100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 16, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rl

C

E ,iT E I)AILAYI
-NI; ,1, F TE WORLD AND
I isLCAMPUS

f"'"""' gym. w........ w w .r+
2
lmrGAN

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TEL E1G APll SERVICE BY 'THE
NEW YORK SUN

I

U

. ---

VOL. XXVI. No. 89.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ADMINISTRATION
SCORED BY ROOT
IN PARTY SPEECH
EX-SE N A TORt ST ARTS JIEPUBLI.
f"AN 'AIMPAI(GN IN NEW
YORK~ -ADDIRESS
ThREE ERRORS ARE OUTINED
Speaker Promises to Remedy Present
Falt if Republican Power
!ls Restored
New York, Feb. 15.-Mr. Elihu Root
fired the opening gun in the national
Republican campaign in his speech
last night as elaiminan of the New York
state convCUtion. He assailed the
Democri4,, regime of the past three
yearn for haviatg failed in tariff, Mex-
ican and European problems. He pre-
sented the aims of the Republican
party as chiefly the establishment of
an adequate protective tariff, military
preparedness and a fearless foreign
policy.
Mr. Root, in reviewing the Mexican
question, stated that the present ' ad-
ministration, through misplaced sen-
timent, intervened in Mexico upon a
pretext for the purpose of driving
Hluerta out of power. "We have failed
in Mexico,"'lie. said. "With the occu-
(('ontinned on Page Six)
BRITISH PROCLAMAT91IONMg
- oireigners L1iable to Arrest if They
Approach Within Ten Mles
of {toast
New York, Feb. 15.--That the British
government has issued a proclamation
forbidding aliens from approaching to
within 10f mhiles of the coast line of
England was the substance of an in-
teresting bit of itncensored news
brought to this port'today by Arthur
T. Waterfall, a banker of Detroit, who
was a passenger on the St. Paul, of
the Americau line.
Mr. Waterfall said that the author-
ities were notifying alien born resi-
dents to vacate the "reserve" strip
of land when he left. The proclama-
tion, he said, was due to go into effect
February 19, after which any foreign-
er, whether naturalized or not, will be
subject to arrest, when found near the
coast. The precaution, according to
the banker, was taken as a means of
curtailing the activities of German
spies who might seek to supply sub-
marines with information.
Choral Union Jshers to Report Friday
All regular choral union ushers
have been asked to report at Hill
auditorium Friday evening for the
Armenian benefit concert.

To Reduce Opera
Try-Outs Today
Tres Rouge to Be Given in IIChieagoi at
Auditorium on Evening of
The third cut in the cast and chorus
of the 1916 Union opera, Tres Rouge,
will be made at the two rehearsals to
be held today. The cast is scheduled
to meet at Harris hall at 7:00 o'clock
tonight, while the chorus will meet
at the Union at 4:00 o'clock this aft-
ernoon.
The date and place of the Chicago
presentation has been decided upon,
and the show will be given in the Au-
ditorium on March 25. The men in
charge of the opera, feel that the Au-
ditorium will furnish the show with
better stage facilities than did the
Orchestra hall last year.
pThe scenery for the opera, which is
now being built in Detroit, promises
to be the best that any Union opera
has ever had. Mr. Morgan visited
Detroit yesterday and stated that the
artists will haye the scenery com-
pleted in a very short time.
Col. La Garde To
Speak Six limes~
Arny Officer Will Lecture This Week
r and on Founders' Day
Colonel Louis LaGarde, U. S. A.,
who has been secured as the speaker
for the Founders' Day exercises net
Tuesday, which will celebrate the 65th
anniversary of the founding of the
Medical school, will deliver six lec-
tures while in Ann Arbor. He will
arrive in Ann Arbor Thursday, anl
will deliver one lecture Friday, two
on Saturday, and two on Monday, be-
sides speaking at the Founders' Day
exercises.
Besides the speech of Colonel La-
Garde, the Founders' Day exercises
will be marked by the presentation to
the university of the portrait of Dean
Victor C. Vaughan, which was painted
recently by Car Melchers. This por-
trait is the gift of alumni of the Medi-
cal School and other friends of Dean
Vaughan.
Says Slain Girl
Knew of Poison
Lawyer for Orpet Denies That Marian'
Lainbert Was Murdered
Chicago, Feb. 15.-The lawyer for
William Orpet, the University of Wis-
consin student held for murder . at
Waukegan, will set up as one of the
mainstays of his defense the allega-
tion that Marian Lambert knew two
weeks before she died of poison in
the woods at the edge of Lake Forest
that she was not in a condition that
threatened disgrace.
It has been the theory of the state
that Orpet murdered the girl, giving
her cyanide of potassium on the pre-
tense that it was medicine meant to
relieve her condition. It is the con-
tention of the defense that if Miss
Lambert knew she 1-as. all right, it is
unreasonable to believe Orpet could
have persuaded her to take the fatal
draught.
T"" Book Exchange Needs Volumes
Urgent calls for additional books
;ave been made by the "Y" book ex-
change. The association can dispose
of at least 300 more volumes. The

