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January 25, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_ -.. - --'- . ._._. 61

Lothing

Sale

Buy Columbia Records
AND SAVE MONEY

I

IS NOW ON. Our entire stock of MEN'S
SUITS and OVERCOATS (blues and blacks
excepted) at
'L/4 Off
Odd Pants 1-4 off Bath Robes 1-4 off
Underwear, Union Suits, $1.50 to $5.00, -20% off
Flannelette Pajamas and Night Robes, 20% off
Wadhams & Co.'s Corner

Latest Popular Songs
Latest Dance Records

- 6- $1.0l

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These Records can be used on any Standard make
of Machine and will unfailingly give the best of
satisfaction.
For long life and clear, clean-cut reproductions
use Columbia Records and Columbia Needles.
Ailmendinger )'usic Shop
122 E. Liberty Street
LOOK FOR THE NOTES' 4

Main & Washington Sts.

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Doncaster
COLLAR
Shows over the coat in back;,
low sharp, smart curveaway
front; good knotandslidespace
2-for''5c
CLUET. PEABODY &CO.. Inc.. Makers. TROY. N.Y.

ad gain the admniraiion of al
by having your next suit
Custom Ta~kred
by
ARTHUR F, MARUARDT
Campus Tarlo
516 East William St Phone 1422-J

TAKE YOUR FRIENDS

TO THE

CRYSTAL RESTAURANT

FOR
J- HOP MEALS

Breakfast. 6-10

Dinner, 11-2
Short Orders at All.:ours

Supper, 4-8

MUSIC WITH YOUR MEALS
601 East Liberty

.....s

plying high scholarship. They are
not affected materially by the honor
system. They are "honorable" al-
ready and need no system to enforce
their strict observance of the honor
code. Also they do their work satis-
factorily in any case and thus are
not materially benefited by an honor
system.
soor students who are honest also
gain nothing by the change. Being
honest it makes no difference to the
poor student whether an instructor
be in the room during examination pe-
riod or not. In fact the honest stud-
ent is to all practical purposes alone
when writing his examination. Now
the only way in which the mediocre or
poor student can possibly be benefited
by the honor system is by its inducing
the dishonest student to mend his
ways. When there is cheating the av-
erage of the class is raised, the cheat-
ers getting high marks. Most grad-
ing is done on the "class average"
basis and hence the man on the mar-
gin is the one to suffer if the average
goes up. We need not bother about
the good student, a slight shifting of
the average does not concern him for
he passes anyway. It is the marginal
man we must think of, for when the
marks of the good students, plus the
marks of those who have cheated are
added up and averaged, the poor stud-
ent's grade is apt to fall below. This
dispels the idea of some people who
say that a man who cheats only hurts
himself; it is not so, he hurts the mar-
ginal student. The same thing is true
when an "absolute grade" is used as
the passing mark, for in the end all
class work must be adapted to the
average ability of the men in the class.
No passing grade can ever be really
absolute. If experience proves that
few men can pass the absolute grade
that has been set, the character of
the work is made easier s&that more
of them can pass. It must be so.
This being the case then-the mar-
ginal man suffering from the dishon-
esty of the crook--is it to be expected
that an honor system will improve the
crook? There are very few good stu-
dents who are dishonest, if for no
oher reason than that they don't have
to be. Those good students that are
dishonest come to the point of cheat-
ing because they have been too lazy
to do their work. Will an honor sys-
tern induce such to use the ability
they have and thus put them in a class
with the good students who are hon-
est? Unquestionably it will--some of
them. Just one factor is to be con-
sidered and that is the degree of their
laziness. Those of low degree lazi-
ness will be shamed into working,
those of high degree laziness will wel-
come an opportunity to be more sloth-
ful than ever, trusting to bluff and
cheating. I do not see how the de-
fenders of the honor system can do
more than guess that a majority will
fall in the first class named. I
guess that a majority will fall
in the other class; but I am will-
ing to compromise and call upon the
opposition to meet me half way and
admit that probably an equal number
will fall in each group, and nothing is
gained. So far we have not found
justification for the honor system.
Iow about the poor student who is
dishonest?! He is in the only remain-
ing group to be considered. Under
the honor system he would have two
very strong inducements to cheat:
(1) The fact that he was a poor
student anyhow and must make every
word in his examination paper count
for something, and (2) The fact that
dishonesty is now resorted to more
easily than under the old system. And
when he sits there, biting his finger
nails, and sees the good students who
are honest finish their papers and

