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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ANNOUNCING OUR EXHIBIT
OF
Spring and Summ-r Suitings
From American and Foreign Sources in Artistic
and Striking Designs

,U

YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

G. H. WILD COMPANY

LEADING MERCHANT TAILORS

STATE ST.

:I>

Second Semester
TEXT BO K S
NEW and SECOND HAND
Drawing Instruments and Supplies
I. P. Loose Leaf Note Books

MicIGA'-N AI
Official newspaper at the University o
Mfichigan. Published ever y morning except
Monday durifg The university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $.5o. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students Supply
Store, The Delta, or. Packard and4State
Phones: business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Francis F. McKinney......Managing Editor
John S. Leonard..........Business Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester News Editor
Tom C. Reid...............telegraph Editor
Verne Burnett.............Telegraph Editor
1. 1'. Wright..................Sports Editor
J. C. B. Parker.......... Assignment Editor
Conrad N. Church.......... ...City Editor
Edwin A. Hyman...............City Editor
Lee Joslyn.....................City Editor
Irwin Johnson........Chr, Efficiency Board
Gordon D. Cooke.. ........tatistical Editor
Edward E. Mack........ Advertising Manager
IT, Eirk White.........Publication Manager
Y. R. Althseler.......Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers.............Accountant
C. T. Fishleigh ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
Leonard W. Nieter William F. Newton
Earl Pardee William I, Fort
Reporters
IT. A. Fitzgerald J. L. Stadeker
Waldo R. Yunt Golda Ginsberg
Martha Gray Nat Thompson
W. R. Atlas R. TI. McDonald
E. A. Baurgarth L. S. Thompson
Bruce Swaney ;. 1L. Ziegler
R. J. Blum C S. Huntley
Business Staff
Albert ~. Borne Roscoe Rans
r,. C. Musgrave F. M. Sutter
K. S. McColl L. WV. Kennedy
C. I?. Campbell D. WV. Shand
George Nobil
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1916.
Night Editor........Nat Thompson

STUDENTS BOOKSTORE

7 1
V. .

i

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
ian. local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:10 a.
. and hourly to 7:10 p. n., 9:10 p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
very two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
:48 P. m.,
Local Cars, Eastbound-5:35 a. 1n., 6:40 a. m.,'
;o5 a. m., and every two hours to 7:05 p. in.,
o5 p. M., 9:05 p. M., 10 :45 p. in. To Ypsi-
kni only, 8:48 a. m (daily except Sunday),
:2o a. mi.,12l:05 P."n, 6:o~ p. in, Ii 15 p.
.,1:15 a. m., 1:30 a. m.k
Local Cars, Westbound--6:12 a. m , 7:5o a.'
., and every two hours to 7:50 p. n., 10:20
"., i2 :2o a. in.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869
Caphal ............$ 300,000.00
Surplus......... $ 150,000.00
Resources over ....$3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches{
Main Office, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ-
ersity Avenue.
TATE AND GERMAN AMERICAN
SAVINGS BANK
Main & Washin gpn Sts.
Zesouroes, $2,500,000o00

We Have a
FULL LINE OF
COt Flowers and Plants
For All Occasions
COUSINS &HALL
I002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE
Phone 115

TYPEWRITERS

s

TYPEWRITING AND
SHORTHAND,
MIMEOGRAPHING
" kerything for the Typewriter"
0. D. M1ORRILL
(ov'r Iialtin're U.ncle)
S322 S. State St.

Coal Coke Lumber
Planing Mill Specialties
Interior Finishing
JNO. J. SAUER
SPhone 2484 310 W. Liberty

PAPER SALE,
All Dep rtment Paper
35c per Pounds Now 25c
SCHLEEDE

340 S. State

Your Choice of All
FALL SUITINGS

" AW

7......w.r
.

