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October 13, 1915 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILI

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CHANRED LINEUP
FAES MARIETTA
IN TODYSAME
(Continued from Page One)
In spite of the fact that the Var-
sity has a regularly scheduled contest
booked for today, the coach staged a
scrimmage last night. Several of the
first string men were missing, and
the scrubs held the Varsity to three
touchdowns, putting up stiff opposi-
tion all the way. "Buzz" Catlett was
the particular star of the afternoon,
skirting ends with the same speed
that he has always displayed, and
dodging as effectively as ever. He
scored the first touchdown for the
Varsity. With the ball on the 35-yard
line, "Buzz" shot around left end,
lighting his way through a maze of
tacklers and going over the line.
"Bill" Cochran kicked goal.
"Pat" Smith scoredthe second
touchdown, while Zeiger registered
the third and last. Cochran convert-
ed the second into the seven-point
limit with a pretty goal. No one
tried for a goal following the third,
and the score stood 20 to 0. Harry
Calvin, playing half for the Varsity,
did some effective line plunging,
ploughing through center several
times for sizable advances.
Nothing in particular is known con-
cerning the strength of the Marietta
aggregation, but the coach does not
expect to experience much trouble in
routing today's opponents.
The Varsity lined up as follows in
yesterday's scrimmage with the
scrubs:
Whalen, l. e.; Warner-Pobanz, 1. t.;
Boyd-Rehor, 1. g.;rHowe-Warner, c
Cochran, r. g.; Norton, r. t.; Hldner,
r. e.; Roehm-Zeiger, q. b.; Calvin, 1.
h. b.; Catlett; r. h. b.; Smith-Roehm,
1. b.f
CLA FOOT BAL
APPEAS POPULAR
Representatives of Several Classes
Engage in Scrimmage and
Early Practice
SCHEDULE TO BE POSTED SOON
Class football nearly overshadowed
Varsity scrimmage yesterday in point
of interest and number of men en-
gaged in work. The fresh engineers
held scrimmage, showing td advan-
tage in falling on the ball. The senior
engineers met mainly to get used to
the ball.
It appears that the big trouble in
getting teams out to work is that the
classes have not yet elected managers
and no time for practice has been
set. All classes are urged to hold
elections and make arrangements for
workouts. Managers of the various
teams should report to Director Rowe
at his office as soon as 4pey are elect-
ed in order that regul ractice may
be arranged. A copy of the schedule
will probably appear within a few
days.
Pre-schedule dope indicaites : that
campus honors will"fall betweenthe
senior laws, the junior lits, junior en-
gineers, and the niedcs. Rivalry be-

tween the senior laws and the junior
lits is especially keen on account of
the close game won by the latter last
fall which decided the campus cham-
pionship. Both teams will be com-
posed of men who have played to-
gether for at least two years, and the
game between them should afford
much interest.
Prospects fora good season are ex-
cellent, due to the many veterans who
have signified their intention of com-
ing out.
New York Club Takes New Name
Akhenaton society will henceforth
be the name of what was form-
erly the New York State club, as de-
cided at a recent meeting of that or-
ganization. Its home is located at 517
East Ann street.

HERE GOES CATLETT ARMOUND MT. UNION'S END

ATHLETIC BOARD PLANS
FR DEFINITE SYSTEM
OF 'M" CHEER-LEADERS
Comnittee Appointed to Investigate
Methods Employed by Other
Larger Colleges
EARL PARDEE, '17, RE I AS
ASSISTANT FOOTBALL IMANAGER
HOLD MASS MEETINGS ONLY BE-
FORE M. A. C. AND COR-
NELL GAMES
That cheer-leaders .for Varsity
games should be selected upon a new
basis was the decision reached in yes-
terday's meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the athletic association. In
the past, there has been no set rule
for regulating the choosing of men for
this position. and it has been left to

the discretion of the boaird to pick
those whom it thought most fitted.
This plan has not Proviedl entirely
satisfactory, and it is now felt that
a definite system should be outlined
to provide for the training of new men
in the business of leading yells, so
that Michigan will never be left with-
out efficient and experienced cheer-
leaders.
With a view to obtaining the expe-
rience of other large universities, a
conumittee has been appointed to in-
vestigate the syste- ., employed in
eastern colleges which have organ-
ized cheering. t - Ii3e7: report, the
board will take steps to adopt what
then appears to be the most feasible
plan.
The following men have consented
to assist Hal Smith in leading the
cheering today and in future games
during the football season, until some
definite arrangement is made: George
Labadie, lit spec; Waldemar A. John,
'16; Robert Bennett, '18, and John R.
Watkins, '15-'17L.
The resignation of Earl Pardee. '17.

as assistant# Varsity football mana
was acceptedI. Pardee now hold
position in thie o~tices of the athl
association. He stated that he fe
would be embarrassing to retain
offices, and deemed it advisable to
der his resignation to the board.
leaves but three assistants to the i
ball inanager, and no one will be
pointed at this late date to fill
vacancy.
The matter of mass meetings
came under the attention of the be
and it was decided that, owing to
difficulty in obtaining Hill auditor-
meetings would be held only be
the M. A. C. and Cornell games.
committee appointed to arrange
mass meetings has not yet comple
details as to the method of ticket
ribution.
OVER0ATS
and rain coats from the House
IKulppenheimuer, on sale by N. F. A
Co.. MaIn street. oct6eod-v

Photo by Daines & Nickels..

