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February 23, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

OP.
x '

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
ELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI.

No.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1916.

PRICE FIVE GENTS

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IS REPOR TED IN
MEDITERRANEAN
DISPATCH FROM COPENHAGENX
QUOTES STORY FROM
, G ERMA N SOURCE
OERMANS ADVANCE !N WEST

Rebel Arabs Captured from British
Egypt; erma iians Think They'-ve
Made Trimble for ToImmies

in

London, Feb. 22.-A news agency
dispatch from Copenhagen quotes the
statement from German newspapers to
the effect that a Japanese fleet has
arrived in the Mediterranean with a.
number of craft. It is believed that
the long promised aid from the Ori-
ental ally has been fulfilled by the
coming of the Nipponese expedition.
Gernaans Make Trench Gains
London, Feb. 22.-Two considerable
German gains on the western front
are announced in the official statement
issued today. The first was in Artois,
where the Germans won the first line
French trenches on a front of 800
meters, and continued to the com-
municating trenches behind, gaining
a foothold there.
The French counter attack drove
the Germans from all but a few of
the positions they had seized in the
communicating trenches but the Ger-
mans still hold the first line position.
The German force amounted to seven
battalions and, acording to the-French
report, suffered heavy losses. The at-
tack was received by a very heavy
(Continued on Page Six)
NINE DIE I GN
RARAD CRASH
Three Trains on New Haven Road
Collide Near Bridgeport, Conn.;
More May Die
YALE GRID STAR AMONG INJURED
Bridgeport, Conn., Feb. 22.--Nine
people were killed and 39 injured,
.some fatally, in a wreck involving
three trains near here yesterday af-
ternoon.
A crack express train known as the
Connecticut River Special, on the New
Haven Railroad, which was about 25
minutes late, had stopped for a min-
uto .or more about nine miles east of
here, late this afternoon, when a lo-
cal, running at a high rate of speed,
swel:t around a curve just'back of the
stalled express and crashed into it.
An instant later a freight train, also
bound westward on the scodl or in-
ner west-bound track, struck the
buckled wreck bulging from the out-
side west-bound track.
Among the injured passegers are
John R. Kilkatriclq, of New York,
former Yale athlete and football play-
er; Allan Corey, son of William E.
Corey, former president of the United
States Steel Corporation, and former
Yale baseball captain; Morgan O'Brien
the son of former Justice Morgan J.
O'Brien, of the New York State su-
preme court: and Ford Johnson. All
are Yale men and were on the last
car of the passenger train. It is not
believed any of them suffered serious
injury.

Pu' blishIniial
Issue ofChallenge
Radical Student Magazine, Fdted at
Columbia;, May -Receive
Faculty Celiso-shi~p
New. York, Feb. 22.-The first num-
ber of "Challenge" and the attitude of
its editors, Columbia and Barnard
students, toward prospective faculty
censorship seemed today to serve well
the title of the new radical intercol-
lege magazine which was organized
to stimulate the free discussion of
opinion among American students.
Chalenge" was out at noon today.
It was difficult to ascertain tonight,
however whether the faculty'of either
Columbia or Barnard College would
disapprove of the magazine and shack-
le it by censorship.
LUMSDIEN CONSCIOUS
IS LATESTr REPORT
At 3:00 o'clock this morn-
ing the supervising nurse at
University hospital reported
Lumsden, the injured student,
to be conscious and resting
comfortabl. A more thor-
ough examination of his in-
juries will be made some time
before noon.
ffegyin ?Iembership
CampaignTuesday
Thirteen Captains Will Have Charge
of Canvassing; Round-up
to End March 3
The Union life membership cam-
paign on the campus will be started
next Tuesday night at 6:30 o'clock
following a dinner for the entire body
of s.olicitors at 5:30 o'clock at the,
Union. The canvassing will ast for;
three days and will end March 2. The
leading team of 15 men will be givenI
another banquet at a later date.

SALE Of TICKETS
EOR UNION OPERA
TO BEGIN FRIDAY

Announce Program
For Band ounce
List of Entertainers Includes Some
of the Best Talent on
31101ig allCa' u
An announcement of the program
for "Michigan's Biggest Band Bounce"
was made yesterday afternoon. The
entire list of entertainers, and the acts
which are to appear in Hill auditorium
is as follows:
I. a "Ann Arbor University" March
Barnard