WILSON ANDAID91S
REHCONSiDER CASE
OF MERCHANTMEIN
ADMINIST RATION ) E C II) F S TO
OPPOSE GERMAN CON-
IEN rO N
SHIPS MAY ARM FOR DEFENSE

President Remains in Washington
Anticipation of Further
Developments

i l

Washington, Feb. 15.-President Wil-
son and his advisors have reconsid-
ered the proposition of departing from
the letter of established international
law and subscribing to the German
and Austrian contention that armed
enemy merchantmen are to be regard-
ed as auxiliary warships and not en-
titled as such to warning before at-
tack. That is to say, if the entente
powers do not accept the proposal of
the United States for the establishment
of a "modus vivendi" under which all
merchant vessels will be disarmed, the
United States will stand by the law
that such ships may arm for defense
and still retain their charter of peace-
ful vessels of trade.
Anticipating important international
developments, President Wilson has
given up his proposed "swing around
the circle" in behalf of the prepared-
'ness policy of the administration. He
has become convinced that the next
few months will have a direct bear-
ing on the foreign relations of this
country after the war is over.
It is also understood that tie Presi-
dent is anxiously awaiting the report
of Colonel E. M. House, who has been
spending several weeks in Europe in
an attempt to learn the true sentiment
of the belligerent powers toward the
United States.,
UNION GIVES DANCE FEB. 22

"easure Reduces
Required Points
B~achelor of Arts Degree to Be Given
in Future to Those Having
but 120 P~onts
A measure reducing the number of
points required for the degree of
Bachelor of Arts from 135 to 120 was
passed by the faculty at a meeting
held on the evening of January 31. It
was ratified by the regents last Friday
and will go into effect immediately.
Hereafter the first sentence under
the heading "Requirements for Grad-
uation" on. page 22 of the announce-
ment of the literary college will read
thus: "The degree of Bachelor of Arts
is conferred upon students who have
earned one hundred twenty hours of
credit (together with one hundred
twenty points)."
In addition to this measure another
was adopted which will change the
reading of rule 4 in the literary an-
nouncement, and provide for the ap-
pearance upon the diploma of the
words "with high distinction," "with
distinction," or special mention in a
particular subject according to the
character of the work done by the
graduating student.
To receive "high distinction" a stu-
dent must earn 45 hours of "A" grade,
and the rest of the work done in resi-
dence must have an average of "B".
"Distinction" will be given those who
earn 15 hours of "A" and who main-
tain an average of "B" in the rest of
the work done in residence.
NAME SPECIAL TICKET
SELLERS FOR CONCERT

}

Prof.

BRITISH SUFFER FURTHER LOSSES
BEFORHE LATST 6ERMAN OFFENSIVE
MOVEMENT OUN WESENWAR FRONT

Aiqouni, VIlolinist, Will
Part in Armenian
Program

Take

Special W silgton Birthday
W ill Be Featured

Party

The dance committee of the Union
has decided to give a dance on the
afternoon of Washington's birthday,
February 22, from 2:30 until 5:30
o'clock. The orchestra will be the best
that Ike Fischer can furnish and
tickets will be sold at the usual price.
This dance will be given in addition
to the regular Saturday night dances,
and will be the first effort of the new
chairman in the way of feature af-
fairs.
Tickets for this week's Saturday
night dance will go on sale at five
o'clock tomorrow afternoon, while
those for the special dance will be
placed on sale at five o'clock Friday,
both sales being subject to the new
rules of the Union dances.
Mr. Wani Talks on "Aux Balkans"
"Aux Balkans" was the subject of
a lecture in French Mr. Harry Wann
delivered yesterday afternoon before
the members of the Cercle Francais in
Tappan hall. The lecture was illus-
trated with stereopticon views, some of
which were made from photographs
taken by Mr. Wann during a two
weeks' trip which he took from Con-
stantinople to Venice in the summ er
of 1910.

