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January 26, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-26

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THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

F i
If Iff 11
"amp
f.

Phones:a-Edito i2 214
BusiWess 90
TELEQRAL'i SERYW101 BY filE
NEW YORK SUN

7L0 XXVI. No. F5.

ANN ARDOR, MRrICI;'N. VEDN:SDAY, JANUARY 26, 1916. 1

PRICE FIVE CENTI

ullgwi P NEW PLAN
FOR HON01 SISEM
AMONG ENGINEERS
(0O1U)LITTEE REVISES OLI) PLAN
BECAUSE OF OPPOSITION
TO SIGNING PLEDGES
WILL NOT REQUIRE PLEDGES
Students Simply Asked to Subscribe
to Principles by Signing
Names to Statement
The honor committee of the college
of engineering met last night and drew
up a new plan to submit to the engi-
neering students for the government of
the coming finals.
At the class assemblies last week
the students gave a decided expression
of opinion on two points: There was
a large majority in favor of .an honor
(Continued on Page Six)
PUT TICKETS ON
SALE FOR CONCERT
Armenian Students' Club to Stage
Performance February 18
In 11111 Audltoriumn
ARMENIAN TALENT TO APPEAR
Tickets go on sale tomorrow for the
concert to be given in Hill auditorium
on Friday evening, February 18, under
the auspices of the Armenian Students'
club. The concert is to be given not
only for the benefit of the Armenian
war sufferers, but also to acquaint the
campus with Armenian art.
Posters have been distributed an-
nouncing the concert, and all frater-
nities and sororities will be canvassed,
as well as the dormitories. A pre-
liminary ticket-selling campaign will
be carried on this week and next.
All tickets for the main floor and for
the first balcony will be reserved for
this occasion. The first seven rows
of the main floor in the center, sec-
tions II, III, and IV, will be sold at
50 cents. The next 10 rows of these
sections will be sold at .75 cents, and
the remainder of the first floor at 50
cents. Seats in both balconies will
be sold at 25 cents. No seats will be
reserved in the second balcony.
Miss Rose Panossian, Mrs. J. Hago-
pian, Mr. A. Shah-Mouradian, and Mr.
Kr. Aiqouni, the artists who have been
secured for the occasion, are all mak-
ing great sacrifices to come, and are
practically donating their services.
All are native Armenians. While in
Ann Arbor they will be entertained by
the Armenian Students' club. Dean
Myra B. Jordan has asked Miss Pan-
ossian and Mrs. Hagopian to be guests
at Newberry Residence hall.

SHOLDBELSIJ ~
rA tt Z ;3M

RUSSHiAs DETLE TO JOIN BRITISH
IN RElIEF OF GARRISO AT (UT:
REPOR T CAPTURE 4,00 TUR

IV

HOld) i~iEET1N~ I"OR
IEXPi.flIIENVED IN

1y p I F_,l '.

ATTENDANCE MORE THAN 100

Dr. de Nancrede and jor
Among Those Present at
Union Gathering

S o u'le

LUCILE L. PIKE, '16
Who will play the part of "Mary"
hi "The Servant in the House," Thurs-
day night.
HOLD FUNERAL oF
DEAN REED TODAY
Former Students of Late Physics De.
partment Head to Act as
Palbearers
FUNERAL IS PUBLIC TO FRIENDS
The body of Dean John O. Reed, who
died Sunday night at the home of his
brother in Cleveland, reached this city
yesterday afternoon at 4:45 o'clock.
The pallbearers met the train and
took the body directly to Prof. E. C.
Goddard's residence on Hill street,
where the funeral services will be held
this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
Six members of the physics depart-;
ment, all of whom were students
under Dean Reed, have been selected
Late Joln 0. Reed, Former Dean of
Literary College, whose funeral is to
be held this afternoon.
at pallbearers. They a Prof. H. M.
Handall, Prof. N. H. Williams, Prof.
W. D. Henderson, Mr. D. L. Rich and
Mr. W W Sleator The funeral will
not be private and all friends of the
deceased who desire to do so may at-
tend. The Rev. Henry Tatlock will
conduct the services and burial will
be in Forest Hill cemetery.
Dr. A. W. Reed, brother to Dean
Reed, Mrs. A. W. Reed and the wife
and daughter of the deceased, accom-
panied the body to Ann Arbor.
Members of Toastmasters, in which
organization Dean Reed was active
while a member of the faculty, will
attend the funeral in a body.
Germany Fails to Meet U. S. Demands
Washington, Jan. 25.-Germany has
again failed to meet in express terms
American demands for a settlement of
the Lusitania controversy.+