EACH
TO

STUDENT TO BE ALLOWED
PURCHASE SIX; HOPE
TO AVOID ERRORS

RESERVE TUESDAY FOR WOMEN
Life and Yearly Members of Union Are
Asked to Get Slips; General
Sale Next Wednesday
An official announcement was made
yesterday of the ticket sale for the
1916 Union opera, "Tres Rouge." The
sale will begin on Friday and con-
tinue until the following Wednesday.
Complications and mistakes as to
the ticket schedule and application
time can be avoided by a careful no-
tation of the complete schedule as
announced. Several changes have been
made this year to eliminate the sale
difficulties and to give the people the
best possible chances at the seats for
the five shows. This year the opera
will be given on March 15, 16, 17 and
18, including a matinee on Saturday,
March 18.
According to the present schedule
each person will be given an oppor-
tunity to purchase six tickets, which
(Continued on Page Six)
REVUE TICKETS GO
ON SALE TOMORROW
To Be Sold at Hill Auditorium, Ger-
nian-American and State Say-
ings Banks; Also by Mail
Tickets for the All-Nation Revue
will go on sale at Hill auditorium
tomorrow afternoon at 2:00 o'clock.
Following this opening of the box
l office, tickets can be procured on Fri-
day and Saturday from 9:00 to 5:00
o'clock at Hill Auditorium, and at
the German-American and State Sav-

(Written about 1890)
b Selections from "Chint

Chin"
Caryl

Varsity Band
II. - and Music"
L. B. Emerman; W. J. Kellar at the
piano

UNHEARD LOCOMOTIVE
SER I OISLY INJURES

H. M. LUMSIJEN,

III. "In old Japan"
Girls' Glee Club assisted by

HelenI

'19

Ely, Inez Gose and Louise Gould
IV. "War Marrh of the Priests"
Mendelssohn
Varsity Band
V. "La Revue da Campus" or "The
All-Campus Revue."
1, Beauty et Beast; 2, On the Level;
3, Alabis; 4, Purity Ball; 5, In Union
There Is Strength; 6, Preparedness;
7, Deliberations; 8, "La Revue des
mations." (Under the direction of
George M. Olsen)! 9, "When Night
Falls, Dear!'"
C. M. Burne, '17E, W. W. Dalzell,
(Continued on Page Six)
UIVERSITY PRESENTED
WITH VAGHANPORTRAIT
Preparedness for Nation Urged by
Colonel LaGarde in Address
on Founder's Day
Advocating preparedness for the na-
tion, Col. Louis A. LaGarde, U. S. A.,
delivered the Founders' Day address
on "The Dum Dum Myth," in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall last evening. Ste
reopticon views were shown of the
various kinds of guns and of the ef-
fects of various kinds of ammunition
on different parts of the body.
The speaker was introduced by

Peary And Wood
To Speak Tonight
"Preparedness" to Be the Joint Sub-
ject of the Two Representu-
tives of Defense
General Leonard Wood and Rear
Admiral Robert E. Peary will speak
upon the general subject of "Prepared-
ness" in Hill auditorium at 8:00
o'clock this evening.
Both men have entered into a care-
ful study of existing conditions and
appear here to express the result of
their researches, and to advance what
they consider advisable plans for the
United States to follow for national
protection. The lecture is the second
of the free series given under the
auspices of the local Nationaf Secur-
ity branch.
The two speakers will come from
Chicago together this afternoon, but
General Wood will continue to De-
troit, where he is scheduled to pre-
side at a meeting before returning to
Ann Arbor for the evening's speech.
Rear Admiral Peary is endeavoring
to perfect a system of aerial coast
patrol with the use of hydro-aero-
planes operating from stations
spacedat some .regular distances upon
our seaboard. He would form a net-
work of these flying boats on both the
Atlantic and Pacific, which in times
of war could be used as scouts to give
notification via wireless of an ene-
my's approach. and in times of peace
could be used to watch for derelicts.
WhAIT'S.GOING lON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity:
warmer with southwest winds.

