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February 15, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH'IE 1ALY
NEWlS OF Till' WORLD AND
THE CAN PUS

4 1UI I
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Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business ?IO
TELEGR APll SERVICE BY TB
NEW YORK SUN

Of

-- - - _ __ _ __ ,....._.u

TOL.XXV1i No. ~

PRICE FIVE CENT

ANN ARBOR, MICHICAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1916.

i

_"

KIN L NGS
TI1 , i " LECTURER iN SERIES ON
"PREPA R E lNESS" OPPOSES
SOVERE 1(NTY
WOOD AND PEARY TO SPEAK
e f'lg ASppro yes disolutionl Favoring
Protection of V. S. Rights
and Property
Advocating a federation of all Eng-
lish speaking peoples under a con-
stitution coniparable to that of the
United States, in order to oppose the
doctrine of sovereignty held by Euro-
pean nations, Darwin P. Kingsley,
president of the New York Life Insur-
ance company, contrasted democracy
with sovereignty i his speech before
150 i People fiN Hill auditorium last
night. "The Trilogy of Democracy"
was Mr. Kingsley's subject and his
talk, which was based upon an elab-
or ate comparison between ancient
Creek and tragedies and modern con-
ditions, was the first of a series of
free lectures on "Preparedness" un-
(er the auspices of the Ann Arbor
b)ranch of the National Security league.
"The doctrines of sovereignty and
the principles of democracy cannot
exisi in the same world," declared the
TICETS SELL[RAPIDLY
FOR ARENIAN ONERT
To Put up Banner on State Stree

Give Out Name
01/1916 Opera,
"T~res ilouge" to Ble Official Titlie of
This Year's Student
Production
"Tres Rouge" is the name of the
1916 Michigan Union opera, according
to an official announcement made yes-
terday by those in charge. The opera
is the product of W. A. P. John,.'16,
and H3. A. Schradzki, '15L.
The play centers about three red-
haired girls, which fact furnishes the
basis for the title. The first act is
laid at a summer home in Newport,
while the second act is a fancy dress
ball at the same place.
A rehearsal of the chorus and cast
parts was held yesterday afternoon,
under the direction of Mr. Morgan.
The cast rehearsal last night con-
sisted chiefly in going over recent
changes made in the lines. Another
chorus rehearsal will be held at the
Union at 7:00 o'clock tonight, and all
tryouts are urged to be present. The
cast will rehearse at 4:00 o'clock to-
day.
Director Morgan expects to go to
Detroit today to look after the scenery
now being made. Formal announce-
nient of the trip, cast, and chorus per-
sonnel will be made in a few days.
Extend Time Ifor
Year JookPhotos

_ _ _ _ _._ e . __ . __

AIM TO snt P FT
TO RENDER SEIECTIONS
ON HARP
GIRLS GLEE 018 TO PERFORM

ri'0

Stage - Noel Act, "The Al-dmpus0
Rvue," Ridiculing Studenpts
and Faculty

Buin~ ess

Staff of Michlganensian De-
cides to Allow Five
More Days

The business staff of the Michigan-
ensian announces that, owing to the
disturbing elements of semester ex-
aminations and a short vacation, an
extension of five days has been ar-
ranged, during which time seniors
may have sittings for year-book pic-

o iunian to Talk at Church tures.
of C hrit Tomorrow This period, which is from the 15th
to the 20th of this month, represents
Tickets are selling rapidly for the p sitively-the last opportunity afforded
concert to be given in Hill auditorium seniors to arrange for Michiganen-
Friday evening for the benefit of the sian pictures. Photographers report
Armenian war sufferers. A banner will that quite a number of seniors have
be put up on State street today an- not had sittings, and as yet have made
nouncing the event. Aredis H. Koun- no arrangements for them.
jian, '16M, will talk on conditions in
Armenia at the Church of Christ at 3landolin 'ub Not to Meet Tonight
7:30 o'clock tomorrow evening. The There will be no meeting of the
tickets are now on sale at Wahr's ev- Mandolin club this evening, but the
ery afternoon from 2:00 to 5:00 organization will meet at the cus-
(Coidinudi' on Page Six) tomary time on Thursday evening.