Harry G. Gault, '17L, president of
the Michigan Union, yesterday an-
nounced the appointment of the follow-
ing committee to sell tickets for the
A.'imenian concert which is to be given
Friday evening: F. M. Adams, '17,
W.,R. Atlas, '18, C. F. Boqs, '18, T. S.
Cox, '17, D. E. Gardner, '17E, H. L.
Humphreys, '16, N. N. Ibsen, '18E,
J. F. Jordan, '16, A. T. Lehman, '17,
G. C .Mack, '18, W. Peddicord, '16L,
S. Pratt, '18E, N. F. Smallpage, '18, J.
Schermerhorn, '18, H. B. Sturtevant,
'17, H. R. Wasson, '18, and E. L. Zeig-
ler, '18.
The ticket sale at Wahr's was opened
yesterday and many tickets were dis-
posed of. The sale will be carried on
at Wahr's for the remaining three days
from 3:00 to 6:00 o'clock, and at the
Y. M. C. A. all afternoon.
Prof. Krikor Aiqouni, of Syracuse,
the violinist who has been secured for
the concert, is a native Armenian
whose work has been divided between
composition and concert work. Just
before the present war broke out he
had undertaken extensive work in
the arrangement of Armenian folk
songs to introduce Armenian music
into the musical world. Two of these
arrangements will be rendered by Miss
Rose Hagopian, soprano, Friday even-
ing.
Professor Aiquoni will play two of
his own compositions which demon-
strate the result of oriental emotions
and occidental technique. His beau-
tiful choral fugus, "O Lord Our God,
(Continned on Page Six)

Score of Miners
Are Suffocated
Fire Breaks Out ini Montana Mine;
Cause of Disaster Ulnknown
by Company
Butte, Mont., Feb. 15.--At least 21
men were killed by suffocation by
fire which broke out on the 1200-foot
level of the Pennsylvania mine, one of
the Anaconda properties, last night.
About 220 men were in the mine at
the time, but all others got out safely,
although several were overcome by gas.
The cause of the fire has not been
ascertained, but officers of the com-
pany deny that the fire burned in
through to the Pennsylvana from some
outbreak of fire from adjoining prop-
erties.
NE YORK ALUMNI AID
MICHI6ANUNION FUND
Assembly of 223 Graduates Gather in
Unique Meeting at Annual
Banquet Feb. 4
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* "Just a TOUCH of Sentiment" *
* I......... ............ *
* being of sound mind and real- *
* izing all I owe to my university, *
* add to my pledge already made *
* the sum of $......for the Mich- *
* igan Union. If I have not al- *
* ready blessed myself with giving *
* I subscribe .... dollars worth of *
loyalty, happiness and brother- *
* ly spirit. *
* *
* * * * * * *'* * * * * *
To the solemn music of an organ,°
envelopes upon which the above was
printed were passed out to the 223
Michigan alumni assembled in New
York at the annual meeting of the
New York University of Michigan club
on February 4.
The procedure was the culmination
of one of the most unique gatherings
of Michigan alumni ever assembled.
The banquet hall, in the center of
which was hung a huge painting of
the proposed new Union building, was
decorated to suit the occasion.
Between courses there were thrown
(Continued on Piage Six)
WHAI'S GOING ON ~
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity
- Cloudy and warmer; southerly
winds.
TODAY
3:00 o'clock-Mr. Makielski lectures
on art. Alumni Memorial hall.
8:00 o'clock-Saginaw club smoker,
Michigan Union.
1x:00 o'clock-Tau Beta Pi dinner,
Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock--Mortar Board meeting,
Kappa Alpha Theta house.
7:15 o'clock-Fresh Glee club prac-
tice, McMillan hall.
7:30 o'clok-Wyvern meets, Pi Beta
Pi house.I
TOMORROW
0:30 o'clock--Canadian club banquet,
Michigan Union."
7:00 o'clock-Girls' section of the
Deutscher Verein meeting, Deutscher
Verein rooms.!
8:15 o'clock-Professor Allen lec-
tures, Room A, Alumni Memorial hall.
7:00 o'*lock-- Cosmopolitan clubI
i meets, McMillan hall.