I.

walk off complacently, and sees the
good students who are dishonest
fumbling with extra papers*
glancing frequently at their
watches and doing all those other
little things that are not "sure evi-
dence," and when he sees the mediocre
students who are even Detter than he
knitting their brows over their work,
what is our poor student who was
formerly dishonest going to do? Sud-
denly reform? Well, allright, I'll grant
you some of them, and I think it a
magnanimous grant; but let me claim
the rest whom I think would give in
after a few qualms of conscience and
hand in astonishingly able papers to
help raise the standard. Thus we are
no further toward justifying the
honor system than we were at the be-
ginning.
In brief I wish to clinch the point
that honest students need no honor
system to keep them honest, and that
not enough dishonest students will be
reformed to counterbalance those who
will take advantage of greater op-
portunities to be dishonest. And fur-
ther, that it is always the marginal
student who suffers from the dishon-
esty of his fellows and nothing should
be done to make his lot more hard.
The success of an honor system de-
pends in part upon the way in which
it is administered. In general there
are two methods. In both the stud-
ent pledges himself not to receive
help, in the one, however, he also
pledges to report violations of the
code that he observed. The first, the
real honor system, gives widest op-
portunity for abuse, the dishonest man
having practically nothing to fear.
The other sort I think is improperly
called an "honor" system. Every
man in the room becomes a guard.
The strongest motive for being honest
is still the fear of being caught. In
fact the fear of being caught is inten-
sified for every man becomes a po-
tential watchman and the disgrace
following detection is more complete.
'How can there be true honor when
the most potent restraining influence
is fear? It is stultifying to the hon-
est man, especially if he feels obliged
to tattle; and it is a relic of boyhood
days for every sport loving man to
hate a squealer. Especially is this so
in the case of the honest man who has
gained nothing by the honor system,
and who may properly resent having
virtual spies all around him who have
not authority such as is invested in
the instructor. Call such measures
"self-government" If you will, but
please not an "honor system."
Claims that honor systems are
working successfully here and there
prove nothing. Nobody can know
positively whether an honor system
is working or not, and nobody can be
sure that the scholastic standing is
not artificially high to the misfortune
of the marginal students. I strenu-
ously protest against introducing 'any
honor system that gains nothing for
the honorable man and robs the medi-
ocre student of his best assurance that
the class average will be a legitimate
one, that is by removing the instructor
from the room and inviting the crook
to do his worst.
KIRK H. PORTER, Grad.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY CONVENES;
I. J. CARNEY'TO READ PAPER
R. J. Carney, instructor in analytical
chemistry, will read a paper on "The
Determination of Thorium in Monazite
Sand," at the January meeting of the
University of Michigan branch of the
American Chemical society, which will
be held at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon,
in room 151 of the chemistry building.

LUNCHES, CANDIES, HOT SUNDAES
AT THE
SUGAR BOWL
109 SOUTH MAIN STREET
WE MAKE OUR OWN CANDIES OUT OF
THE PUREST AND BEST MATERIALS
\ a
"An Army Figt on Its Stomach"
-and the same holds true of an athletic team.
When strength and alertness are fighting it
out it is good condition that turns the battle.
As a regular daily diet there is no better body
builder than
A sound, healthy stomach is the basis of speed and
endurance-this is a reason for the use of Shredded
Wheat. It contains those food elements that nourish
the blood and strengthen the body. To last through
the game and come out strong make this whole wheLaL
food a regular part of your training. It is healthfuil
and at all times fresh and good.
Served with fruit and berries or alone with milk
or cream.
"There is health and strength in every shred"
Made only-by
The Shredded Wheat Company, Niagara Falls, N. Y.

