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January 28, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-28

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THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OI THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

,;"o .
loop

1'hones :-Editorlal 2414
iBslness 960
LTELEGRAP'i SERVICE BY

VOL XXV. No. 87.

ANN- OR \1CICX RI )A Y, .JANTARY28, I916.

PRICE FIVE

TEUTONICFORCES
THRETEN ALBANIA

E V AID ChorusRehearses
on Honor System' ""' Ron February 14
l rnpitant Issue Cones Up for Vote Lf VI 1ULLL I1cr e hows Will Be Presented in Ann
Tl'diay; Attendance at Meetings Arbor, Beginning
Will Be Taken 1 arch 31

r

JUNIORS ARE CHRG6ED W1IH PROPER
CONDUCT Of HOP;WARN COMMiITE
TO ELIIAE ERCTIVE FEATUR

FALL O lI)URAZZO, CHIEF
PORT, SEEMS IM-
MIN ENT

SEA-

RUSSIANS TAKE TURKISH CITY

Confirmation of Capture Will
(greatest Russian Victory
Since War Begau

Mark

London, Jan. 27.-The fall of Du-
razzo, the chief seaport of northern
Albania, is imminent. The Austrian
army, which in its southward sweep
took Scutari and San Giovanni di Me-
dua, is now only seven hours' march-
ing from Durazzo, the capture of
which will put the Austrians in com-
plete possession of northern Albania.
Avlona, the biggest Albanian port, is
threatened by the Bulgar invading
army.
The paramount question regarding
the whole Albanian situation now is:
Will the Italian expeditionary force
at Avlona make a stand and defend
the port to the last? No resistance is
looked for at Durazzo, where Effad
Pasha with his comparatively small
army of Albanians and remnants of
the Montenegrin and Serbian armies
could do little to stem the tide of the
greatly superior and well equipped
Austrians.
In some quarters the belief is ex-
pressed that not the Bulgars who
took Berat, but the Austrians who
are now driving through the interior
toward the Adriatic cost, will attack
Avlona, because a Bulgarian move on
that port and a consequent clash with
the Italians would, it is argued, result
in a declaration of war between Italy
and Germany. A fact which streng-
thens this theory is that the Bulgars
could have long ago attacked Avlona,
but for some mysterious reasonwaited,
apparently marking time, until the
Astrians had made further progress
in the north and center.
Report Erzerum to Have Fallen
London, Jan. 27.-Erzerum, the prin-
(Continued on Page Six)
EDDY TO THl AT
ARCADE MEETING
Y. X. C. A. Worker to Address Stu-
dents at Regular Sunday
Night Meeting
PROMINENT IN SOCIAL " WORK
Although he has appeared in most
of the large colleges of the country,
Brewer Eddy will give his first address
in Ann Arbor under the auspices of the
Y. M. C. A. at 6:30 o'clock Sunday
night in the Arcade theatre.
Mr. Eddy is one of the secretaries
of the American Board of Foreign Mis-
sions in Boston and his work brings
him in touch with missionary condi-
4tions throughout the world so that he
speaks of the things he knows.
Despite the fact that he has seen
much of the world, the speaker has
the student point of view. He is one
of the youngest of the Board secre-
taries and has always kept in touch
with college men as traveling secre-
tary of the Student Volunteer move-
ment and as one of the leaders in the
Y. M. C. A. conferences at Northfield
each summer.
Born in Kansas, a son of the middle
west, he was graduated from Yale
University with a B. A. and M. A. de-
gree.
Beginning at 6:10 o'clock, free mov-
ing pictures will be shown in the
Arcade theatre. Special music will
also be given.

Classes in the engineering college
will be dismissed at certain hours to-I
day in order that the engineers be
given an opportunity to express them-
selves on the proposed honor system.
The honor co mittee and the faculty
committee in charge of the class as-
semblies are interested in having a
large turnout at the meetings. The
honor committee urges that the class
members come out and vote, as the
faculty, when giving its decision on the
proposed system, will no doubt be
largely influenced by the number that
sign. Attendance at the meetings will
be checked up.
The proposed system will be pre-
sented to the faculty meeting on Sat-
urday along with a petition asking that
it be given a trial at the coming ex-
aminations.
Fifty. Women Act
in fband 2pounce