I

WAR RELIEF
The average American, especially if
he lives in an inland town like Ann
Arbor, has little conception of the vast
work that is being done in this coun-
try toward alleviating the suffering
of the sick and homeless persons in
those portions of Europe and Asia
made barren by the giant strugglings
of hostile armies. It needs only a
mere-skimming of the reports sent out
in the bulletins of the War Relief
Clearing House, and similar organiza-
tions, to realize what a mammoth
task humanity is called upon to face.
In the invaded provinces of France'
alone there is a population of 2,112,-
000 without clothes sufficient to en-
able them to withstand the rigors of
the winter, to which weakened con-
stitutions due to a lack of food make
theni peculiarly susceptible. Relief
organizations in Franee are trying to
care for 175,000 homeless and parent-
less children. The bulletin states that
they are "received in a shocking state
of filth; their clothing being in rags,:
and they are frequently suffering from
skin diseases." Cotton is needed to
stop the bleeding of the wounded men.
Medicines are needed for 60,000 con-
sumptives who have been evicted from
their homes with nothing except the
clothes which they happened to have
on at the time. The list of things
needed is interminable but the most
urgent need is for food, clothing and
medicines.
Michigan, so far, has been most
backward in her help, but there 'is yet
time to mend. Boxes on the campus
will take care of cash contributions,
and clothing and similar contributions
will be called for if word is sent to
Mrs. L. P. Hall.
OKLAHOMA UNIVERSITY HEAD IS
VISITOR ON MICHIGAN CAMPUS
Stratton D. Brooks, '96, president of
he University of Oklahoma as Norman,
Okla., was in the city yesterday visit-
ing the university as the guest of Wil-
Xred B. Shaw, '04, editor of The Michi-
gan Alumnus. After leaving the uni-
ersity, Mr. Brooks was superintendent
of public schools in Boston, Mass.,
for 10 years, when he assumed the
presidency of the Oklahoma institu-
tion, which office he has held for the
past four years.

Selected Editorial
WHO ARE THE LOWBROWS?
(New York Tribune)
We all know what a highbrow is,
but there seems to be some divergence
of view regarding the lowbrow. Dr.
David Starr Jordan has just explained
that a lowbrow is only one degree re-
moved from a roughneck, but at first
this will seem rather more confusing
than enlightening, since many of us
have been accustomed to using the
two terms, roughneck and lowbrow,
int-rchangeably. The good doctor even
reters to a large class of undergradu-
ates as lowbrows, and roughnecks, we
know, never go to college; they scorn
the very suggestion with an abysmal
contempt.
It is only too evident that most of us
have been classifying our brothers
with a lack of particularity amount-
ing almost to looseness. We have
been calling those lowbrows who were
simply roughnecks, and we have been
confusing social with intellectual op-
probrium. If Dr. Jordan's codifica-
tion of these epithets be accepted, the
lowbrow need suffer under no social
disability. He may simply be "too
practical," while the highbrow i "not
practical enough." In other words, the
lowbrow is he who is given to the
purely objective and concrete view of
things..i-He hasa fondness for the
immediate business in hand; he pre-
fers football to philosophy, the market
place to the library.
But if there are too many lowbrows
n college, so there are too many high-
brows. One highbrow is one too
many, if for no other reason than be-
cause he is a breeder of lowbrows.
Nothing makes one a 'lowbrow so
quickly as living with a highbrow.
And perhaps it works the other way
round, also; but since becoming a
highbrow is the more conscious reac-
tion of the two, it should be the more
easily controlled. We should suggest
that, whether in college or out, the
highbrows meet the lowbrows half
way and abolish forever the need of
frontal measurement.
Ferris lnstitIe Club Holds Banquet
Frris Inslitute club of the Univer-
sity of Michigan will hold its seventh
annual fanquet at the banquet hall,
Unitaran church, on Friday evening.
February 25. The club has an active
membership this year of about L 0.
Governor Ferris, Professor Masselink,
and others connected with that school,
are on the program. All former Fer-
ris Institute students are invited. Res-
<rvations may be made with L. W.
Lisle, president, 721 East Huron street.
Pres. Huteblins Speaks in Grand Rapids
President Harry 13. Hutchins speaks
before the Michigan alumni banquet
today in Grand Rapids. He will re-
turn to Ann Arbor tomorrow.
vomaen's Organizations
Owing to the Alumnae banquet in
l)troit, tbere N"ill be ro meeting of
the Board of Representatives of the
Women's League this morning. The
next meeting will be held the first
week in March.
Women who have been elected mem-
bers or officers of any campus organ-
ization, since the opening of the sec-
ond semester, should notify Frances
Way, '17, chairman of Committee on
Honor Points.

To meet Miss Leslie Blanchard, na-
tional secretary of the Y. W. C. A.,
who comes to Ann Arbor for the
Jubilee, the women of the Martha Cook
building will be at home to all col-
lege girls on Tuesday, February 23,
from 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Miss Evans' and Miss Wood's cotil-
lon will be distinctly informal in na-
ture and will follow immediately the
Athletic banquet, which takes place at
6:00 o'clock this evening.