"The students want military train-
ing, the faculty wants them to hav,?
it, so I see absolutely no reason why
it should not be a success," said Prof.
L. M. Gram in concluding the meet-
ing held by the Senate Committee on
Military Training for all undergri di-
uates who have had previous expe-
rience along these lines, at the Union
last evening.
More than 100 undergraduates were
present who fulfilled these require-
ments, and each handed in to Prof.
W. H. Hobbs, secretary of the com-
mittee, a card which stated just what
sort of training he had already re-
ceived.
Dr. de Nanerede Speaks
Dr. C. B. G. de Nancrede, chairman
of this committee, was the first speak-
er, and explained the purpose of the
meeting. He developed the impor-
tance of the proposed training, and ex-
plained that one of the chief difficul-
ties would be in efficiently officering
the 2700 students who would be eli-
gible to drill, in case the board of re-
gents approved it.
Of Great Value in After Life
Major Soule, former treasurer of
the university, spoke, giving as his
opinion that military training was a
branch of education which would not
interfere with any other study and
which might easily prove of the great-
est value in after life. "I am in favor
of military drill," he concluded, "and
f have been trying to get the univer-
sity to adopt it since 1883."
DI1RECTORUSA

:1. S. MacLean, '16
Who will play the part of the vicar
in "The Servant in the House," Thurs-
day nht.
PLAY1REERSA
Irst Dres Rehearsal of "The Serv-
ant in the hiouse" Indicates
l emellent Performance
,EV 1 j1LE CONTINUES EVERY DAY
The first dress rehearsal held last
night of "The Servant in the House"
to' be given in University hall tomor-
:§w evening, assured the preduction of
the directors that this years' produc-
tion will be the best ever offT ed the
campus. Sales at Wahr's bookstore
the last few days point to a large au-
dience.
The costumes secured are said to
harmonize with the general tone of the
plain English country vicarage, which
remains the scene during the entire
play, the play itself being divided into
five acts. The time of the play is an
early morning in spring, and the time-
ly appearance of the lost brother, at
First misunderstood and falsely taken,
gives the play a keen interest.
Perhaps the most interesting part
of the play is the "drain-trouble" in
the church, which gives a touch of
humor to the entire play. The rough,
unpolished charater of Robert, the
drain-cleaner, promises to be one of
the attractions, and this, mixed with
ihe serious mood of the vicar, balances
the entire production.
The seat sale will continue at Wahr's
bookstore on State street from 2:00
to 5:00 o'clock daily at the popular
prices of 25, 35, and 50 cents.
CROWDS HISS FRENCH PREMIER
Refense of Censorship by Briand
Meets With Opposition from
. Audience
Paris, Jan. 25.-Premier Briand's
voice was drowned out by cries of
protest today while he was trying to
deliver a speech in defense of the cen-
sorship. His explanation that the cen-
sors were men who had been wounded
at the front was met with ridicule and
shouts of "since when."
CANADIAN STEAMER TORPEDOED
L crpool Dispatch Reports Dominion
Liner Norseman Sunk Near f
British Isles
London, Jan. 25.-The sinking of the
Dominion liner Norseman is reported
in a Liverpool dispatch to the Ex-
change Telegraph company.
The big steamship had been in
freight service on the Atlantic and

TODAY'S J-H )OINGS
* Amen who have not arranged *
xfor their booth e~ns4ers to*
* make up a group of twelve, *
* meet at the Union at -.:30 to-
night. *
* lEach group of twelve already *
formed send a representative to *
* draw for choice of booths at the *
* Union at 8:00 o'clock. *
* Each party representative
bring with him the green booth *
tickets, properly signed, of all *
* the occupants of his booth. *
* Each holder of a J-Hop ticket *
must make final arrangements *
* at tonight's meeting in order to *
huve booth accommodations at *
* the Hop. *
**
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
FINA L ALOTMENT
OF BOOTHS TODAY
Last Call for Those Who Have Not
Secured Accommodations
for J-Hop
CHAPERONE TICKETS ARE LEFT
Final allotment of booths for the J-
Hop will be made at 8:00 o'clock to-
night at the Union. Any person pre-
senting 12 of the green booth tickets,
properly signed, will be permitted to
draw for choice of booths for the par-
ty he represents.
Most of the holders of tickets have
by this time become affiliated with
a party of 12 or more,and have ar-
ranged for those with whom they will
share a booth. In the event that there
are any men who have not made final
arrangements as to their booth part-
ners, the committee ask that they meet
at the Union at 7:30 o'clock so as
to become connected with a group
party before the drawing for booths
at 8:00 o'clock. It is absolutely essen-
(Continued on Page Six))
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Snow and colder, with strong wes-
terly winds.
TODAY
Fresh Engineers' Assembly, room
348, Eng building, 11:00 o'clock.
Senior Architects meeting, 312 Eng.
building, 5:00 o'clock.
Vespers, Newberry hall, 5:00 o'clock.
Band rehearsal, School of Music,
7:00 o'clock.
Fresh Glee club meets, McMillan
hall, 7:15 o'clock.
Fresh Mandolin club practice, room
205, N. W. U-hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Meeting of all J-Hop ticket hold-
ers who are not yet connected with a
booth party of twelve, Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Drawing for choice of J-Hop booths,
Union, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Junior Lit election of student coun-
cilmen, 101 Ec. building, 4:00 o'clock.
Choral Union ushers' report, U-hall,
7:15 o'clock.
Oratorical association play, U-hall,
8:00 o'clock.
J-engineers elect student councilman,
348 new engineering building, 4:00 to

