100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 16, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[IhI + THE MICHIGAN DAII Y

AMATO

AND

McCORMACK BILLED FOR

THE

MAY'

FESTIVAL

LONG ADITIONAL LIST
OF ARTISTS ANNOUNCED
FOR SPRING CONCERTS
"Samson and Delilah" and "Paradise
Lost," a :New Opera, to be Given
by University Choral Union
CHILDREN'S CHORUS TO GIVE
OPERA FROM PEN OF PIERNE
REINALD WERRENRATH APPEARS
IN PLACE OF THEODORE
HARRISON
Elaborate preparations are being
made for the twenty-third annual May
Festival, to be held in Hill auditor-
ium May 17-18-19-20.
The University Choral Union will
present two choral works; one, a
new work which has been performed
but once or twice in this country, en-
titled "Paradise Lost" by Bossi-the
other, a familiar opera, "Samson and
Delilah" by Saint-Sans, which will
be given with an all-star cast.
The Children's Chorus, which has
been a feature of the Festival for sev-
eral years, will appear in an elaborate
work from the pen of Pierne, entitled
"The Children at Bethlehem." This
concert will be given Fiday after-
noon.
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
of 70 men will take part in all con-
certs except the Saturday afternoon
concert which will be given on the big
organ.
The following artists have been en-
gaged:
Pasquale Amato, leading Baritone
of the Metropolitan Opera company.
who will appear Saturday evening.
Sophie Braslau, contralto of the
Metropolitan Opera company, who
will appear Thursday evening.
Frieda Hempel, leading coloratura
soprano of, the Metropolitan Opera
company, who will appear in a mis-
cellaneous program Wednesday even-
in..
Florence Hinkle, a popular oratorio
and concert singer, will be heard
thursday evening and Friday after-
noon.
Gustaf Holmquist, Bass, will sing
Thursday evening.
Ralph Kinder, acelebrated organ-
ist and composer, will give an organ
recital Saturday afternoon.
Morgan Kingston, Tenor, of the Cen-
tury Opera company, will appear Sat-
urday evening.
Marguerit, Matzenauer, Contralto
of the Metropolitan Opera company,
will take the part of "Delilah" Satur-
day 9evening.
John McCormack, the famous Irish
Tenor, who was unable to appear last
year on account of illness, will be the
attraction at the Friday evening con-
cert.,
Reinald Werrenrath, the distinguish-
ed Baritone, will appear Thursday
evening and Saturday evening.
Owing to a conflict of concert dates,
Mr. Theodore Harrison has been re-
leased from his Ann Arbor Festival
engagement in order that he may ap-
pear at the Spartanburg, South Caro-
lina Festival, an engagement made
some time before the date had been
definitely determined.
Mr. Werrenrath will take the part
which Mr. Harrison was to have had
while Mr. Gustaf Holmquist will have
the part originally allotted to Mr.
Werrenrath.
Marguerite Matzenauer, the leading
contralto of the Metropolitan Opera
company, will take the part of "De-

lilah" in the Saturday evening concert
instead of Schumann-Heink who has
declined to fulfill her contract.
Tickets may be ordered by mail on
and after Monday, March 6. All in-
quiries should be addressed to Charles
A. Sink, Secretary of the University
School of Music.
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS
WHO WISH TO STUDY ABROAD
American students desiring to go
abroad for study in Denmark, Sweden,
and Norway have been offered a lim-
ited number of scholarships by the
American Scandinavian Foundation.
These scholarships are not limited to
students of Scandinavian descent but
are open to all American students who
wish to take up the work. The sti-
pends average $500. A'pplication blanks
and further information may be ob-
tained upon inquiry to the American
Scandinavian Foundation, 25 West
Forty-fifth Street, New York, N. Y.
The Michigan Daily for the rest of

THE PIT
"Bl~ack as the Pit
From Pole to Pole"
HORATIUS AT THE BRIDGE
(Continued)
Then Maester Laertus Larson,
A scrapper fine ban he,
Say, "Ay skol standing on yure back,
But not on front, by yee!"
And old Herminius Hermanson-
He ban gude fighter, tu,
Say, "I skol taking little smash
At dese har Svedes vith yu!"
So ven dis Maester Porsena
Ban coming to big bridge gate,
He sees three husky lumberyacks
And know he come tu late.
But Lars, he ant ban qvitter,
He send 'bout saxteen men
To taking bridge,-by yiminy,
Dey ant come back again!
While old Horatius and his friends
Ban vatching bridge so gude,
Some aldermen on oder shore
Ban sawing planty vood.
Ay tal yu, ven dese boodlers
Ban start to tear tengs down,
Dar ant no better vorkers
Novere in whole dam town.
So ven dis bridge start falling,
loratius' friends yump back;
And he skol stand alone dar--
IHe ban brave lumberyack.
Then he yump intu Tiber,
And say, "Ay skol svim home!"
Dis bar ban how Horatus
Skol turn gude trick for Rome.
-Wm. E. Kirk.
No wonder the artists of the Ar-
menian Concert are musical. Their
names have to be given with slow
music,
See "The Birth of the Nation."
The Daily wonders what would hap-
pen if Alpha Phi Alpha applied for
admittance to the Inter-Fraternity
Conference. Tell 'em to come around
-we'll tell 'em
"Miss Xatherine Ketchum, '17, and
Harry Hawley, '13, were married in
Detroit
-Our Dilly Daily.
Who says there is nothing in a name?
And now the R. H. comes out with
an ad. which states "That two nega-
tives make a positive may be good
mathematics-." Yeh-and -mebbe it
isn't. Nor a lot of things, say we, with
gusto.
"To reduce Opera Try-outs Today."
-O. D. Daily.
They'll have to do considerable of
that before they are able to get into
those enclosures that they call ---
(censored).
* * *
But we'll confide with you to the
extent that it starts with a "c".
And ends with a "see".
If you're back there.
4' * A
When they grunt.
-By Gee.
ANN ARBOR STREET CARS
MAY HAVEH IR IKES
Tests to Be Made on Saturday Before
'Local Committee; Several D. U. R.
Officials Expected
The Detroit United Railway officials,

after several.weeks' delay due to the
illness of their attorney, have com-
pleted the arrangements for the dem-
onstration of the hand and air brake
street cars, and will send one of their
small sized cars equipped with an air
brake to Ann Arbor Saturday, Febru-
ary 19, when the members of the or-
dinance committee of the common
council will inspect the operation of
this new car; The demonstration will
take place at 10:00 o'clock.
The ordinance committee, which has
had the entire charge of this pro-
posed ordinance to force the D. U. R.
to use air brakes in the local cars,
consists of Charles A. Sink, chairman,
E. B. Manwaring, and Albert Lutz.
They brought up the plan several
months ago, but it has been held up
in its third and final reading because
of a petition by the car company for
an opportunity to display the advan-
tages of the cars now in use. Ber-
nard Weddock, lawyer for the D. U. R.,
was granted permission to give the
demonstration and he will personally
conduct the proceedings Saturday
morning, although several other offi-
cers of the company are expected to

FEW TICKETS REMIN
FOR DETROIT ARMENIAN
CONCERTON SUNDAY
Will Offer Same Numbers at Concert
in Hill Auditorium
Tomorrow Night
'DECIDE TO MAKE ANN ARBOR
PERFORMANCE POPULAR PRICED)
TWO ARMENAN PERFORMERS AR-
RIVE IN ANN ARBOR; BEING
ENTERTAINED
Practically all seats for the Ar-i
menian concert to be given at the Gar-
rick theatre, Detroit, next Sunday have
already been sold. Although this con-
cert is to be the same as that given
in Hill Auditorium Friday evening,
seats for the Detroit concert are sell-
ing for prices ranging from one dollar
to two and a half dollars, while the
Armenian Students' association has de_
cide to make Friday's a popular
priced concert, the prices ranging from
25 to 75 cents.
Aredis H. Koumjian, '16M, gave al-
interesting talk on Armenia at the
Church of Christ last night. He gave
a short review of the role Armenia has
played in history, especially in former
days. Stereopticon views were shown
of several of the towns and villages
now left desolate by the massacres and
deportations, At the end of his talk,
Koumian made an appeal for moral
and material support for his country
in her effort to survive.
- Mrs. Zabelle Panossian and Mr. A.
Shah-Mouradian, who are to take part
in the concert Friday evening, arrived
in Ann Arbor yesterday, and are being
entertained by the Armenian Students'
association,.
Mrs. Panossian is a prominent ly-
ric soprano of Boston who was secured
for this concert because of the excel-
lence of her rendition of Armenian
folk songs. Mrs. Panossian's voice
is said to be especially fitted for this
kind of music. Several of the folk
songs which she will render are sung
by the Armenian peasants at their fes-
tivities, and are believed to be hun-
dreds of years old, having been handed
down from generation to generationt
by mouth, and only recently written
down. One of 'the songs which she
will give Friday evening, "Groung,"
Mrs. Panossian learned from the lips
of her countrymen when she was yet
a small child in Armenia.
Miss Helen Humphreys, '16, presi-
dent of the Women's league, who has
charge of the sale of tickets in
the sororities, will appoint her assist-
ants today.
NEWS ABOUT IIChIGAN MEN
IN FEBRUAR Y ICIIIGANDER
Several interesting articles concern-
ing Michigan men and the doings of
the campus appear in the February
issue of the Michigander, a periodical
published under the auspices of the
University of Michigan Club of De-
troit.
"Michigan Men Who Break into
Print," an editorial written by A. L.
Weeks, '10, claims first place in the
magazine. Most of the men men-
tioned in this article have achieved
success in writing. Avery Hopwood
a well known dramatist, and Stewart
Edward White, a popular novelist, are
given greatest prominence in the edi-
torial.
Another article by F. M. Church,
'14, deals with the present athletic
boom at Michigan and the intended

