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October 13, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-13

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Michl. 11
0 .9

Daily

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pliones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TEL GAP1l SERVICE BY THE
IlW YORK SUN

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PRICE FIVE CENTS

Voil. XX.VT No. S

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1915.

vui.. v.. ..... ,. .. ,
e _- __

r4

CHANGED LINEUP
FAgCES MARETTA
IN TODA'S GAME
WIALEN TO GO IN AT LEFT
(WUAid) AND HILDNER
AT IGlT EM)
ROEHM AND CATLETT TO PILOT
Information Limited as to Storength of
Visiting Aggregation in
Today's Game

M

150TO ATTEND MEETING
OF MICHIGAN LIBRARY
ASSOCIATIONTHIS WEEK
Melbr kd s of Facul1 and Prominent
(titdc Spwakers to Address
(oi~enticn Here
PROF. R. M. WENLEY WILL SPEAK
ON "IT AND I" THIS EVENING

PROFSSOR TALAMON D[CORATUD
FOR BRAVERY IN ARMYT IR[NCN

GLEE CLUB TRYOUTS Y.M.C.A. CAMPGN
To BE HELD FRIAY FO R
AT SCHOOL OF IUSI C R B ERS HIP

-o -

Word has been received that Assist-
ant Professor Rene Talamon, of the
French department, who is a second
lieutenant in . the French army, and
who has been at the front since the
beginning of the war, has been deco-
rated for bravery.
The following account of Professor
Talamon's distinguished action was
first given out to his sister, a nurse
in a Paris hospital, by a wounded sol-
dier of his command.

VISITORS TO BE GUESTS
FREE, CONCERT BY
M US ICIANS

AT AI

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rfmday's Lille-UP~S

Dunne......
Watson......
Whalen.....
HTowe.......
Cochran
(Capt.)...
Norton.. .
Hildner....
Roehm,
Catlett...
Maulbetsch .
Benton...
Smith.. . .

Marietta
L. E. Sutton

L. T.
L. G.
C.

(Capt.)
....Turnbull{
.Miller
....Baume

R. G. ..Williams,
Ross
R. T. . Aumond
R. E..McIntyre

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Q.B.........Hayes
L. H. ....Whiting
R. H. Freshan,
Wickstrom
F. B. .....Meister
alter Kennedy, of

Referee---W

Chicago.
Umpire-Leigh

Lynch, of

Brown.
Time of quarters, 15 minutes.
Ga.me called at 4:05 o'clock.
* * * * * * * * * * *

Ann (Arbor's Civic association and
campus have completed their plans
for the entertainment of the 150 dele-
gates expected to arrive in the city
today to attend the twenty-fifth an-
nual meeting of the Michigan Library
association which convenes in Alumni
Memorial hall for a three-day con-
vention beginning this afternoon. The
sessions of the convention will be
open to the public.
Theodore W. Koch, of the univer-
sity library, is president of the asso-
ciation, and F. L. D. Goodrich, also
of the university library, is the acting
secretary of the organization. Prof.
R. M. Wenley, of. the philosophy de-
partment, will be the speaker of this
evening, his address being on the sub-
ject, "It and I." Other members of
the faculty will take part in the pro-
gram tomorrow and Friday, including
Prof. W. W. Bishop, Prof. W. D. Hen-
derson, Dr. F. G. Novy, Prof. J. S.
Reeves, Prof. H. E. Riggs and Prof.
A. G. Ruthven.
. Among the variety of features
planned for the entertainment of the
visitors will be specially arranged
complimentary concert by the fac-
ulty of the school of music in Hill
auditorium at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon, and a special automobile
tour of Ann Arbor on Friday after-
noon as guests of the Civic associa-
tion. The delegates will be the guests
of the Ann Arbor Library club for
supper Thursday evening at Mack's
tea room.
Among the principal speakers will
be Herbert S. Hirshberg, librarian of
the Toledo public library, and Miss
Nina K. Preston, of the state library
at Lansing. Mr. Charles Moore, sec-
retary of the State Historical Com-
mission at Lansing, will deliver an
address Thursday evening on "Michi-
gan Worthies Worth Knowing."
WHAT'S GOING ON