Every precaution is being taken to
have the various acts for the com-
ing Band Bounce in a high state of
perfection when the big scale pro-
duction appears in Hill auditorium on
Thursday evening, February 24. All
the numbers for the evening are al-
ready well on their way towards con-
(Continued on Page Six)
INVESTIATE "ATTEMPT
TO WRECK M®.TIN
Passenger Train as Miraculous Fs.
cale When Workman Has Train
Signalled
Chicago, Feb. 14.-An investigation
of what may have been an attempt to
wreck the Detroit night express, a
Michigan Central passenger train car-
rying more than 300 passengers, has
been begun by the police of Hammond,
Ind.
Tae train had a miraculous escape at
10 o'clock Sunday night when it stop-
ped only a few feet from a switch
locked with a heavy brake-beam.
The train was stopped only by the
qui k action of the tower man, who
was notified of the defect by a work-
ian who rushed to the tower just
as the train was approaching. The
train ran almost past the tower when
the engineer saw the signal and threw
on his emergency brake. So far as
could be ascertained, none of the pas-
sengers were injured by the sudden
stop.
SAYS THIAT CITY HAS RIGHT TO
PUiMP WATER ON STE E FARM
Judge E. D. Kinne recently ruled
that the city of Ann Arbor can not
be deprived of its right to pump water,
from its wells on the Steere farm and
refused to enjoin the city on the pe-
tition of Gustave Schenk, a farmer
whose lands adjoin the Steere farm.
In an effort to obtain a pure water
supply, the city has been conducting
tests at the Steere farm and Schenk
charged that the tests have caused his
wells to go dry.
It was also held by Judgb Kinne
that the city is liable for damages if
its action deprives neighboring lands
of water and he assessed damages of
$100 against the city in favor of Mr.
Schenk. The case will be carried to
the supreme court.
Kneeland Unable to Return to School
Tracy Kneeland, '18, who was called
home the latter part of last semeste:

Inspect U.S. Ship
In N eutral Water
(erm1ans.Board Standard 0,1lSi Car.
rig C(argo o Bezine and
IPetroleu m I
EXPEC' PROTEST TO BE MADE
Copenhagen, Feb. 14.-The Standard
Oil tank ship Moreen, flying the Ameri-
can flag and bound from New York
to Copenhagen with a cargo of ben-
zine and petroleum, was accosted and
inspected by a German torpedo boat
February 5.
According to a statement by Capt.
Wheeler of the Moreen, his vessel
reached port at dusk and was met by
customs house officers. After their
inspection the crew began unloading,
a part of the cargo of benzine into
fighters; at 10 o'clock while this work
was going on a torpedo boat slipped
up alongside.
"This is an American ship, and we
are i.n neutral waters," protested Cap-
tain Wheeler, to no avail.
"I wish to see youropapers as well
as any wireless messages you received
en route," insisted the German officer.
Captain Wheeler complied with the
demands. The officer inspected them
and departed. A protest against board-
ing the Moreen in neutral waters is
expected to be made through the
American consul-general in this city.
Nane Torrey Invitation Chairman
Arthur H. Torrey, '16, has been ap-
pointed chairman of the invitation
committee of the senior literary class
for this year.
WAN TO GIVE LECTURE,
"Aux BALKANS," TODAY
'alk in French Will Be Fourth on Cer-.
ele Francais Program; To Be
Illustrated
Mr. Harry V. Wann of the French
department will give the fourth lec-
ture on the Cercle Francais program
in Tappan hall lecture room at 5:00
o'clock this afternoon.
The subject of the lecture, which will
occupy about 45 minutes, will be "Aux
Balkans." The entire address, which
will be in French and will be illus-
trated with .35 lantern slides, some
of which were made from photographs
taken by Mr. Warn himself. Mr. Wann
will confine his remarks for the most
part to Montenegro and the Dalma-
tian coast. In the summer of 1910 he
spent two weeks in that country while
on his way from Constantinople to
Switzerland.
This is the lecture which was orig-
inally announced for February 8, but
due to the fact that this date occurred
during the examination period it was
decided to postpone it until the open-
ing of the second semester.
ALPHA NU ELECTS OFFICERS
Choose C. E. Bailey, '17, President, and
A mtsbuechler Vice-Presidnt

GERMANY ANDAUSTRIA CONENTRATE
TROOPS T4 10 CMPEL ROUMANIA TO
S REMAIN NEUTRAiL- THOU1G.HUT W

>:
*,
4w'
.*

sion fee will
dents.