purchase of an addition to Ferry field.
Other articles included reflect the
more important happenings of the
campus.
ALUMNUS GETS APPOINTMENT
FROM ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Duane H. Mosier, '13L, of Paw Paw,
Michigan, has been honored with an
appointment by Attorney General
Grant Fellows of Lansing to a position
in his office. Mosier served two years
as deputy county clerk after his grad-
uation from the Paw Paw high school
in 1906, and followed this with two
more years in the law office of Thomas
J. Cavaugh, after which he entered the
law department of the University of
Michigan.
Verein Meeting Postponed One Week
The general meeting of the German
Verein which was to have been held
this evening has been postponed until
one week fromt onight. The postpone-
ment was made necessary by the Y. W:
C. A. Jubilee, which is being held
this week.

At The Theaters
AT THE THEATERS *
* TODAY *
* _ _*
Arcade-Francis X. Bushman
gand Beverley ayne in "Pen- *
4'ningt on's Choice:,
* _____ 1
Majestic-E. P. Churchill Inc.*
presents "Around the Ton - *
* *
4' * *4 4* 4' * * * * * * * *

,

COUNCIL NAMES COMMITEES
tit; Aso on Firs: Escape V:si:li
Committees for the coming semester
will be appointed at the student coun-
cil meeting to be held this evening
in University hall at 7:15 o'clock. In
addition to routine business a report
will be made by Russell S. Collins, '16,
chairman of the connttee to look
into the sale of "Michigan" suihtase
labels, which the council eon~iders in-
advisable.
Fire escape facilities, particaly
from the third floor of fraternity
houses, have been examined by a coun-
cil committee chosen for that purpose,
and a report upon this matter will
also be handed in.
the year-$I 1141, 'Y
U-H''.r

FI$CE~t~ORCIIESTRAk TO PLAY
(onihiied ,v,, hllouvCand .Ilanjorine
TV nVv'Wil Fe vvreUnion Dance
The Union dance committee has se-
cured Fischer's saxaphone and ban-
O inc orchestra ior the special dance
to he given on the afternoon of Wash-
ington's birthday. The following men
comprise' the committee in charge of
he trrangemnnits: Robert Bridge, '16.
hairan ;iarry luell, '1tE; Morton
1ifliso, 'i6, and Charles Boos, '19.
M'. and Mrs. W. 0. Raymond and Mr.
nd rs. W. TI'. h arbour will be the
lemipeOies for this dance.
Thl~e reglar weekly dance this Sat-
rday night will be in charge of the
following committee: Abe Hart, '17,
vhairman; Robert M. Goodrich, '17L;
Harold B. Coulter, '18, and Forrest H.
Sw ee, '18E. Dr. Reuben Peterson and
Mrs. Peterson, and Prof. Emil Lorch
d rs Lorch will act as chaperones.

"Around the Town"
In presenting "Around the Town,"
the tabloid musical comedy which
comes to the Majestic theater for
three days starting tonight, E. P.
Churchill, Inc., the producers of this
latest musical comedy success, have
endeavored to surpass in the scenic
production anything heretofore offered
in the vaudeville theaters.
The first scene shows a sun par o
of Dr. Schlitz' Tangolitis Sanitarium;
the second scene is a parkway im-
mediately adjoining the sanitarium;
following this the Cafe De Cabaret, in
which a complete stage is shown upon
the stage. This set is probably one
of the most elaborate ever used in a
production of this kind, and in this
scene 25 people are used upon the
stage. The next scene shows a 25-
passenger Zeppelin dirigible balloon in
full flight in mid-air; said to be one
of the most novel and striking scenes
upon the stage today. From this the
audience is carried to the Palace du
Danse on the moon, in which scene
the entire company is seen to arrive in
the Zeppelin. Two 60-foot baggage
cars are required for the transporta-
tion of this production.
A complete crew of seven mechan-
ics are carried to handle the rapidly
changing scenes. Prominent in the
cast are Earle S. Dewey and Mabel
Rogers, two musical comedy favorites
of the vaudeville stage. Among the
others of the cast are Mr. Bruce
Richardson, Miss Alleen Morrison, Mr.
Lee Wilton, Mr. Harry C. Miller, and
,Mr. Thomas Keller.

The Michigan Daily the rest
year-$1.,0

of the
**

MRS. ZABEUJ . P OS'K'AN
lyric Soprana, of Boston, who will t h ar in the Armenian concert in
Ill Audit )rilunn n'icf iQW evenilin.

L

We have safety Deposit Boxes for rent NOW
in our BRANCH OFFICE.
Let Security, Service and Location be the de-
terming factors in selecting your banking con-
AnnrborSavingsBank
Organized 1869
Main Office N. W. Cor. Main and Huron
Branch Office 710 N. University
i Capital and Surplus - - - $475,000
Resources - - - - - $3,250,000

the year-$I

*

**I

i

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan