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January 27, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-27

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THE DAILY
$1.i0
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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Phones:--Editorial 2414
BusIness 960
TELEGRAM1 SERVICE BITHE
NEW YORK SUN

I

____ __
..

VOL. XXVI No. 86.

ANN ARBOR, MICH1IGAN, 'l URSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1916.

PRICE PIV CENI

HONOR SYSTEM TO
BE1VOTED ON BY
ENGINEERS FRIDAY
PROPOSE) PLAN TO BE CONSII)-
ERID AT SPECIAL
NEETIN4S ,
FOUR CLASSES TO BALLOT
Resolutions, if Passed, to Be Given
Tri l at Coming Semester
Examinations
A vote on the proposed honor system
for the college of engineering will be
taken at special meetings of the four
engineering classes Friday morning.
The assemblies were requested by the
honor committee and were granted
and are backed by Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley and the faculty members in
charge of the class assemblies.
The assemblies will all 'e held in
room 348 of the Engineering building
as follows: freshmen, at 8 o'clock;
juniors, at 9 o'clock; seniors, at 10
o'clock; sophomores, at 11 o'clock. At
each meeting a member of the honor
committee will be present and will sub-
mit the new proposed honor system as
embodied by the following declaration
of principles:
We, students of the college of en-
gineering, in order to establish the
highest ideals of integrity and honor,
subscribe to the following principles:
I. It is neither honest nor fair to
*his fellow students for any student to
receive aid in a written quiz or exam-
ination.
II. It is desirable that the preven-
tion of dishonesty in examinations be
in the hands of the students rather
than of the faculty.
III. It is the duty of all students
to uphold these principles in word and
act.
In witness whereof we have here-
unto set our names.
The above plan, if passed at the
meetings, will be presented to the fac-
ulty at the meeting on Saturday with
a petition tnat it be given a trial at
the coming examinations. Since the
faculty will base its opinion to a
large extent on the number who sign,
it is requested by the honor committee
that every class member turn out.
SPHINX, JUNIOR HONORARY
SOCIETY, INITIATES E. E. MACK
One lone neophyte was led across
the burning sands of the Sahara to
the realm of the Sphinx last night,
when the junior lit honorary society
held its third election. The lone pil-
grim, Edward Mack, after doing hom-
age at the three pyramids, was in-
vested with the sacred rites of the
great stone face.

Wilson Asks Aid
for Stricken Jews
TI 4)1J y St I'ide for Contributions to
lel 19,010,00 Europeans
Rined by War
President Wilson has set aside to-
day as the day upon which the peo-
ple of the United States are asked to
make contributions for the aid of the
stricken Jews of war-torn Europe.
Contributions for this city and vicin-
ity will be received by Prof. I. Leo
Sharfman, of 1607 South University
avenue, or by Felix M. Warburg, 52
William street, New York city
According to the President's proc-
lamation, there are 9,000,000 Jews in
Europe, the greater portion of whom
are without food, shelter or clothing.
Millions have been driven from their
homes without warning, deprived of
an opportunity to make provision for
the most elementary wants. It is for
these sufferers that the people of the
United States are asked to provide.
Joslyn Returns
from Peae Trip
Unofficial Representative of Univer-
sity With Ford Party Lands
in Newfoundland
Lee E. Joslyn, unofficial representa-
tive of the university on the Ford
peace expedition, has arrived in
America from Holland, according to
advices received in Ann Arbor yes-
terday.
Joslyn telegraphed his parents in
Detroit that he was in St. Johns, New-j
foundland, where his ship, the Noor-
dam, put in for coal. He stated that
he would arrive in New York Satur-
day and would be at his home in De-
troit on Sunday. It is likely that he
will not return to Ann Arbor before
the beginning of the second semester.
TO Sivear in Iwo
Council M~embers
New Men to Take Places Officially
This Evening; Plans for Work <
to Be Started
Two new members will be sworn
in at the meeting of the Student Coun-
cil which takes place this evening at
7:00 o'clock in University hall. ThisI
will be the first gathering of that
body under the supervision of Henry
C. Rummel, '16L, the recently elected
president for the coming semester.
Plans for work to be started after
examinations will form the import-
ant portion of the evening's session.
Owing to the nearness of examinations
the Council will not pass judgment!
on several matters of importance
which have come to its notice.
Vaughan Talks
to Engineers

