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February 16, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-16

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THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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NEW (~RKSUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 90.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1916. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1916.

RII'I1 Fi; CE.,

._...__

HALL MLL RELATE
EXPERIENCES WITH
AMVBULANCE CORPS
BROTHER OF STUDENT WHO LOST
L FE IN FRANCE TO SPEAK
AT UNION SUNDAY
TO SHOW STEREOPTICAN VIEWS

Student Enlis THIR UT LEAYES
With n TIDUTINCHORS
F. E. Kirkhan, of Jaimaica, Leaves '
Friday to Join 13411) Signal Corps;
BrenhersTiT 7FOR UNION OPERA1

f R

I

E rnest E. irkham, is8P, whose
home is in Jamaica, yesterday paid a L d Yi ~
visit to his friends in the College of NEEPS
Pharmacy and bid them good-bye
preparatory to leaving for Ontario, 0
Canada, where he will enlist in the
Canadian contingent for the war. ORCHESTRA

I T Y INVESTIGATION
OTHER NAMES.
FF LISTS
sTRYOUTS SOON

Purpose Is to Interest Students
Project of Maintaining Corps
in War Territory

in

Louis P. Hall, Jr., just lately re-
turned from the front in Alsace Lor-
raine, where he has been driving an
ambulance, will speak at the. Unioi
next Sunday afternoon on the
work of the American Ambulance in
the war zone. He will draw in par-
ticular upon his own experiences there,
rand illustrate his talk with stereopti-
con slides made from pictures he took
while serving in France.
President Barry B. Hutchins will
preside at the meeting, which will be
held at the Union at 4:00 o'clock, and
the entire arrangements have been
.made to allow the speaker the best of
opportunities to get his message be-
fore the university students.
In addition to presenting his own
experiences to entertain his hearers,
Hall will deliver an appeal for cam-
ptas aid along the lines that he has
been working on. Though not direct-
ing his entire speech into these lines,
the purpose is to start a propaganda
on the Michigan campus to secure
money for the purchase' of ambulances
to be sent to Europe for work there.
Four of the Michigan professors are
behind the idea in that they are en-
thusiastic for the campus to do this
and have been working with Hall to
arouse the campus enthusiasm.
"Every large Eastern university,"
said Mr. Hall, "is represented on the
battle front of Europe with at least
one ambulance. Harvard and Yale
have considerably more than one. Even
Vassar and Wellesley have secured
money to send their representative
ambulances to Europe for this good
work, Some smaller schools, such as
St. Paul and Middlesex, have also sent
over an ambulance, Dartmouth is
(Continued on Page SIx)
LETTER EADS POLICE TO
SEEK CHEF IN NEW YORK
Note to Paper Offers Clues; Chicago,
Anarchiiss Decry Attempts
to Discredit Themd
New York, Feb. 16.-Jean Crones,
the Chicago club chef accused of put-
ting arsenic in the soup served to 200
guests at the banquet in honor of Arch-
bishop Mundelin, is believed by the
police to be in or near New York.
The reason for the search is a let-
ter signed by Crones and bearing evi-
dence of having been written by him
and telling about himself and prac-
tically confessing to handling poison.
This letter which was received by a
horning newspaper was turning over
to the police and immediately pre-
sented clues on which the police are
working!
pIschuim Connection With Crime
Chicago, Feb. 16.-Anarchists of Chi-
cago issued a statement today in con-
nection with the poisoning of the soupl
at the Mundelin banquet last Thursday4
Might in which they condemned, as]
anarchists, the efforts to discredit the1
ttrarchist movement, At the same time,]
the police announce that conclusive1
evidence has been obtained that thel
poisoning -was the result of a ploti
participated in by more than one per-I
son,