C

Leon- 1. Cunningham, Comedy
Star, Writes Skit for

Club

Event
Special lighting, careful decorating
and elaborate costuming are a few
of the elements which will enter into
the Japanese act to be staged by 50
members of the Girls' Glee club for
the next Band Bounce, under the di-
rection of Miss Ellen M. Sargent, '16,
president of the association, and Miss
Nora Crant Hunt, vocal teacher at the
School of Music.
Preparations for the act are already
well under way and the energy which
the club is showing promises that it
will be one of the best numbers upon
the big scale program being prepared
for that occasion.
"Military Training" is the name of
a skit written for the Band Bounce by
Leon M. Cunningham, '16, full of clev-
er and entertaining features, explain-
ing the wisest course for thq univer-
sity to pursue in order to reach a
definite conclusion in the matter.
Student Council
Frolvns on Labels

TWO IIITNPRD E)AN) FITY IN -
STr Ir'1,'ENTS TO BE ISTALEI)
AT DELMONICO'S
BANQUIETS IN EAST AND WEST
Professors to Attend Affair Also and
to Propose and Respond
to Toasts
The opportunity for 300 Michigan
alumni of New York and San Fran-'
cisco to hear President-Emeritus
James B. Angell while they are hold-
ing their annual banquets each in
their own city, has been made through
the successful efforts of Win. K. Max-
well, ex-'98, to secure the use of the
transcontinental lines of the Ameri-
can Telephone and Telegraph com-
pany, who will install two hundred
and .fifty phones at Dlmon ic's for
the New York men and o r twenty-
five for the San Francisco alummi.
These meetings will be held on the
same night, Friday. February 4, and
the time of each has been arranged
so' that Dr. Angell will talk to them
at 9:00 o'clock Ann Arbor time. A
direct line will be run into the aged
President-Emeritus' home for this
purpose.
A number of Michigan professors
will speak at the New York function.
Prof. R. M. Wenley will respond to
the toast "The Literary College-
Then and Now." Dean J. R. EingerJ
will also speak on some phase of his
department, while it is expected that
President Harry B. Hutchins will also
be present at the dinner to respond
to a toast.
ORATORICAL PLAY SCORES1 H1I
S ut n i te hou e " W ilPor-
trayed by Members ofc ast
"The Servant in the iome," given
in University hall last night, accord-
ing to its reception, will go on record
as one of the best productions that
the Oratorical Association has ever of-
fere. The acting ability of the en-
tire cast illustrates the consistent
work that was done by them, and to-
gether with a vital and interesting
plot, the play was an unusual success.
COMEDY CLUB TICKETS ON SALE
Pasteboards May Be Reserved at Whit-
ney Theatre
Tickets for the Hop performance
to be given by the Comedy club will
be on sale at the Whitney theatre
commencing February 7 at 10:00. Mail
orders accompanied by check or
money order, should be sent to Mr.
MlcIntire, manager of the Whitney.
Prices will range from 50 cents to
$1.0.0
SALES EXPERT SPEAKS AT 'Y'
Men Interested in Summer Work In-
vited to Be Present
Under the auspices of the F. B.
Dickerson Co., of Detroit, and the R. C.
Barnum Co., of Cleveland, Burt Johns,
sales expert, will speak at the "Y"
this evening at 8 o'clock. All men in-
terested in salesmanship and especial-
ly those planning on summer work are
invited to attend the meeting' tonight.
Mr. Johns, who is a noted vocational
guide, has been retained by the fore-
going concerns to check up the men
signed for work. He vwill be at 721
North University today and Saturday.