MAN'S houseIh
A castie a'ihis pp's
a strong defense to keep
trouble an" gloom
the outside.
,. a 7715 151 |19
THE BEAUTY OF MY BUSINESS iS--
FOWERS
Visit my store and see. Rverytbing in Flowers--Daffodils,
Orcheds, Tulips, Narcissus, Violets, Sweet Peas, Roses, Carna-
tions and Lillies of the Valley.
Full Lime of Plants
MRS. FLANDERS Flower Shop
Phone 294 213 EAST LIBERTY ST RELT
A Complete Lino of
Drug Sundries, Kodekks
Candies, Perfumes
ALBERT MANN, Druggist
215 Sosth M4.2n St. An Arbor, Mick.

TEXT

BOOKS

Do you drive
winter?
You should.

an automobile in the

I

FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS

V eI

It's convenient.

New and Second-hand

Engineers' Supplies, Laboratory Outfits, Loose
Leaf Note Books, and Fountain Pens.
WAHRES
VNIVERSITY SOOK STORES

$3000
D, E. GRIENN AN
REAL CUSTOM TAILOR
606 E. LIBERTY STREET

You can heat your garage safely and
economically with a SAFETY GAS
GARAGE HEATER.
Approved by insurance companies.

Washtenaw Gas Co.

22

1

FACULTY MAN REFUSES OFFER
FROM EAST LANSING SCHOOL

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Fine Tailoring

Mr. Wilson, of the mechanical en-
gineering department, has denied the
rumor that lie is to accept a junior
professorship at M. A. C.
He has been offered the position of
junior professor of mechanical engi-
neering at the East Lansing institu-
tion, but has turned the offer down.
Rue Attends Pulp Makers Meetings
Prof. J. D. Rue, of the chemical en-
gineering department, has been at-
tending a convention of the American
Pulp and Paper Manufacturing asso-
ciation. Professor Rue is expected to
return tonight.

KOLLAUF, men's Tailor
Skilled and lotzg experience
on fine trade
Old Post Office Cor. Main & Ann
IHOSPITAL . NOTES I

a

I HORTHAND, TYPEWRITING
BOOKKEEPING
Instruction and Equipment
amnilton Business College
Stteand Williams Sis.
Dedicate Pages to Professor Siinderlhand
Two pages in the Micliganensian
were dedicated to Prof. E. R. Sunder-
land of the law school by unanimous
consent of the senior laws at a class
meeting yesterday afternoon, in ac-
cordance with the suggestion that some
popular and efficient member of the
law school faculty be represented in
the year boob by a cut and a short
biography. Professor Sunderland's
name was proposed and acted upon at
once, receiving a unanimous. vote.
K. M. Stevens, '16L, was elected
class orator at the same meeting.

DRIi. BUNT IN TO 1)DSCUSS TOOTH
PASTEB EFORE PRESCT'I'T CLUB
Dr. R. W. Bunting, secretary of the
Colege of Dental Surgery, will give
a discussion on tooth powders and
pastes and the care of the teeth at
7:0 o'clock Wednesday evening, Feb-
ruary 23, in room 303 of the chemistry
building.
The talk is given under the auspices
of the Prescott club of the college of
pharmacy and is oI)Q to the public.
A business meeting of the club will
follow the lecture.

We have found you

a shoe for early spring wear that
cannot be excelled---a light
weight Cordovan i n brown or
black that sells for seven dollars

a fry

Ernest B. Skaggs, '16, has been in
the hospital since Monday suffering
with quinsy.
Pei C. Yang, '18, was discharged
from the hospital -yesterday,'having
recovered from appendicitis.
Cornelius G. Baer, '16, is confined to
the contagious ward of the hospital.
On account of the decrease in the
number of calls, the health service
authorities have decided to discontinue
the Monday and Tuesday afternoon
office hours for men, but will con-
tinue to give attention to sick stu-
dents from 2:00 until 4:00 o'clock on
Fridays. The office will be open every
morning except Sunday from 9:00 to
11:00 o'clock.
Lester H. Bouquin, '16, Alvin D.
Maulbetsch, '18, and Wesley Bintz,
'16E, have been discharged from the
hospital.
Preparedness. We are showing
some catchy spring attire in 50c cra-
vats. The Davis Store, 119 So.
Main St.
Lyndon's for kodaks, films, finish-
tugs. Open Sundays, 9:30 to 4:30 only.

Only one Ann Arbor one
Store, Spring Showing $1.00,
$1.50 Dress skirts. The Davis
119 So. Main St.
Patronize Daily Advertizers.

Davis
$1.25,
Store.

WAGNER & COMPANY
STATE STREET
ESTABLISHED 1848

**

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