Mr. Kirkham, after a year's absence
from the university, had intended to C-s1.and ('horns Rehearsals Will Be
enroll for the second semester in the hld =itrii Rehean Uni
College of Pharmacy. Instead, he will Held at Michigan Union
join the 134th Signal Corps of the Today
Canadian -army next Friday for active The third cut of the Union Opera
service with the allies.Ththr tofheUinOra
srice itha thallis. r s chorus was made yesterday afternoon
Mr.trkham has two brothers now trafter the rehearsal held at the Union.
A total of 32 men still remain on the
list and it is probable that the major-
7W SFity of these will take part in the final
production.
Favors Tra iing The list is as follows:
A. V. Livingston, '18E, F. C. Van
Brunt, '18E, P. B. Maher, '18A, Gor-
Representatives of Nine Large Medical don Campbell, '17E, Willard Huss, '18,
t olleges Support Tactical Drill at A. . Kirkpatrick, '18, W. G. Brownlee,
Chicago Meeting '18, Harold Loud, '18E, H. P. Nichol-
-- son, '18, B. R. Clark, '18, J. S. Burrows,
At the Conference on Medical Educa- '17E, Nat Robins, '18A, A. D. Mott,
tion held in Chicago last week, repre- '17E, C. F, Remington, '18, L. F. Berry,
sentatives from the medical colleges of '18E, B. R. Penniman, '18, R. H. Ben-
nine of the largest universities in the nett, '18, R. W. Harbert, '17, H. B. Mc-
country voted to train the men in Callum, '18, F. H. Tinsman, '16, H. S.
their colleges for military service. Bohling, '18, H. S. Hatch, '18, R. H.
This will include instruction in treat- Leslie, '17, E. P. Smith, '18, Ray Glei-
ing the wounds of war, camp sanita- chauf, '16, 1. Kinsey, '16, B. T. Pab,
tion, and training for the ambulance '16, Harold Easley, '16, Frank Willard,
corps. The universities in which this '18, M. R. Palin, '17, W. G. Brownrigg,
will become effective are Harvard, '17, E. H. Hleimann, '18.

II

1
1
i

Yale, Johns H-opins, Pennsylvania,
Minnesota, California, Leland-Stanford,
Chicago, and Michigan.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan and Dr.
Charles W. Edmunds represented Mich-
igan at this conference..Dean Vaughan
read a paper before the conference.
on "The Minimum Requirements for
Admission to Medical Schools.
Canadian Officer.
Speaks at Union

Ma or Tolmie of Domiiion
Talks to Canadian Club
Tonight

Arny

Major J. C. Tolmie of Windsor, Can-
ada, will be the principal speaker at
the Canadian club banquet which will
be held at the Union at 6:30 o'clock
this evening.
The toastmaster of the evening will
be Raye C. Eastman, '17A. Toasts will
be responded to by Dr. H. H. Cum-
mings of the health service, Profs.
Mackavanagh and H. S. Shepperd of
the engineering college, and Ivan N.
Cuthbert, grad, president of the organ-
ization.
Major Tolmie is one of Canada's
prominent man. He was a member of
the Canadian pa'liament until recently
when he resigned his seat in order to
go to the front. He will probably
leave some time in March. His ad-
dress will deal with present conditions
in the Dominion,
Duaniels iforbids
Officer to Speak
refuses to Allow Rear Admiral Fiske
to Address American Defense
Society in New York
New York, Feb. 16.-Rear-Admiral
Bradley A, Fiske will not speak at the
luncheon of the national committee
of the American Defense society at the
Hotel Biltmore February 22. A letter
from Secretary of the Navy Daniels
has been received by the society, re-
fusing to permit Admiral Fiske to de-
liver an address on the ground that the
inclusion of political discussion with
the functions of a naval officer cannot
but be detrimental to the navy.

In addition to this list there are a
few tryouts whose eligibilities are
still undetermined and their names
will be added as soon as the commit-
tee finds out their scholastic standing.
Dick Gardner, '17E, who was assist-
ant stage manager, has been appointed
chief electrician to take the place of
H. H. lumiston, '16E, who has left
college.
Orchestra tryouts will be held in a
few days, and those who intend to try
out are requested to be ready. This
year the members of the orchestra
will be eligible for the Mimes and will
take the trip as' heretofore. A cast
rehearsal will be held at 4:00 o'clock,
and a chorus rehearsal at 7:00 o'clock
(('olitiueti on Page Six)
EXPERIENCED COMEDIN
TO JOINBAND BOUNCE
L. B. Einerman,'18L, Billed to Produce
Original Scotch, Irish and
Oriental Ballads
Another addition has been made to
the list of big scale attractions to be
staged at the coming Band Bounce.
It is in the form of a character come-
dian with a wealth of experience be-
hind him: L. B. Emerman, '18L, for
six years before the public with a rep-
ertoire of songs and dancel, will fur-
nish this act.
Scotch, Irish and Oriental songs
have been Emermuan's specialties and
in preparation for the event whicr is
to take place in Hill auditorium Thttrs-
day evening, February 24, he is expect-
ed to produce some original ballads
depicting the humorous traits of these
nationalities.
At the first general rehearsal of
"The All Campus Revue" held Tues-
day night, the various take-offs were
found to combine cleverly into a uni-
fied whole. Among the various sa-
tires is one upon the senior class, an-
other concerning the engineers, one
about the student council and one on
military training.
A second general rehearsal of "Re-
viie" will be held on Saturday after-
noon at 2:00 o'clock in University hall.
It will be in connection with the band
rehearsal to be held at that time.