THIS
Week's Schedule of

Special Events

Linen Sale
First Floor-Left
Cotton Bedding Sale
First Floor-Right
Women's Shoe Sale
First Floor-Rear
Women's Knit Under-
wear Sale First Floor-Rear,
Winter Garment Sale
Second Floor
Whether you want to take a train
or make a call, we will get you there
on time. Our service is just as
prompt in bad weather as on pleasant
days. Stark Taxicab Co., phone 2255.
tf

OPPOSES HONOR SYSTEI
AND PTU1 ET TNOTIN
TO 1 JASE BY S1'STE'
} ditor, The Michigan Daily:
I regret that I cannot be in sym-
patly with the "Ionor system." Any.
movement which aims at such laud-
able ends and solicits our assistance
towards raising tle standard of honor
amongst college men and toward giv-
ing fuller opportunity for the better
expression of high ideals certainly,
has a presumptivo claim upon ou
heartiest support. Therefore I have
not ome to my conclusion hastily
nor without weighing the question
fairly, after careful observation. Let
us see what claims are made for it.
There would be no object in intro.
(hicing an honor system unless it
aimed toward the ultimate good of
somebody. Those concerned are the
faculty and students. I think we may
properly leave the faculty out of con-
sideration for they have nothing to
gain or lose. Students we must divide
into more or less arbitrary groups.
Take first the good students who are
honest, and I use the word good im-

lm

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1904

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students'
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Plaiting and Buttons also made to order

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WANTED
WANTED-Position by young lady
as maid or waitress in a boarding
house or sorority. Address B,
care Michigan Daily.
WANTED--Student to sell snappy line
of custom made nockwear, dwring
leisure hours. Call Mr. iramer.
1184, in the evening.
L<.ST
LOST-Pair of nose-glasses in case
labelled Ogden, Utah. Return to:
treasurer's office.
LOST-Small key ring with five keys
and fine brass surveying checks.
Finder please call 2Q24-M. Reward.

L(S'- Black fox fur tail. near the
campus. Call 18:2-
FOR RENT
FOR RENT--Good warm single room
on first floor or suite on second floor;
very desirable; call at 101 South
Thayer street, or phone 1398J. -
FOR iiENT'l Large single room; elec-
tricity. Phone 633-1, 413 Thomipsio
W'OR SALB
FOR SALE--Fl i ss suit, $$55.OO.
In good condition. Will sell for
$10.00. Fit either 35 or 36. 503 S.
Fifth avenue.

f

o YOV KNOW
That you can save money by buying
CLASSICAL MVSIC AND BOOKS
at

Y. N. C. A. EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
CANVASSES WORKING STUDENTSI
In an effort to ascertain accurately
the expenses of employed students in
the different colleges and departments,'
the "Y" employment bureau has start-
ed a canvass among Michigan men for
this purpose.
The "Y" has received many inquiries
as to the cost of attending the univer-
sity and in the past only meagre in-
formation has been available for re-
plies Philip C. Lovejoy, '16, employ-
ment secretary, hopes to find out the
average expenses for the year of rep-
resentative students. Active work in
this line will commence early next
semester. -

IiE PLUTrATI 4ON TEAMS TO I MKE
TRIPS IN E ASTER VACATION
Deputation teams from the "Y" will
make two ten-day trips during Easter
vacation and training for the squads
will commence at once, under the di-
rection of the deputation department.
One team will go to Oakland county
where they will work in Big Beaver,
Troy and Warren. The other team
will visit Hudson,
There will be four men on each
squad, who will take charge of meet-
ings to be held at churches, Y. M.
C. A.'s and other organization's. The
department requests that all men in-
terested in the movement report at
the "Y" as soon as possible.

GrinnellBros.' Music House
Best Pianos in the City For Rent
Victro1Ls $15.00 to $250.00
Our Victor Record Service Cannot Be Beaten
Phone 1707 . 116 South Main St.

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