REGENTS OVU

:
*

FOR STUDENT D I
Pass Resolution s for Voluntary MIi-I
lary Tlrain1Iig lit

MichigaR
MIL I' RY V

W. J. BRYAN IS 111
SPEAK RIERE AGAIN
William Jennings Bryan,
former Secretary of State, will
speak in Hill auditorium on Sat--
urday night, March 11, under
auspices of the student. Y. M.
C. A. He has not yet announced
the subject of his address.
The "Y" hopes to make the
meeting an open affair and in
order to make it -possible for all
to attend, practically no admis-

bec harged stu-

170 IF .XMCIL

SERV('lE

Non-compulsory military instruc-
tion for Michigan students was au-
thorized at a recent meeting of the
Board of Regents and a committee
composed of the President, the Deans
of the Colleges and Schools of the
University, and two members of the
Board of Regents was appointed to
work out a satisfactory plan along
the lines provided for in the following
list of resolutions:
Whereas, We 'recognize that the
preparation of its students for the
performance of their duties as citi-
zens of the state and nation is one
of the most important functions of
this University, and recognizing that
the performance of such duties may
involve service in the defense of the
nation, it is
Resolved, That suitable opportunity
be given to the male students of the
University of Michigan for military
instruction which instruction, how-
ever, shall in no case be compulsory,
but shall be given to such students as
may voluntarily elect 'the same.
It is further Resolved, That a chair
of Military Science be established at
the University which shall be occu-
pied by an army officer with the title
of Professor of Military Science, to be
selected under conditions and in man-
ner satisfactory to the United eStates
Government and this Board, and that
a course of study be prepared which
shall be designated "The Course in
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON

* ~* :: * 4' .~, * * * * 4: *
*

STRIVE TO P110TOKE CABINET
CRISIS T4) (ET PRO-GERMAN
PREMIER
BULGARIA SWERVES TO ALLIES?
No Conlir'imaton of Report That Bul'
gari is Seeking Separate Peace
With Entente Powers
Rome, Feb. 14.-According to con-
fidential information available here,
Germany, previous to leaving Saloniki
and resuming the offensive on the
western and eastern fronts, decided to
try to compel Roumania to remain
neutral throughout the war.
Bulgarian troops are being secretly
concentrated on the Roumanian fron-
tier along the Danube, where Austrian
amid German soldiers are also being
concentrated. When this concentra-
tion is concl'uded Germany is expected
to demand formal assurances of Ron-
mania's neutrality, besides insisting
upon the demobilization of the Rou-
manian army. She will probably re-
sort to the occupation of the Ron-
manian frontiers, at the same time
promising to restore them after the
war.
Meanwhile, Germany is striving to
provoke a cabinet crisis in Roumania,
with the object of having a pro-Ger-
man premier replace the present gov-
ernment, which is suspected of being
favorable to the Allies.
Germans Try to Cow 11oumanians
London, Feb. 14.-There appeared
today no confirmation of yesterday's
unornial report from Athens that Bul-
gari is seeking separate peace with
the Allies.
The actual military situation in the
Balkan theatres of war, Macedonia and
Albania remains stationary, while "be-
hind the screen" preparations for a
sudden military stroke are very
marked.
All eyes are again turned eagerly
toward Roumania where the Kaiser's
special emissary has planned a rigor-
ous campaign, the substance of which
may be summed up in the threat,-"If
Roumania does not join the central
powers shortly she will suffer for it.
The Tpeutonic empires know how to
strike hard at the earliest moment."
Thus far, however, the Teutonic pro-
pagant(ia has failed to make any verl
great impression on Roumania. Mean-
while the Austrian and Bulgarian in-
vading armies are in Albania, the for-
mer threatening Durazzo and the lat-
ter Ablona. They have made no sub-
stantial headway toward actual at-
tack on the Adria-tic seaboard.
Bulgaria Mmay Swerve in Allegiance
London, Feb. 14.-The Evening Stan-
dard learned from its Athens corres
pondent today that definite negotia
tions hae been opened for a changE
of policy on the part of Bulgaria wbiel
will incline her to the side of the
Allies.

Alpha Nu Literary society has elect-
ed C. E. Bailey, '17, president for this
semester. T. E. Arntsbuechler, '16, was

by the death of his father, has been chosen vice-president, E. E. Dreese,
unable to return to the university this '19, secretary, H. H. Chapman, '18,
semester. Kneeland while in the uni- treasurer, C. A. Reid, '17, Sibyl Editor,
versity was a reporter on The Michi- W. S. Adams, '17, representative on
an Daily. the Oratorical Board.

Weather for Ann Arbor and Vicimi-
ity-Fair and warmer; fresh south
and southwest winds.
TODAY
3:00 to 5:00 o'clock-Tryouts for
Junior Girls' play, Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall.
5:00 o'clock--Mr. Harry V. Wann
lectures, Tappan hall, "Aux Balkans."
7:00 o'clock-Meeting of the S. A. E.
Engineering society rooms, engineer-
ing building.1
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of Adelphi,
rooms, U-Hall.
TOMORROW
3:00 o'clock--Mr. Makielski lectures
on art, Alumni Memorial hall.
8:00 o'clock-Saginaw club smoker,
Michigan Union.

200 COPIES OF GARCOYLE LEF
liLt A rey 13(isposed of 1100 Cphi
of Last Edition
The J-Hop and Valentine numbe
of tile Gargoyle, which appeared b
tween semesters proved to be fully a
great a success as the Military Trai
iug nuiber. The sale of all but tw
hundred out of an edition of 13
copies sets a new high level for Ga
goyle circulation.
In order to give those .who we
absent between semesters an oppc
tunity to secure copies, these 200 cc
ies. will be placed on sale this more
ing at tables provided for the purpo
in the library and engineering buil
ings.

i

3&S ROSE JIAGOPIAN
Soprano, of New York Ciy, Who Will Appear in the Armenian Concert
Hill Auditorium Friday Evening.

The ouig Nomen's Christian As-ociation will be fifty years old on
March 3, )i. Michigan women will celebrate from February 15 through
V"br iiViliams. lve national secretaries, other outside speakers, will
be here to help celebrate .
This eveiug, 7 :3 o'clock, at Newberry hall, a unique program will
le given. The Symphonic League Glee Club will furnish the music. All
Michigan women are invited..
Begining with February 16, running on through to February 27, will
be a series of parlor meetings i4 all of the sororities, dormitories and league

IL
721 Colleges and Universities
Celebrate
houses; At all of these parlor! meetings outside speakers will be the guests
of honor.
Tuesday, February 22, frothii to io'clock, at Newberry Hall, a recep-
tion will be given by the members of the Advisory Board of the Young Wo-
men's Christian Associati,)n.
The two Jubilee Vesper Services, namely those of February 16 and
February' 23, will be in charge of Dr. George W. Knepper, of this city, and
Miss Leslie Blanchard, of New York City. The music at both these Vesper
Services willi e furnished by the Symphonic League Glee Club.
Saturday afternoon, February 26. te three hundred and fifty young

women who are not residing in sororities, dormitories or league houses, will
be entertained at Newherry Residence laill to meet Miss Gogin.
The final grand wind-up of the Jubilee Ce e1ra mn will be in Hill Audi-
torium Sunday night, Vebruary 27, 7 :30 'lck. kislp Wiliamns is the
speaker of the evening. Music furished 1 IiUiiversity of Michigan Glee
Club..-
Miss Helen Tuthill is chairman of the Jubilee Committee. All prepara-
tory work is w(:ll in hand. The twelve days' celebration promises to be of
unusual interest from beginning to encl. The University of Michigan is
sure to stand among the first in the land when it comes to her Jubile
Program.

I
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