AMERICAN CHAMP'ION
DEFEAT PHILLIES FOR
THIRD SUCCESSIVE DAY
Battle on Same Order as Former Ones
Except That Both Teams Hit
Much Freer
MORAN HOPES TO WIN WHEN HIS
TEAM PLAYS AT HOME TODAY
BREAKS IN LUCK FALL TO BOS-
TONIANS WHO SCORE
TWICE
Boston, Mass., Oct. 12.-(Special.)-
For the third time in three successive
days, the Boston American league
champions defeated the Phillies by a
score of 2 to 1.
It was a battle on the same order
that the teams have staged on former
days, but the hitting was freer in this
game than it has been previously. The
Phillies got to Shore, whom they beat
in the first game, for nine hits, while
Chalmers, who went the route for the
Quakers, yielded eight blows.
With the series moving back to
Philadelphia tomorrow, Manager Mo-
ran has not given up hope. But the
most optimistic of the National
league team's followers is feeling
somewhat blue tonight. Boston needs
but one game to annex the title, while
the Philly team must capture the next
three or be declared the losers. Gro-
ver Cleveland Alexander will probably
work for Moran as a last resort in
tomorrow's game.
T.he breaks of the luck were all with
Boston today and Manager Carrigan
may thank his stars that the game is
counted won. Several different turns
of fortune and Chalmers would have
been the victor over the lanky Ernest
Shore. But then it is simply a case
of luck being with the better team.
Boston scored first. In the third in-
ning, Barry walked and Cady put him
on second with a single. Shore sacri-
ficed, Stock to Luderus. Harry Hooper
singled, scoring Barry, but Chalmers
disposed of the next two with ease.
Philadelphia lost opportunities in the
first, second, fourth, sixth and sev-
enth innings through inability to get
men around after they had got on the
bases.
Overalls for shop work. Wagner &
Co., State St. Oct13-14

FIRST DA9Y Of TENNIS
PLY CLOSES WITHOUT
ANY SPECTACUR WORK
Authorities to Default Any Games in
First Round Matches That
Remain Unplayed
CRAWFORD, SWITZER AND
OTHER CAMPUS STARS WIN
NONE OF MATCHES GO TO THIRD
SET FOR DECISION AND ALL
SETS UNDER TEN GAMES
Matches in the fall -tennis tourna-
ment proved to be more or less unin-
thresting yesterday afternoon. Not
one went to a third set and all sets
were finished before ten games had
been played. It is imperative that all
matches in the preliminary and first
round matches be played before to-
night. If in any case this ruling iis
not complied with, the authoities will
default the match.
Perhaps the reason for the uneven
scores yesterday lies in the fact that
there were many of the known stars
of thecampus appearing in the play.
Both Crawford and Switzer of the
Varsity were on"deck, in addition to
Codd, Oster and the two Steketees.
These men won their matches handi-
ly and their showing was more than
gratifying to the followers of the
racket sport at Michigan.
The results of the matches were as
follows:
Ohlmaker defeated Powell, 6-1, 6-3;
Codd defeated Brawer, 6-0, 6-2; Craw-
ford defeated Borland, 6-1, 6-3; Oster
defeated Hart, 6-1, 6-2; Beal defeated
Arnold, 6-2, 6-0; Trost defeated Stru-
zer, 6-2, 6-3; P. Steketee defeated
Reicpert, 6-1, 6-0; E. Steketee defeated
Leibbers, 6-2, 6-1; Crockett defeated
Brooks, 6-3, 6-1; Switzer defeated
Kirkpatrick, 6-2, 6-0; P. Hart defeated
L. Goldsmith, 6-1, 6-2.
Clinical Society Will Meet Tonight
Dr. D. G. Darling, Dr. John Sher-
rick, Dr. William Lyon and Dr. A. S.
Hulbert will speak before the regular
monthly, meeting of the Clinical so-
ciety at 7:30 o'clock this evening in
the ampitheatre of the university hos-
pital. The annual election of officers
will be held, followed by a dinner at
the Internes' home.

rr

LET US SAY

-- 0
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A Ivy'
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that when you buy clothes of Tom
CORBETT you buy clothes of the
HIGHEST CHARACTER. Clothes that are
tailored to perfection--clothes that hold their
shape, and look good as long as you care to wear
them. G I am showing a wonderful assortment
of suits and overcoats in the most wanted models
and fabrics.
rop in at my establishment and
see these garments for yourself.
T OMCOECLOTHES FOR
YOUNG MEN

III

116 East Liberty Street

Ann Arbor

U

FOLLOWING THE YOST-MEN
By Hal Fitzgerald

Remember now, when the game's
over, that the exits were put there
for a purpose and not as ornaments.
Cheerleader Smith politely re-
quests that all rooters sit in the south
stand this afternoon, so that the vocal
forces will not be divided.
And thus as much as five whole con-
secutive days have passed without
any conflicting reports as to whether
Catlett was going to stay with the
team or pass up football.
When Coach Yost puts Rehor in
the lineup, the average weight per
man on the line advances some nine
pounds, which startling distinction is
one that but few can claim.
Coach Yost had four quarterbacks
operating in the backfield last night.

Calvin and Catlett were at the two
halfback positions, Roehm was at full,
and Zeiger at the station he usually
occupies.
Despite "Joe" Ufer's failure to make
the grade and put in an appearance
as assistant cheer leader on the first
two occasions, "Hal" Smith announced
confidently yesterday that the half-
miler would make his debut this after-
noon.
Tickets for the M. A. C. mass meet-
ing will be distributed shortly. The
committee states that all girls will' be
e>pected to put in an appearance, even
if they have to act as personal escorts
themselves. We're wondering, girls,
just whether this should be considered
as a threat or a promise.

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