The first rehearsal of the chorus
ir the Michigan Union Opera will
be held at 4:00 o'clock, Monday, Feb-
ruary 14, the first day of the second
semester.
The fact that from the beginning
of the semester, only a little more than
fivc weeks remain for the opera to be
ready for stage performance, since the
first show is to take place on March
31, means that the cast and chorus this
year wvill have less tiie to get ready
for the final production than any
other previous opera.
Five shows will be given in Ann Ar-
bor, and at least four outside dates
will be made. The outside engage-
ments have not been formally an-
nounced, although the dates of the
various trips were given out some
time ago. Negotiations are now in
order to secure the Studebaker theatre
in Chicago.t
Director.Morgan will arrive in Ann
Irbor on February 10 to take charge
othe entire show. Scenery models
arri ved from New York city yesterday,
and it is understood that this year's
stage scenery will surpass that of any
other
CONCERT TICKETS
SELLING RAPIDLY1
3lidnight Sons and Mandolin Club Trio
to Present Special
Numbers
TO REPEAT FORMER SONG HITS
Maturing plans for the Junior Hop
concert, to be given Friday afternoon
in Hill auditorium the day before the
Hop by the combined Glee and Mando-
lin clubs, ensure an unusual enter-
tainment.1
Several of the hits of former con-
certs will be included, in the after-
noon's program, among others being!
the "Swing Along" song which ap-
pealed so strongly to the audience in
the novelty concert. The popular Man-
dlin club trio will be on hand with
some special selections. Another ag-1
gregation certain to be popular is
the Midnight Sops quartet, made fam-
ous by its novelty concert appearance.
The Mandolin club will render Mosz-
kowski's Serenade and pick the "Turk-
ish Towel Rag" to pieces. A number
of special acts #ill be put on and the
combined clubs will conclude the en-
tertainment with the "Yellow and
Blue."
Tickets have already begun to sell
rapidly. The three middle sections of"
the auditorium orchestra will be re-
served at 50 cents a seat, while the
two outside sections downstairs and
the balconies will be unreserved at 25
cents per ticket. Reserved seats may
be secured by mail order to D. R. Bal-
lentine, 160 Natural Science building.
The concert will take place on Fri-
day, February 11, between 4 and 5
o'clock.
ACT PLAYS BY"BARD OF AVON"
Trueblood's Class to Present "Mer-
chant of Venice" and "Virginius"

* *
* EVENTS OF J-IIOP WEEK *"
* Friday *
* Musical Clubs' Concert, Hill *
' auditorium, 4:00 1. M. *
' Junior H o p, Gymnasiums, *
* grand march at 9:00 P. Il. *
* First edition of The Michigan *
* Daily's J-Hop Souvenir Extra *
* out at midnight.
Saturday
"The Professor'' Love Story,"
* Comedy Club play, at the Whit- *
ney theatre,.2:30 P. . *
* *
** * * * * * * * +
'Some Job!' S ys
HoP Committee
strenuous Work Marks Week Before
Party for Committeemen. Who
Force Victory
Perhaps very few people realize the
amount of work necessary to stage
"the greatest ever" Hop, which Feb-
ruary 11 will usher into our humble
midst. Let it be said, however, that
the committee for the 1916 Hop has
had a real live problem on its hands.
Instead of the Ticket sale dragging
on for weeks this year, all the trip-
pers of the light fantastic on the cam-
pus marched en masse to the Union
to get pasteboards for the big Junior
party, and in two days the entire sup-,
ply of the elusive admission cards
was exhausted. Then ca'me a hundred
tearful complaints from the gallants
who had invited "Her" to the big an-
nual function, and under this com-
pulsion, permission was obtained to
secure the use of Barbour gymnasium
for dancing, in addition to Waterman
gymniasium.
This doubling of .accommodations,
with but two short weeks to complete
preparations, has thrown confusion in-
to all arrangements. Bids have had
to be reopened, and negotiations en-
tered into on contracts for increased
orders, plans must be arranged in re-
gard to the financial budget, and a
dozen new problems have intruded
upon the sanctity of examination pe-
riod.