Alumnus Honored
B .y Belgian King
1)r. C. L. Gillett, '011), Honored fo
Work in Belgium; Is Member of
Xi Psi Phi Fraternity
Word was received here yesterday
that Dr. G. L. Gillett, '01D, at present
in Belgium, has received from King
Albert the decoration of "Chevalier de
la Couronne de Belgique" for distin-
guished services to the Belgian people
during the war.
This information comes in a com-
munication to The Michigan Daily
from Mr. W. H. Cilliers, dated Jan-
uary 22, at Glasgow, Scotland. The
letter, in part, follows:
"Your readers may be interested to
hear of a foreign distinction won by
an old Michigan man,
"Dr. G. L. Gillett, of London, Eng.,
formerly of New York City, has been
honored by the king of the Belgians
with the decoration of Chevalier de la
Couronne de Belgique for services ren-
dered to the Belgian army."
Dr. Gillett, after graduation from the
dental college of the university in 1901,
returned to New York, where he re-
sided a short time before going to
England. Soon after the outbreak of
the war, he joined the English relief
corps for work in Belgium, and since
that time has been with the Belgian
army. While in the university Dr.
Gillett was a member of Xi Psi Phi
fraternity.
COSMOPOLITANS PLAN
Send Letters to Countrymen to Arouse
Interest in All-Nation Revue;
Hold Meeting Tonight
Planning to interest the leading
men of foreign nationalities who are
in the United States in "La Revue des
Nations," William Robertson, presi-
dent of the Cosmopolitan club, has
called a meeting of that organization
for 8:00 o'clock this evening in Mc-
Millan hall, at which each nationality
will write a joint signature letter to
the most prominent members of their
nation in this country, calling their
attention to the importance of this
movement which has as its basis the
foundation of a loan fund for foreign
students.
At present there is no means by
which foreigners enrolled here can be
aided in financial difficulties except by
petitions to the faculty for a post-
ponement of tuition payment, and
while the university officials are glad
to co-operate with these students, the
system is unsatisfactory. All pro-
ceeds from "La Revue des Nations"
will be placed under the supervision
of a committee composed of faculty
members and officers of the Cosmo-
politan club in order that foreigners
who are in need of help may obtain it.
CLAIM CLEAR CASE AGAINST
ACCUSED WISCONSIN STUDENT
Chicago, Feb. 16.-Back to the bot-
tle or poison vial which contained the
drug that killed Marian Lambert came
the case for and against William Orpet
late today.
Harry Beardsley, a detective. arrived
in Waukeegan this afternoon and made
the positive statement that the state
case against Orpet was complete save
for the bottle,
On the bottle, or the lack of it,
James H. Wilkcrson, former United
Stites district attorney here, who will

be chief counsel for Orpet, bases his
hone of freeing the collegian of the
murder ch-rge.
Classical Club Lecture at 7:15 Tonight
Through an error the lecture which
Prof. G. H. Allen will give before the
Classical club tonight, was announced
for 8:15 o'clock. The lecture will be-
gin promptly at 7:15 o'clock in Room A
of Memorial hall.

LIT STUDENTS, ATTENTION!
All students in 'theliterr
college who wish to drol sub-
jects or make changes in their
elections imist do so today or
tomorrow at the office of the
Registrar. Blanks for the pur.-
pose may be secured there. No
changes can be made after to.,
morrow without special perm1Q.
Sion*

S0Y, FERRIS SPEAK
.AT UNIONSERICES
State Executive to Talk Sunday Night
Under Auspices of Pres.
byterian Church
SUBJECT NOT YET ANNOUNCED
Gov. Woodbridge N. Ferris will
speak in Hill auditorium at 7:30
o'clock Sunday evening at the Union
church services under the auspices of
the First Presbyterian church.
Although the subject of Governor
erris' address has not been announced
it is known that he will bring an im-
portant message to university men
and women.
Governor Ferris has spoken in Ann
Arbor on numerous occasions and his
visits here have always been an inno-
vation in student life. His personality
and ability as an orator make him one
of the country's strongest speakers.
It is expected that Pres. Hry B.
Hutchins will introduce Goveror Fer-
ris to the audience, despite the fact
that the speaker is well-known on the
campus. The subject of the lecture
will be given out the last of this week.
As a special feature for the Sunday
meeting, the Choral Union will furnish
the musical program under the direc-
tion of Prof. A. A. Stanley of the school
of music.
WilAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity
-Fair with fresh south winds.
TODAY
Canadian club banquet, 6:30 o'clock,
Michigan Union.
Girls' section of the Deutscher Ve-I
rein meeting, 7:00 o'clock, Deutscherl
Verein rooms.
Cosmopolitan club meets, McMillan
hall, 7:00 o'clock.
Susan B. Anthony tea at Sorosis
House, 4:00 o'clock.
Meeting of Senior Architects at 5:00
o'clock in room 312, New Engineering
building.
Prof. Allen lectures to Classical
Club, room A, Memorial Hall, 7:15
o'clock.
Freshman class group leaders, room
1, old Eng. building, 7:00 o'clock.
Technic staff smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:15 o'clock.-
Geneva Club meets, Delta Gamma
house, 7:30 o'clock.
TOHORROW
Kentucky Club smoker , 7:30
o'clock.
Webster Society meets, Webster
hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Jeffersonian society meets, Jefferson
hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Armenian Concert, Hill Auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.f