ORATORS TO STAGE
PERFORMANUE IN
UNIVERSITY HALL
1SENT "'I li SERVANT IN TIR
h1OUSE" AT 8:00 O'LOCK
N, E. PINNEY TAKES TITLE ROLE
Ask That Audience Be Seated Prompt-
ly to Avoid All First Act
Interruptions
"The Servant in the House," to be
given in University hall at 8:00 o'clock
tonight under the auspices of the
Oratorical association, promises to
give the campus something different
from all previous productions. The
play is concerned with the problem of
brotherhood and weaves its plot with-
in the walls of an English country vic-
arage.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, who has
been directing the plays within the
last few years, gave out the following
statement in regard to this year's pro-
duction: "The play is something en-
tirely different from anything we have
ever put on, and offers an excellent op-
portunity for good acting, and I believe
the cast members have taken advan-
tage of that opportunity. Those who
have never seen the play ought not
to miss this opportunity."
The leading role is taken by N. E.
Pinney, '16, who represents "The Serv-
ant in the House," and who finally un-
folds his identity. The vicar, M. S. Mc-
Lean, '16, plays an important part in
the play, and his church . troubles
and family connections give him con-
stant worry. The part of the "drain
man" gives the entire play a humor-
ous touch and balances the more seri-
ous parts of the production.
The audience is requested to be seat-
ed promptly at 8:00 o'clock, when the
curtains will be raised. This re-
quest is important, since the opening
scene of the play is one of the essen-
tial links in the story to be woven.
Seats will continue to be on sale
at Wahr's from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock
thiA afternoon and beginning at 6:45
o'clock at University hall tonight.
SHIFT 1-HOP CONCERT
TO HILL AUDITORIUM

SIR EDWARD GREY DECLARES BRITISH
ACCESSION TO U.S. NOTE WLD-E
PREVENT REA'L GERMAN B9LOC KADE

N. E PIN EY, 'le
Who plays the leading role in
Servait n the House" tonight.

"Tih,

GIVE OUT ELECTION
BL01ANKS ON MONDAY

Finzel and Wright
;to Play at -Hop
Detroit and Columbus Orchestras Get
Extra Music Contracts for
Barbour Gym
J-Hop booths were allotted to repre-
sentatives of groups of 12 or more
ticket-holders at a meeting held at the
Union last evening. Only seven booths
yet remain to be given out.
All persons should now have the
number of the booth which they will
occupy. Any information relative to
booths, including the furnishings, dec-
orations, etc., may be obtained by call-
ing Robert Goodrich at 1016, and all
holders of J-Hop tickets who do not at
this time know what booth they will
occupy should also get in touch with
him.
The two additional orchestras, which
will be used in Barbour gymnasium,
have just been announced. Finzel of
Detroit, and the Wright Saxaphone
complete orchestra of Columbus have
been given the new contracts, with
Shook of Detroit and Russo of Sag-
inaw in the other gymnasium.
HOLD FUNERAL SERICES
FOR LAE DEAN 10eO DEED

Anunouncemuents.

of Changes in Courses

Change Scene of Entertainment
Care for Larger
Crowd

to

Says Engineering and Medicine
Most Important Pro-
fessions

Are

' "Engineering and medicine have
been, and are today, the two most im-
portant professions concerned with
the development of civilization," said
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the medi-
cal school, at the fresh assembly yes-
terday. Dean Vaughan pointed out
the benefits that this generation is
receiving due to the co-operation of
the engineer and the doctor, and by
citing history showed how the Greeks
and Romans were unable to succeed
because of the lack of the latter.
It was announced during the busi-
ness meeting that the group leaders
will get together on Thursday, Feb-
ruary 18, for the purpose of discuss-
ing any issues concerning social and
other class activities.