Al TEMPT TO AVOID FREIGHT
TRAIN ; HIT BY FLYER
ON NEXT TRACK

ONE ISUNHURT
Emery T. Jones, Third Member of Trio
Returning from Tramp In Woods,
a Escapes Uninjured
DEAD STUDENT WAS ORPHAN
Is Survved by a Sister in Hemlock,
Mich., and a Brother in
Fort Worth, Texas
E Ibert S. Bryant, '19, of Sag- .
Inaw, was killed, and ft. Mason
Lumsden, '19, of Virden, ill., was
seriously injured when they were
struck by Michigan Central pas-
senger train Number 2 at the
curve near Barton dam at 3:40
"'elock yesterday afternoon.
Lumsden and Bryant, in company
with Emery T. Jones, '19, were re-
turning from a visit to the woods north
of the city. As they walked along
the tracks a freight,, train headed to-
ward Detroit came around the curve.
The trio stepped to the other track to
avoid it.and insdoing so found them-
selves directly in front of the swiftly
moving passenger train coming from
the opposite direction.
Jones Is Unhurt
Jones, who was not near the rails,
escaped uninjured. Lumsden, how-
ever, was walking near the track and
was struck on the arm and side. Bry-
ant, who was walking on one of
the rails, was carried about a hun-
dred feet and thrown to one side of
the track.
The train stopped and the two in-
jured students were put aboard. The.
crew then took them on to the depot.
Shortly after they were taken from the
train Bryant died. . Lumsden was re-
moved to the University hospital where.
an examination showed him to have
sustained a broken arm and internal
injuries. According to reports from
the physicians he will recover.
Both Students Orphans
Bryant, who lived at 531 Thompson,
and cane here from Saginaw, was an
orphan, as is Lumsden. He is sur-
vived by a sister living in Hemlock,
a town near Saginaw, and a brother
at present in Fort Worth, Texas. News
of Bryants death has been telegraphed
to his relations, but as yet no orders
have been received as to the disposi-
tion of his body. He entered the liter-
ary college last fall, with the inten-
tion of specializing in forestry.
Lumsden, who with Jones, roomed at
712 East Catherine, comes from Vir-
den, Ill., and has a brother in Chi-
cago. His guardian has been notified.
"We started out to take a long walk
at about 12:45 o'clock," declared Jones.
"We went into the woods the other
side of Barton dam. Both Bryant and
Lumsden were planning to enter the
forestry department, and were deeply
interested in nature. Bryant had a bag
of different kinds of moss over his
shoulder when the train struck him,
and that was the last thing I saw
when I looked back at the place after
(Continued on Page SIx)

TODAY
4:00 o'clock-John E.

Kellerd lec-I

ings banks, on Thursday, Friday and Dean Victor C. Vaughan as one whose tures on Shakespeare, U-Hall.
Saturday during banking hours. To name will go down in history as 7:00 o'clock-Meeting of the Forest-
avoid delay, tickets may be obtained one who played a great part in the ry club.
by mail order, the address being the Spanish-American war by introducing 7:00 o'clock-Fresh Glee and Man-
modern methods for taking care of the dolin Clubs meet, McMillan hall.
All Nation Revue, ill auditorium box wounded. 7 :30 o'clock-Prescott club meets,
office. After Colonel LaGarde's address, Dr. room 300, Chemical building.
SNo Fresh Engeerig Assembly Today G. Carl Huber formally presented to 8:00 o'clock-General Leonard Wood
the university the portrait of Dean and Rear Admiral R. E. Peary speak
There will be no fresh engineering Vaughan which was recently painted on Preparedness, Hill auditorium.
assembly today. Room 348 in the en- by Gari Melchers. Doctor Huber made Morning, afternoon and evening-~
gineeringt building will be used fr mention of several of the dean's ac- 'Short course in Highway Engineering,
the short course in Highway Engi- complishments, among which were his Engineering building.
neering which is now being conductedI leadership of the American. Medical as-___
by the College of Engineering. sociation, his instruction in the iedi- TOMORROIV
G - s cal school, service on the advisory 11:00 o'clock--Senior eng. assembly,
Gnerard, Ambassador, Hlas Aeceldenut board of marine hospital service, and West Physics hall.
Berlin, via wireless, Feb. 22.-James his many writings. The portrait was 4:0 --Seniorhlit class meeting, Tap-
W. Gerard, the American ambassador accepted in behalf of the board of re- pan hall.
fell yesterday while skating at Par- gents by Regent Junius E. Beal of Morning, afternoon and evening---
temkirchen, Bavaria, and broke his Ann Arbor, who also highly praised Short course in Highway Engineering,
left collar bone. (Continued on Page Six) Engineering building.

T

COL. LOUIS A. LAGARDE, U. S.A.
Who delivered the Founders' Day ad-
dress last night.

i. mm . i

Book by
11. i. P. JOhN and HAROLD
S'iiRADZ~il
Lyrics by
1'. A. P. JOHN
Music by
A. "I J. )RNE TZKY and C. S. LAWTON
P'roduction Under General Direction
of
CHAS. S. MORGAN, JR.

XANNO1"CING SE1T SALE FOR
Anmual University of Muchiugan Union Opera at
HILL AUDITORIUM BOXIE
Sale to Union Life Members begins Friday, Feb. 25, 9
A. M. to 5 P. M. and Saturday, Feb. 26, 9-12. Sale to Union
Yearly Members, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2 to 6 P. M., Monday,
Feb. 28, 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. and Tuesday, Feb. 29, 9 A. M. to
12 noon. Seat Sale to general public, Wednesday, March 1,
Hill Auditorium Box Office. Thereafter at the Whitney
Theater up to time of performance.

PRODUCED AlT
WHITNEY THEATRE
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIIDAY
NIGHTS
SATURDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
MARCH 13, 16, 17, 1S
PRICES: $2.00, $1.50, $1.00, Nhc

p

general
HILL' AUDITORIUM

T ONIGH T

Wood and Admiral'Peary

mommwmmm

Eight o'Clock

ADMISSION, FRE

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