FALL OF ERIERUM. FORTRE SOF
TURKISH CAUCASV US RY, TO MEN
OF czAR, UOFFCILYREOT

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x=
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PETIaGH1A D)CLIMSlTHAT NID
OF UOW~SFORTS hAV
BRITISH TO NAME PEACE TERM
CWimiauy Pi'otesh Suppression by
S. Naval Censor of Wireless
to Say yule
London, Feb. 16-Erzerum, the grey
Armcuian fortress of the main Turkic
Caucasus army, estihated at 160,00
is reported by Renter's Petrograd co:
respondent to have fallen into th
hands of the Russians.
'le actual captiure is not official]
con firmigd, although the latest Russia
olicial report says that seven mou
forVf at Erzera have been taken
this a king a total of nine.
The actual ful of Erzerum is sti
doubted here M view of the repeate
previous unottli reports of its cat
t're which later proved untrue.
( 'oSESou Menber eMak Peace MoI
Laodon. Feb. 17. Peace terms ac
ceptabl to th government were aske
tod-iu the house of commons by
motion of C i .rles 1. 'revelyan, Lib
eral member from Yorkshire.

M. Tirevelyun gave notice of his
mtion calling for the announcement
by the goo r!nent of the general
terms on which the government would
enter negotiations leading to a just
ad latng pcaas
An _ ernational tribunal for the
settlement of all diplomatic disputes
was nrgcd by Arth ir Ponsonby, an-
other Liberal member, in an amend-
ment to the address i reply to the
kings speech. in all Z5 amendments
to ,he re;Ily have been offered in the
~Hohse Of connuons.
(i'ins Obget to Wireless Censor'ship
Washington, Feb. 16.-Action on the
rt o" L A ┬░ercan naval censor at
the Says il. wvive'ss station in sup-
pressing an official announcement by
the German admiralty of the reported
destruction of the British cruiser Ara-
his in the North s a on February 11,
kt idnieed 4t1 Pagie 2ix)
SIXTEEN SHUW PERFECT
Eighl Aen tuhl EiglAt : O1:) fl lw ve All
"A" Vrades; Last Year's Record
InIih s Decras
Of the 3,000 students now enrolled
in the Literary collega just 16, eiht
men and eight women, were lucky
enough to recceve A"_ " grades insevery
subject caurried during the first se-
nester.
Of these eight are seniors, two ju-
niors, four sophomoresand the class
of 1919 boasts two. This year's show-
ing seem to indicate a falling-off in
scholarship since last .er at this time
exactly twice the present number had
received lpertect records.
Th names of tilose who received all
"A" grades are as follows:
W. T. Adams, '17, Detroit, Mildred
Bachers, '1, Port Huron, Raymond
Barnard, '1G, Detroit, Leavitt J. Bulk-
ley, 17, Deroit, Ella M. Caninmell, '111
Mn Arbor. Bernard H. Dawson, 'lG,
La Pt , Argentina, Erwin E. Dreese,
'9, .\unson, Edwa<l 13. Grpham, '1
In'lin 'ton, Ta, Alvm J1 MeAndless,
'16. Capaca S. Pond, '18, Bradford,
Iass., Stanford Rothschild, '1. Bal-
tmonA Md., Margaret S. Schunity. '19,
Inn Arbor, Olga Shinman, '17, Grand
Raps, Grace Thomasmian '1Q, Grand
Rapis. Muriel Tipton, '16, Floradale,
Penn., Ross . Walker, '18. Battle
sreEk.

5C

"40 Yards of Trench", depicting the horrors and glories of the War,
featuring Morrison Wood Arthur Sachs, and
a galaxy of Campus Headliners will be one of the eight features which will be seen at the
Coing

Auditorium
Thursday
24th

BA

D

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