i
1
t
1
i
1
1
4
c

Plans for the J-Hop concert to be
given Friday afternoon, February 11,
from 4 to 5 o'clock, by the combined
Glee and Mandolin clubs have been so
enlarged that the entertainment will
be given in Hill auditorium instead of
in University hall as was originally
intended. The change has been made
in order that a larger audience may
be accommodated and on account of
the superior acoustic qualities and
more attractive appearance of the au-
ditorium.
Several changes in the program have,
been made, the most important altera-
tion being that the Midnight Sons'
quartet, so popular at the Novelty
Concert given in December, will take
the place of the Varsity quartet. The
members of the Midnight Sons' quar-
tet are P. A. Hartesveldt, '16, Harry
Kerr, '16, W. S. Westermann, '17, and
Harry Carlson, '17.
The concert will be especially wel-
comed by students attending the J-
Hop as providing an entertainment for
guests arriving early Friday afternoon.
Several fraternities and clubs are plan-
ning to reserve separate blocks of
seats for their own members and their
fair visitors.
The concert management is work-
(Continued on Page Six)

E
c
i
e
1
1
1

and Extri .Hour Petitions
Also Given
1UST lE RETURNED BY FEB. 4
The following announcements were
given out yesterday afternoon by Reg-
istrar Hall and affect students in the
literary college only.
Election blanks and class cards will
be given out in the registrar's office
on Monday and Tuesday, January 31
and February 1. Supplementary an-
nouncements of changes in courses
will be given out at the same time.
These blanks must be filled out and
handed in on the following Thursday,
or Friday, February 3 and 4, together
with petitions for extra ours.
It should be remembered that peti-
tions for extra hours which were
granted for the first semester do not
apply to the second, and that new ap-
plications must be made in the regu
lar manner. Blanks for this purpose.
may be obtained with election blanks,
on Monday and Tuesday.
After February 4, a fee of one dol-
lar will be charged for filing election
blanks.
Any students desiring transcripts of
records in order to transfer to other
colleges should ask for them at once.
All freshmen who have not received
from their rhetoric instructor a sheet
of instructions regarding the election of
courses for the second semester should
secure one at once at the registrar's
office.
Grades will not be given to the
students by instructors nor in the reg-
istrar's office. If possible they will
be mailed on February 14 to the ad-
dresses written on the coupons which
were handed in at the beginning of.
the first semester.
In order to avoid errors in mailing
these cards all changes of address
should be reported to the registrar at
once.
Y' STARTS TO BUILD MARCH 1
Plans Due to Arrive This Week for
New Home
Plans and specifications for the new
student Y. M. C. A. building which is
to be erected at Washington and State
streets, are expected to be received
at the associaton this week.
Immediately after they are in the
hands of the building committee, bids
for contracts will be called. It is
thought that all estimates for con-
struction will be in by the last of
February and that active work on the
building will be under' way by March
first.
Original designs place the cost of
the building and equipment at $90,000.

_..

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

Reverend Henry Tatlock
Interment in Forest

Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity
--Snow and colder.
TODAY
Choral Union ushers' report,. U-hall,
7:15 o'clock.
Oratorical associationplay, U-hall,
8:00 o'clock.
J-engineers elect student councilman,
348 new engineering building, 4:00 to
5:30 o'clock.
Tryouts for All-Nation Revue or-
chestra, room 302, main building, Uni-
versity hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Junior Lit election of student coun-
cilmen, library, 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Faculty recital, Hill Auditorium,
4:15 o'clock.
Freshman Engineers, special class
assembly, 8:00 o'clock, room 348 eng.
Junior Engineers, special class as-
sembly, 9:00 o'clock, room 348 eng..
.Senior Engineers, special class as-
sembly, 10:00 o'clock, room 348, eng.
Sophomore Engineers, special class
assembly, 11:00 o'clock, room 348, eng.
Recital of "Merchant of Venice," by,
Shakespearean class, Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.

