in the canvas.T

The general chairman of the entire;
canvass is Staats M. Abrams, 117E,
and the following are serving under1
him ashcaptains, each in charge of fif-
teen men: J. F Meade, '17E; H. G.
Muzzy, '17; Stanley P. Smith, '17; Wil-
liam K. Niemann '17; T. S. Cox, '17;1
W. Lee Watson '17E; W. T. Adams,
'17; H. A. Taylor, '17E; W. D. Nance,c
'17; B. A. Stenberg, '17E; R. W Col-
(Continued on Page Six)I

*
*
*
*
*

* Assistant Intercollege mana-
* ger - Willis Brodhead, '17E,
* Ralph W. Harbert, '17, Harold A.
* Taylor, '17E.
* (Three to be elected.

* * * * * * * * * * * *
*
* NOMINEES FOR ATHLETIC
* OFFICES
* e__
: Football manager-John W.
* Langs, '17, John C. Robbins, '17E.
* (One to be elected.)
* Assistant football manager-
* Robert H. Bennett, '18, Charles
* F. Boos, '18, James E. Driscoll,
* '18, John D. Hibbard, '18E, Ezra
* W. Lockwood, '18, ,Howard. P.
* Nicholson, '18, Charles Y. Os-
* burn, '18E, Leland N. Scofield,
't8.
* (Four to be elected.)

's * o * * ~~ * * * * * *

Combined Societies Give Dance
Under the combined auspices of the
Alchemist and Phi Lambda Upsilon so-
cieties, a dance was given at the Pack-
ard Dancing academy last night. Ike
Fischer's popular sextette furnished
the music. Prof. A. H. White and
Mrs. White and Prof. E, E. Ware and
Mrs. Ware Atted as chaperones.
I A TIAT' CflIT- nN

The office of foot
only Varsity man
cided at today's el
office of intercolle
filled for the first
ation last spring.
the offices of footN
manager will take
(Continued o

*:
*
*:
*

ELECTION
IN UN
BE
ALL MALE

The offices to
are among the t
the athletic assn
open to student
sity. Those po
which carry wit]
board of directo
association.are r

*
*
*
9

WILL TAKl

Intereolege manager-Albert
E. Stoll, '17L, James W. Thomas,
'16.
(One to be elected.)

I

I TUA11 Q UU114 MI

*"
*:
1'
*I
*,
*,
*:

Weather of Ann Arbor and vicin-
Ity--Snow flurries and variable winds.
TODAY
7:1f5 o'clock--Dixie Club get-togeth-
er meeting, Michigan Union.
8:00 o'clock-Louis P. Hall speaks,
Alumni Memorial Hall.
7:00 o'clock-Round-up club smoker
at Union.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of combined
members of Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C.
A., Newberry hall.
0:00 o'clock-Tau Beta Pi dinner,
Michigan Union.
5:00 o'clock-Vespers Newberry
hall.
11:00 o'clock a. m.-Fresh Engineer
assembly, room 348, Eng. building.
TOMORROW
8:00 o'clock-Sophomore engineer-
ing assembly, room 348, Eng. build-
ing.
9:00 o'clock-Junior engineering
assembly, room 348 Eng. building..
10:00 o'clock-Senior engineering
assembly, room 348. Eng. building.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of local sec-
tion of Am. Chemical society, chemis-
try building amphitheater..
7:30 o'clock-E. C. Sullivan speaks,
room 165, chemistry building.
7:30 o'clock-Kentucky club meets,
Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock-Upper peninsula men
meet, Michigan Union..
7:30 o'clock - Deutscher Verein
meets, rooms, U-Hall.
7:80 o'clock-Civil Engineering so-
ciety smoker, room 301, Eng. building:
7:00 o'clock-Canadian club business
meeting; Union.

vs.

BE

Election today, 11:00 to 3:00,
o'clock, main corridor University
hall. Present athletic coupon
No. 33.

Cards Containing Q
New Institution to I
at Next Engineer
ANSWERS MAY DEC:

STUDI

called up
occasions

letic assoclatlo
ested In havn
are to be filled
of campus sei
dent body at 1
vote. The hou
o'clock-the p
hall--coupon
athletic book r<
lege to vote.
MIchigan;

Cards containing certain que
the honor system will be di,
at the next class assemblie,
engineering college, in order
views of the student body
ascertained by the honor com:
Five questions will be pri
the cards, and sufficient room
left after each query for a full
The substance of the question
as follows:
1. Do you think there has be
or less cheating since the in
of the honor system?
2. Has the feeling against
increased by the new systen
3. Have you acquired a feelin
sonal responsibility in regard t
ing as a result of the honor s
4. Have you any suggesti
make?
5. Are you in favor of the
ance of the honor system w
modifications as future conlditi
make advisable!
In order to provide those w
not attend th.ir assembly a
questions, a lare number of t
will be placed i.n the Enginee
ciety's room. 4 box for the
will also be plated in the'san
The results o? this "census'
a large factor in the faculty's
as to whether, the honor sy
to stay. Ever& engineer sh
out one of th cards.

MANAGERSHIPS TO BE VT
THIS AFTERNOON1 USEI

WISISTLY MUSIC

XCELLENT CAST
ONE DAY SEAT SALE for

HkAEAL

'"T RE S

ROUGE"

HILL AVDITORIVM BOX OFFICC
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1st, 9 A M.

SALE TO GENERAL PUBLIC, Wednesday, 9 a. m. to noon and 2 to 5 p. m. Choice seats for all performances. Last opportunity to secure the best before ticket sale at
PERFORMANCES: Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday Nights, and Saturdsy Matnee, March 15, 16, 17, 18, In Whitney Theatre
PRICES: $2.00, $1.50, $1.00; 75c
inr-u tnftit'[ BETTEL BOOK SOMETHING

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