GRAM) 1)UKE MAI TAKE ERZERUN,
STRiONG HOLD OF TURKS
IN ARMENIA
RUSSIANS ADVANCE IN GALICIA
Germans to Force Issue on Western
Front by Attacking Nieuport
and Dunkirk
London, Jan. 25.-While the British
are sacrificing thousands of men in
a heroic effort to cut their way through
to Kut-el-Amara, where Genera
Townsend and a British army are bot-
tled up by the Turks, the Russians to
the north are making the Turks strain
every nerve to keep them from coming
to. the aid of the British.
The Grand Duke's victory near Er-
zerun will undoubtedly be even great-
er than early reports showed. Ac-
cording to Reuter's Telegraph com-
pany, 4,000 Turks were captured by
the Russians, while the - number of
killed, wounded and forced into scat-
tered flight was enormous.
Though Erzerun, the stronghold of
Turkish Armenia, is strongly fortified,
its chances for holding out against the
Russians are decreasing by the fact
that 100,000 refugees have sought shel-
ter there. The dispatch adds that
the Russians took scores of. machine
guns and a great quantity of muni-
tions.
Russians Victorious in Galiciai:
London, Jan. 25.-The Russian
drive, which began as an offensive in
the Bessarabian region only and was
aimed to divert the attention of the
central powers from the Allies' Salon-
iki army, has developed into a smash-
ing offensive all along the south Ru-
sian and Galician front.
An official report received from Pet-
rograd today reveals that while des-
perate battles were being fought near
Czernowitz and other points along th
Ioumanian border, the Czar's troops
have advanced great distances, not
only in that part of Volhymia which
holds the famous Lutsk, Novel and
Rovno triangle of forts, but actually
has come to within two and two-thirds
miles of Pinsk, in the marsh region of
Volhymia.
German Aeroplanes Bombard Dunkirk
London, Jan 25.-Apparently the
Germans have decided to force the
issue on the western front, by attack-
ing the allies vehemently in two places
with a view of breaking through and
crushing the extreme left of the Anglo
French-Belgian line now resting on the
North sea.
After their vain attempt at a ter-
rific drive at Nieuport the Germans
pounded away at the allies there all
night with artillery. This morning
two aeroplanes dropped bombs on
Dunkirk. A German seaplane was
forced to the water by a British ma-
chine northeast of Nieuport about the
same time.
The Germans lost a terrific infantry
attack on the French along a 1,500
yard front in the vicinity of Neuville
late Monday. This assault was check-
ed, though the French suffered a small
loss of guns.
Turks Release French Ministers
Berlin, by wireless, Jan. 25.-The
Turkish government has released eight
members of the French embassy who
had been seized in reprisal for the
arrest of the consular officials of the
central powers by the allied troops at
Saloniki.
Wilson Urges New Tariff Board
Washington, Jan. 25.-President Wil-
son today requested Majority Leader
Rep. Kitchin to take up with the ways

Leader of Varsity Band to
Body of From 40 to 50
for Big Event

Orgauize
Len

TO hOLD TRYOUTS TOMORROW
Responding to an invitation extend-
ed him by the management of the All-
Nation Revue last night, Captain Wil-
fred Wilson, leader of the Varsity band
and one of the best orchestra directors
in the state, has agreed to direct and
organize the orchestra for that pro-
duction which will be held in Hill
auditorium March 7 and 8. Tryouts
will be held tomorrow afternoon at
4:00 o'clock in room 302, main building
of University hall.
It is planned to organize an orchestra
of between 40 and 50 pieces and in
order that results may be all that is
desired Captain Wilson wishes to make
all preliminary arrangements, select
his men andistribute the music be-
fore examinations..
This will be the largest student or-
chestra that has ever played for any
campus production. When interviewed
on this matter Mr. Wilson was enthu-
siastic over the possibilities both as re-
gards the orchestra and the production
itself.

I

Debate Blockade in House of Commons
London, Jan 25.-The proposed ac-{

Mr. A. Shah-Mouradian, tenor, of
the Paris Grand Opera, who will ap-
pear in 11111 Auditorium on Friday
evening, February 18, in the Armenian
concert.
1. r

tual blockade against Germany and presumably was sunk in waters around
Austria will be debated in the House the British Isles. If this presumption
of Commons tomorrow. The principal is correct sbe is the largest liner ex-
speech will be made by Sir Edward cepting the Lusitania and Arabic sunk
Grey. in British waters by submarines.

5:30 o'clock. and means committee the matter of
Tryouts for All-Nation Revue or- formulating a law creating a tariff
chestra, room 302, main building, Uni- board, to cope with new industrial
versity hall, 4:00 o'clock. conditions created by the war.

A SPECIAL J-HOP PRODUCTION OF

. .1

WHITNEY
THEATRE
Mat. Prices
50c,75c,$100

"tH E PROFESSOR'SLOVE STORY"

AFTERNOON
FEBRUARY
TWELFTH

CO M

WILL BE GIVEN BY THE
EI D YIC L UB

AST

C

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