Cemetery
The funeral of Dr. John 0. Reed,
formerly dean of the College of Litcr-
ature, Science and the Arts, and di-
.rector .oftthe physics laboratory, was
held yesterday afternoon from the'
home of Prof. E. C. Goddard on Hill
street. Interment was in Forest Hill
cemetery.
The Rev. Henry Tatlock, of the!
Episcopal church, officiated. Many,
friends and relatives of the deceased
attended therfuneral. Among those
from out of the city were Mr: Frank
Reed, of New York city, brother of
Dean Reed, Mrs. Will Olcutt, of Du-
luth, Minn., whose husband was a
classmate of the deceased, and Dr. J.
(Continued on Page Six)

Officiates;
Hill

TREASURY MOBILIZATIOY L A N
FOR PURCHASING SECtRI-
TIES SUCCESSFUL
DAMAGE CAUSED BY AIRMEN
Commnece Prosecution Against Vent-
zelos; French to Assist British
in Blockade
London, Jan, 26.-Speaking on a
resolution for "an effective blockade
of Germany," Sir Edward Grey an-
nounced in the house of commons to-
day that in the last American note
to Great Britain "there were sen-
tences" which, "if conceded," would
render it impossible for Great Britain
to prevent goods, even contraband,
going wholesale to the enemy.
Sir Edward, however, did not un-
derstand that that was the attitude
of the United States or any other gov-
ermnent.
"We are going to answer the last
United States note," lie said, "but
only after consulting with the French
government. That consultation is now
taking place, and consultations with
other allies who are concerned in the
carrying out of our policy may fol-
low."
London, Jan. 26.--Reginald McKen-
na, chancellor of the exchequer, made
the announcement to the house of
commons this afternoon that the oper-
ation of the treasury mobilization plan
for the purchasing of American secur-
ities had been productive of most sat-
isfactory results during the first two
weeks of its trial.
Arthur J. Balfour, first lord of the
admiralty, told the commons that the
British government had no evidence
of the possession of 17-inch guns by
the German ravy, although such an
armament was not necessarily im-
possible.
Berlin, by wireless, Jan. 26.-Thir-
ty-nine persons, among them one of-
ficer and 24 soldiers, were killed, one
transport was sunk and several rail-
road cars loaded with provisions were
destroyed when Greman airmen raided
Dover Monday, according to the Ham-
burg Fremdenblatt. Several cottages,
the paper adds, were blown to pieces.
(Continued on Page Six)
DELAY CONCERT TICKET SALE
Will Open General Campaign Monday,
February 7
It was decided yesterday not to
carry on the ticket-selling campaign
for the Armenian concert until Mon-
day, February 7. Until' that time,
mail orders will be received by A. H.
Koumian, '16M, at 213 Glenn avenue.
Seats may also be reserved by calling
2270-M in the evening. Prices for
tickets will range from 75 cents to
25 cents.
To our
Advertisers
Tomorrows' paper will be
the last issue of the Mich-
igan Daily this semester.
QAdvertising copy for this
issue must be in by two
o'clock t o d ay. The
Daily will resume
publication
February 15th

GEORGE D. WILNER, '16
Who will play the part of the "DraIn
Man" in "The Servant in the House"
tonight.

1 1

A Popular Play
at Popular Prices
25c,35c, 50c
At WAHR'S, 2
to 5 p.m. All
Seats Reserved.

YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO MISS

"TTHE
TONIGHT

SERVANT

IN

THE

H OUSE"

A Story
of Ambition
and Avarice
within the Folds
of the Church.

CHAS. RANN KENNEDY'S.GREAT DRAMA
UNIVERSITY HALL

8 O'CLOCK

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