CO0I0l l'TEE IOPIS 'THA'T i
FITNr'TIONS BE MODERATE
IN TONE
DISCOURAGE USE OF FLOWE
Copies of Rles to Be Sent ut.
Groups Entertaining
Visitors
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman
the senate committee on student
fairs, has just made public the
structions which his committee h
drawn up for the conduct of J-I
house parties. The letter, addres
to the J-Hop committee, contain
these instructions, is in part as
lows:
"The senate committee on stud
affairs has been charged by the
versity Senate withi the duty of ea
ing such regulations as may be ne
ful for the conduct of the Hop.
appears to us that the end desi
by the senate will be best secured
reducing to a minimum our exp
instructions, and by entrusting as
as possible to you and to the part
pants in the hop the responsibility
observing the spirit of the agreem
by which the Hop was restored
1914-1915. With this in mind we
you to recall that the Hop was disc
tinued in 1913-1914 largely becaus
the unfavorable criticism it had Ora
upon the university; it was char
terized by a degree of extravaa
and exclusiveness held to be unbeci
ing in a state university; the not
ety given to the dance by the pr
throughout the state magnified th
tendencies and created impressions
student life that were injurious to
,university; while popular rumor er
ited the affair with various faults
even more serious character. I
fact that these reports may have b
frequently exaggerated and .in sc
cases false should impress upon :
the need of exercising the utmost c
in avoiding even the- appearance
suspician of such abuss.
"We believe that the Hop Commi
of the class of 1916 conscientio
strove to carry out its promises,:
that its efforts were successful. A
unfortunate occurrences in connect
with some of the house-parties we
willing to attribute to inexperience
thoughtlessness. But wb wish to s-
emphaticaly, as the most import
point in this communication, that
regard all subsidiary private en
tainments given-in connection with
Hop as a part of that function,
that we consider it your duty to d
in your power to prevent mistakes
offences that might work injury to
reputation of the university.
"Accordingly, we offer the follo
instructions for transmission, n1w:
ever manner you deem best, to
groups and organizations attending
Hop and entertaining visitors.
trust that you will look upon ti
suggestions as offered in ylthr in
est. It is our hope that this' ye
party will be so conducted, in all
ticulars and in its general charai
that we can, without hesitation, re
mend to the senate the re-establ
ment of the Hop upon a perma:
basis.
1. Rule 10 in the petition to the
ate provides that "house-parties s
commence not earlier than Fr
morning and end not later than
day afternoon."
2. The taxicab liveries have ag
upon a uniform rate of two dol
per couple to the gymnasium anl
turn. Any attempt at overch

Small
tom

College and High School Cus-
Should Be Tabooed; Russell
Collins, '16, Takes Lead

Owing to the misuse of Michigan
suitcase stickers, the Student Council
at the regular meeting last night de-
cided to work through the local book-
stores to prevent their sale.
It was pointed out that the practice
was not one which gave a favorable
impression to outsiders in general and
that such conduct tended more to-
ward similar practices of high schools
and smaller colleges.
Russell Collins, '16, was appointed
chairman of the committee to visit
the merchants and try to induce them
to refrain from selling them.
A. S. Hart and H. A. Taylor, newly
elected members of the J-lit class,
and the J-Engineers respectively, were
welcomed into the Council and will
hold office for the next three semest-
ers.
TOTEM CLUB TO HOLD BANQUET
WITH ITS DETROIT ALUMNI
The Totem club and its Detroit al-
umni will hold a banquet at the Hotel
Cadillac in Detroit on Thursday even-
ing, February 10. The comnmittee in
charge is making every effort to have
the banquet a success. John D. Lynch,
'10, first president of the club, will
speak, and George Ellis, '16, will act
as toastmaster.

WHAT'S GOING ON
' Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin
ity-Snow and much colder.
TODAY
Faculty recital, Hill Auditorium,
4:15 o'clock.
Freshman Engineers, special class
assembly, 8:00 o'clock, room 348 eng.
Junior Engineers, special class as-
sembly, 9:00 o'clock, room 348 eng.
Senior Engineers, special class as-
sembly, 10:00 o'clock, room 348, eng.
Sophomore Engineers, special class
assembly, 11:00 o'clock, room 348, eng.
Recital of "Merchant of Venice," by
Shakespearean class, Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Zoological Club meets, room 231.
Natural Science building, 11:00
o'clock.
Burt John speaks, at "Y," 8:00
o'clock.
Jeffersonian society meets, Jeffer-
sonian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Webster society meets, Webster
rooms, 7:30 o'clock.

Prof. T. C. Trueblood's class in
Shakespearean reading will give a
public recital of "The Merchant of
Venice" in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
at 8:00 o'clock tonight. Some 40 stu-
dents are taking the course and every
scene will have a different cast.
In addition to this the class will also
give one scene of the tragedy of "Vir-
ginius," by James Sheridan Knowles.
No admission will be charged and-the
public is invited to attend.

TOMORROW
Upper room Bible class meets, 444
S. State street, 7:00 o'clock.
Union dance, Union, 9:00 o'clock.

should be reported to this com:
3. The selection of chaperon
left entirely in the hands of the
(Continued on Page Six)

I' - p.

WHITNEY
THEATRE
Mat. Prices
50c,75c, $1.00

ARE YOU GOING TO THE J-HOP?
IF YOU ARE, DON'T MAKE ANY ATRRANGMENTS FOR SATURDAY AFTERNOON
SAVE THAT DATE FOR

.

SATURD
AFTERNI
FEBRUA
TWEF,

THE

COMEDY

CLUB

PLAY

Two Solid Hours of Laughter and Enjoyment

mm

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