hung upon a green and red ribbon. A
recent communication from France
gives the text of the official sunnons
for decoration, which is as follows:
"Le General commandant de la Xe
armee cite a l'ordre de l'armee le sous
lieutenant Talamon Rene du 205e
Regiment d'infanterie : Blesse au pied
par un eclat d obus, quelques instants
avant l'attaque, a tenu a garder le
commnandement, et a la conduire a
l'assaut des tranchees allemands, un
assaut au cours duquel it a recu deux
nouvelles blessures.".
Professor Talamon is a native of
France and a graduate of the Univer-
sity of Paris. He came to Michigan
in the fall of 1909 and taught in the
French department until June, 1914,
when he iwas married to Miss Beatrice
Underwood, a niece of Oscar Under-
wood, the sneaker of the House. They
went to France on their honeymoon,
and were there when the war broke
out. Professor Talamon was then a4
non-26mmissioned officer in the Re-
serve and joined his regiment imme-
diately.
During the first five months of the
war he acted as drill sergeant. Then,
in January, he asked to be put into
active service. His request was
granted, and he went immediately into
the trenches.
Until her ,husband was wounded
Mrs. Talamon acted as interpreter for
the English and French surgeons in
a military hospital at Jouilly. She is
now with Professor Talamon at
Rennes, the capital of Brittany. For-
tunately, his wounds were not danger-
pus, but the most serious of them may
cause him to lose the use of one hand.
If his wounds have not rendered him
unfit for service he will rejoin his
regiment. If they have, there is a
possibility that he will receive an hon-
orable dismissal and be enabled to re-
enter the faculty of the university be-
fore the end of the war. He is now
upon a leave of absence.

LIEUTENANT RENE TALAMON,3
Member.of faculty and former director
of the Cercle Francais, who has been
decorated for bravery while fighting
with the French army.
"While his company was waiting
for the order to make a charge upon
the German trenches, Professor Tala-
mon was wounded in the foot by a
bursting shell. A superior officer or-
dered him to go to the rear, but in-
stead of obeying the order he stayed
and led his men in a successful at-
tack, receiving two more wounds. The
soldier said that 'his lieutenant had
made himself the idol of the men by
his fearless conduct.
"Professor Talamon's deco4ation is
the "Cross of War with Palm," and
consists of a bronze cross with a palm,

44,

Michigan faces Marietta today with
two changes in the lineup, Whalen
going in at left .guard, and Hildner
at right end. Roehm will start at
quarterback, but he ,will share the
duties with "Buzz" Catlett.t
Karl Staatz injured his foot during
the Mount Union game, and will prob-t
ably be out of the lineup for the rest
of the week, although he may _be in t
thet
shape for Saturday's contest with
Case.
(Continued on Page Three)
AMES COUZENS RESIGNS;
FORD GO, LOSES OFFICIAL
Trouble Due to Disagreement With
Mr. Ford Over His Public
War Utterances
Detroit, Oct. 12.-James Couzens.
vice-president, treasurer and general
manager of the Pord Motor company,
has resigned his offices, chus creating
a considerable sensation in financial
circles.
The direct cause offered for ,he res-
ignation was disagreement with the
policy of Mr. Henry Ford, wbo in pub-
lic utterances has advocated unpre-
paredness for 'war.
The trouble had been rankling for
several days and was not a surprise
to those who were permitted to know
the inside of the story. Mr. Couzens
states that he will keep his interest
in the company, which is now well
into the millions. The Ford directors
will hold a meeting tomorrow.
Tuft Talks in Favor of Six-Year Term
New York, Oct. 12.-In an address
made today at Columbia university,
ex-Presideat Taft advocated the tstab-
lishment of a six-year presidential
term, a definite budget and increased
power of the president to vote. He
says that a six-year term is advisable
in that it will increase the efficiency

student" .anager Announces : [e Who
MIade Christmas Trip Not Re-
quired to rfyout
'RIP 'THROL'(Gh NORT1WEST
TAKEN FASTER VACATION
TANY OPENINGS FOR MEN IWHO
HAVE WORK OV SPECIAL
NATURE ,31R1
Official tryo>.. :,f arsity Glee
lub will be held at 7:00 o'clock Fri-
ay evening at the school of music.
tudent Manager D. R. Ballentine, '16,
as announced that all men who madec
he Christmas trip with the combined
lubs will be placed on the club with-l
ut again trying for their positions.
all others, whether making the spring,
,rip or not, must appear Friday even-
ng for the tryout.
Manager Ballentine is arranging
or an extensive trip through the
orthwest during Easter vacation, and
ntends taking as large a number with
he club as~possible. Plans for this
year include a concert to be given1
early in December by the combined
clubs in Hill auditorium. The pro-
grams which will be rendered will
be of an entirely different character
from anything that has heretofore
been offered.
Owing to graduation, there is a
scarcity of men who have specialty
work to offer, and for this reason men
with ability along this line will be
given a greater opportunity for mak-
ing the club. Any men with special-
ties should appear at the school of
music Friday night.
Tryouts for the mandolin club will
be held the first part of next week,
the exact time and place of which
will be announced later.
MIHIGAN GGIES TOHAE
COOAL RECEPTION EE
Council Plans to Meet Eleven With
Band and Escort Them to
IIeadqnarters
Michigan Aggies will receive a cor-
dial reception when they come to Ann
Arbor for the annual football clash
with the Wolverine squad a week
from Saturday, according to plans
drawn up by the student council at its
meeting last night.
Arthur V. Moninger, '15A, was ap-
pointed chairman of a reception com-
mittee to arrange for receiving the M.
A. C. contingent. The Michigan Var-
sity band will meet the Aggies' eleve
at the station and escort them to their
headquarters, according to the plans
of the council, but no way of meeting
the rootrs seems possible, as they
will come into Ann Arbor on three
different railroads.
Henry Rummel, '16L, was appointed
chairman of a committee to consider
the advisability of a celebration and
special attraction after the eornel
game. The subject of class elections
which is under the jurisdiction of th
council, was brought up. It was de
cided to arrange all the class elec
tions for this week in order that th
names of all class officers might b
printed in the Official Students' Di
rectory. The council passed a new
ruling that after nominations for clas
offices had been made, the eligibilit
of all candidates must be verified be

fore their names can appear on clas
ballots.

ONLY HALF% F MEN CANVASSING
H AVE 'WIINED IN FULL
REPORT
WORKERS AVERAGE NINE MEN
Effecite Enthusiasm Talks by Yost
and Others Account for Ex-
cellent Work
With five-sixths of the fraternities
still to be heard from, and with re-
ports from only half of the men who
canvassed last night turned in, nearly
as many members of the Y. M. C. A.
had been secured as in the similar
one-night campaign. of last year.
Twenty-nine men who reported at the
'Y" last night turned in a total of 263
memberships. President Lewis Rei-
mann, '16, headed the list as most suc-
cessful canvasser with a record of 29
memberships from 30 men canvassed.
W. 0. R. Johnson, '17, was close in
pursuit of the record with 2 mem-
berships secured
Many other mien reported more than
the 15 memberships which was the
standard set for each man, and the
average turned in was 9 to the man.
Many of the canvassers had partially
completed canvasses which they are
going back to finish up, and on ac-
count of the fact that some of the ter-
ritory has been absolutely untouched
as yet because not all of the commit-
tee men turned out, the canvass will
be extendTd quietly until all of .the
campus has had a chance to hear
about the proposition.
The average of memberships per
man is much higher than that of last
year, and the committee accounts for
this fact by the way in which the
speakers at the opening banquet were
able to stir up enthusiasm. Coach F.
Hl. Yost, J. Fred Lawton and Earl Pin-
(Continued on Page Six)
GEN.ZATA SIDES
WITH NEW RULERS"-
Schools Closed and Parade held to
Celebrate Recognition of Car-
rauza by United States
FIRM. 1OVE RN)IENU IS ASSURED
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 12.-General
Juan Zapata, in a statement made
here today, renounced his allegiance
to General Vil . He and all his troops
_ have deserted in favor of Carranza,
the official head of the Mexican gov-
ernment.(
Sincetthe downfall of,Huerta, Zap-
ata, Villa and Carranza have all been
considered possible conquerors in
Mexico, and the determination of Zap-
ata to ally himself and his forces
should materially aid the establish-
ment of a firm Constitutionalist gov-
e ernment.
d onzales Uses Aeroplanes
r Mexico City, Oct. 12.-Because of
d his inability to cope with the opposing
l forces in the mountains, General Gon-
zales, one of Carranza's commanders,
e will make an attempt to unseat their
positions by the use of aeroplanes. He
- has an aerial squadron of seven ma-
e chines which he intends to . send
e against the enemy in the coming 'cam-
- paign. In order to see that the ma-
w chines are in good working condition,
s trial flights were made over the city
y today.
- In celebration of the recognition of

Carranza by the United States and the
(Contmnued on Page Six)

BULGARIA9N TROOPS, BEGIN 1HOLD COMEDY CLUBi
MOVMENT ON SERBIANS~ TESTS TOMORROW
Russians and British Forces Fight, ---
Foes Together on Balkan IApplicants Will Give Selections of
Battle Fields Their Own Choosing in
Francais Rooms -
SERBS OFFER ?MUCH RESISTANCE

F.7R<RiR3iJ E/. 1. ii.AL AyxUllRA 14Rl KII&O I lxilILA"

TOI)AY
Michigan Library association meets,
Alumni Memorial hall.
Fresh assembly, engineering building,
11:00 o'clock.
Football, Marietta vs. Michigan, Ferry
Field, 4:05 o'c!Jci.
Prof. T. E. Rankin speak:, Y. W, C. A.,
4:30 o'clock.
Forestry club meeting, room 216, new
science building, 7:30 o'clock.
Fresh mass meeting, west physics lec-
ture room, 7:00 o'clock.
University Symphony try-outs, School
of Music, 7:30 oclock.
Band rehearsal, U hall, 7:00 o'clock.
(Bring racks.)
TOMORROW
Northwestern, club meets, Michigan
Unioh, 7:00 o'clock.
Comedy Club tryouts, Cercle Francais
rooms, 4:00 o'clock.
Soph mass meeting, west physics lec-
ture room, 7:00 o'clock.
University Symphony tryouts, School
of Music, 7:00 o'clock.
C. R. UInderhill lectures, engineering
room, 8:00 o'clock.
Greek and Latin students' reception,
Memorial hall, 8:00 o'clock.

Paris, Oct. 12.-Bulgaian troops
have begun the invasion of Serbia by
moving toward Nish and the railroad5
between that city and Saloniki. Au.-
tro-German arms have taken two1
points southeast and southwesttof
Belgrade, Semendria and Pazarevac.
In a message received at the French
capital today, it is stated that Russian,
and British will fight shoulder to
shoulder against the central powers
on the Balkan battlefields tomorrow.
Confidence is expressed that there are
enough allied troops to take care of
the situation there, 300,000 Russians
having arrived in Serbia, but the dis-
patch does not say how they got there.-
Petrograd, Oct. 12.-The imperial!
officials have just instituted measures
for the establishment of a new tax in
celebration of the 3001h anniversary
of the house of Romanof. The tax
will from 1 to 20 kopecs or / to 10
cents per capita.
Federal Board Disregards Suggestion
Washington, Oct. 12.-The Federal
Reserve Board today turned down the
suggestion made by President Wood-
row Wilson and supported by Secre-
tary McAdoo, for the establishment of
joint agencies of the federal banks in.
the Central and South American
states.

PRESENT COMEDY, "STOP THIEF"c
Active preparations for this year's
work will be commenced by the Com-j
edy club at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow af-
ternoon in the Cercle Francais rooms,
when tryouts will be held with a view
of determining the personnel of the
organization for the coming season.
Applicants will be required to give
recitals of selections of their own
choosing, not to exceed three min-
utes in length. It is planned to se-
lect about eight men, although that
number may be increased or decreas-
ed, according to the showing made by
the tryouts.
tWork on this year's annual pro-
duction, "Stop Thief," a modern light
comedy of a more popular nature than
has ever before been presented by the
club, will be started immediately af-
ter the selection of the new men, ac-
cording to President J. S. Switzer,
'16, who expects the arrival of the
manuscript from New York inside of
a few days.
The club is planning to give month-
ly productions in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, in order to give those mcm-
bers who do not take actual part in
"Stop Thief," a chance to demonstrate
their worth. Freshipen are eligible
for membership in the club.

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of the chief executive.
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FRESHMEN.. . . . FREE
Get your tickets before
Thursday noon at New-
berry Hall

Y. . C. A. BANQVET

Freshn

an- Night
Friday, Oct. 15, 6 o'clock

Upper Class Girls - 35 Cents
Get your tickets to-day
at the Library or
at Newberry Hall

11,

Newberry Hall

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