SCENE

ENGLISH ALSO LOSE IN EAST
Leave 500 Dead on Mesopotamia Field
According to Latest
Reports
London, Feb. 15.-The German offen-
sive in the west, which has been felt
in Champagne and in the region to
the north of Arras, was shifted yes-
terday to the section southeast of
Ypres held by the British. At this
point, the German official statement
announces successes on a front of
800 meters, or nearly half a mile.
The German statement announces
that one officer and dozens of men
were taken prisoners. The British of-
ficial statement says that the trenches
taken covered a front of about 600
yards.
British Again Lose Near Kut
London, Feb. 15. A Turkish war of-
fice report received here tonight tells
of a new serious setbak suffered by
the British in Mesopotamia. The re-
port adds greatly to the anxiety felt
for many weeks concerning the actual
status of the campaign. This latest
defeat, according to Constantinople,
was suffered by the second British re-
lief force despatched to the aid of the
main British army bottled up in Kut
el-Amara.
400 English Dead Left to Turks
Constantinople, Feb. 15.-About 500
British dead were left on the field in
a battle at Bathia-mar-Krua, Meso-
potamia, says an official announce-
ment issued today. "The British fled.
leaving all their camp necessities to
the Turks," the report adds.
Cermacns Completing Serb Railway
Paris, Feb. 15,u-The Germans are
directing the construction of a strat-
egically important railway line' from
Uskub to Monastir by way of Krasevo.
The ine is almost completed, accord-
ing to a dispatch to the Temps.
STOUFFER RHETURNS TO
ID ALL NATION REUE
Numbers Presented by Outside Talent
Now Being Arranged for
Presentation
Aubrey Stouffer who is in charge of
the staging of the All Nation Revue,
returned yesterday to take up 'his
work after a week spent' in Chicago
making arrangements for the scenery.
Six different numbers went through
their acts under Stouffer's guidance
yesterday, and today seven more will
do so.
The numbers which are to be brought
in from outside are also being finally
arranged. Albertina Rasch, premier
danseuse of the Metropolitan Opera
company, who is to do several solo
dances, is having an entirely new set
of costumes made, and the orchestra
of 40 pieces which is to accompany
her is preparing the music.
Dorothy (longer of Detroit who, with
four of her pupils, is to stage the
Greek dance, discussed plans for her
portion of the program with William
]H. Fort, Jr., '16, general manager of
the production, in Detroit on Saturday.
Members of the famous Toots Paka
troupe of musicians will appear in
'Ann Arbor early to participate in the
final practices of the Hawaiian sketch.
In all, there are 17 short acts which
are connected by a single theme and
reach their climax just before the final
curtain falls upon the entire cast of
nearly 250 people.

OF TE UTONIC ThRUST
S8IF'4S TO YPRES
RE (4ON

per-
lill

ook department will be open eac hay
this week from 10:00 to 12:00 o'clock
in the morning and 3:00 to 6:00 o'clock
in the afternoon.
Pres. Itutchins Is Detroit Speaker
President Harry B. Hutchins yes-
terday spoke on "The University" be
fore the Detroit Board. of Commerce
at its luncheon. On Saturday he will
talk at the annual dinner of the Grand
Rapids alumni association.

Normal Concert Course
YPSILANTI
Piano Recital by Percy Grainger
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, at 8:00 P. M.
Program
I. Dour Organ Choral Vorspide - - - - - Bach-Basoni
II. Prelude, aria et final - - - - - - - Cesar Franck
III. Compositions by Grieg, and Folk Music arranged by Grainger
IV. Paraphrase, waltz from "Nuteracker" Suite. Tchaikovelay-Grainger
Reserved Seats to All Parts of the House $1.00

PROF. lihl'R AIQIONI
Violinist, of yr'ucuse, who will
fermI at the Armenian concert in
A ud itorium Fn y Ituilnkg.

DOES

THIS

INTEREST

YOU?

BA

D

BOU

CE

HILL

AUDITORIUM,

FEB.

24th

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan