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January 23, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

M
Z 2
7
A

Phones :-Ed itorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY TEN
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 83.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1916.'

PRICE FIVE CENTS

CLl MEETING OF
MEN EXPERIENCED
IN MILITARY DRILL

Y carY,
Sv 3 .'os

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tX ('AS _ RiL' x'T 1 "AWML
i:i l~i ' W4 L L !

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FRESH LITS WIL
GOMENE MDNDAY
S iYn Mlt Valuable Advise.
:SLh-1FL"H ( ! 'tIi SIXNG
t thc; fres1:h-Mit s:cmbly at 4:00
I o'c'oc"= Monday afterncon in the Au-
ditc1i tun of Univcrsity all, Professor
C. 0. Davis of thi literary college
will snea n "How to Save Time."
'Ihe uestio of how to get the mwort
work from the least tine has bothered
J hrs besdl es student;. ie is a prac-

140 SUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE
Members of Selmte COiniittee Will
He f itire Commissioned Offi-
ee s at nion
A mtctin of all stuidentt .intrest-
cd in military training, and espcially
those whose previous experience has
tended ,to qualify them for commis-
sions, will be convened at the Union
Tuesday evening at 7:00 o'clock. The
meeting is being called by the senate
committee on military training to take
care of difficulties likely to arise in
the future.
In the event that the board of re-
gents vote to introduce military train-
ing into, the university on the plan
proposed by the university senate, a
special difficulty will be encountered
in providing the necessary cadet offi-
cers for the first year. After military
training has been in regular opera-
tion; the cadet officers are selected
from among those who have had
training during the preceding years.
A preliminary examination of the en-
rollment cards shows that there are
at least 140, and the number is prob-
ably much larger, who have had mil-
itary training at some other institu-
tion before entering the University of
Michigan. It is from this body of
students that the cadet officers of
higher rank would be chosen after
examination by the Commandant. For
this reason these members of the stu-
dent body have been asked by postal
card notice to meet the members of
the senate committee on military
(Continued on Page Six))
TER MEN SURVIVE FINAL
MID-WESTDEBATE TRYOUT
Contest Comes March 31 Against Wis-
consin and Illinois; Men Work
on Material
The final tryout for the Mid-West
debate was held yesterday afternoon
in the oratory room. Out of the 10
men who survived the second cut, the
following two teams of three men each
and an alternate were selected: The
affirmative team composed of W. T.
Adams, '17, R. S. Munter, '17L, I. S.
Toplon, 17, and S. D. Frankel, '17L,
as alternate. The negative team is
composed of G. C. Claassen, '17L, N. E.
Olds, '16, K. Stevens, '16L, and H. H.
Springstun, '17, as the alternate. The
Mid-West debate is to be held on
March 31.
The Michigan affirmative team de-
bates Wisconsin here and the nega-
tive team debates Illinois at Cham-
pagne. Claassen is the only man on
the negative who has represented
Michigan against Wisconsin.
The question to be under discussion
is: "Resolved, that the Federal Gov-
ernment should own and operate all
public service telephone and telegraph
lines in the United States, constitu-
tionality waived."
ILLNESS OF HENRY JAMES
SHOWS TURN FOR WORSE
London, Jan. 22.-Henry James, the
American author who took the oath
of allegiance as a British subject last
year, has been seriously ill for sev-
eral months and his physicians state
that his condition is not improving.
The chronic disease from which he
suffers has been complicated by two
light strokes of apoplexy. Mr.
James' physicians ceased issuing bul-
letins several weeks ago.

{
'

GROVER, HYATT, DAVIS AND WILSON,
Varsity Quartet Which Will Sing at J-llop Concert

PIANIWoCO*NCERT FOR
JUNIOR HOP GUESTS

Combined Glee and Mandolin Clubs
Entertain With Former Hits
and New Material

to

VARSITY QUARTET WILL

SING

Another entertainment for those at-
tending the J-Hop has been arranged
by the combined Glee and Mandolin
clubs, who will give a concert on Fri-
day afternoon, February 11, from 4:00
to 5:00 o'clock, in University Hall.
The program follows:
1. (a) Victors................ Elbel
(b) Varsity...............Moore
Combined Clubs
2. Mandolin Club Trio .... Selections
3. (a) Wild Rose .............Dubois
(b) Swing Along ...............
...............Will Marion Cook
4. Varsity Glee Club Quartet-.....
................... Selections
5. (a) Serenade..........Moszkowski
(b) Turkish Towel Rag
Mandolin Club
6. Yellow and Blue
Combined Clubs
Reserved seats will be sold at 50
cents and may be secured by mail
order from D. R.* Ballentine, '16, 773
S. State street. Unreserved seats in
the balcony will be sold for 25 cents.
The general ticket sale will begin on
Monday, February 7, when tickets will
be on sale in one of the book stores.
RUSSIANS CAPTURE TOWN
OF SULTANABAD IN TURKEY
Teheran, Persia, Jan. 22.-Russian
columns operating in Persia have
pushed to and occupied the town of
Sultanabad, 150 miles southwest of
Teheran and about an equal distance
northwest of Ispahan. The garrison
and the German consul have fled to
Bouroudjir, 50 miles west of Sultana-
bad.

COUMEDY CLUB TO
STAGE PRODUCTON~
"The Professor's Love Story," Will Be
Played for J-Hoppers and
at Saginaw
CORDIAL RECEPTION EXPECTED
Arrangements have been made with
the Saginaw alumni association for
the production of the Comedy Club
play, "The Professor's Love Story,"
at the Academy theater in Saginaw on
Friday evening, February 18. Six
days prior to this performance the
play will be given as a J-Hop week
attraction at the Whitney theater,
Saturday afternoon, February 12.
Wallace Craig Smith, president of
the Saginaw alumni association, has
appointed Harold Allington, Clement
J. Quinn, Jerome Weadock, and Cyril
Quinn, of the Saginaw alumni, as a
committee on arrangements to plan
for the play's reception there.
For the J-Hop week matinee at the
Whitney, only $1.00 will be asked for
the best seats, with the remainder of
the orchestra floor and the balcony
going at 75 and 50 cents.
U. S. Workers May Strike
Watertown, Mass., Jan. 22. - A
strike by machinists employed at the
government arsenal here is said by
representatives of the men to be prob-
able unless an advance in wages is
granted. Telegrams setting forth
their grievances were sent to mem-
bers of congress yesterday by Mau-
rice W. Bowen, a representative of
the machinists' union. Bowen said
that in a recent adjustment of wages
by the ordnance department only 32
of the 190 machinists at the arsenal
received an increase in pay.
"Why didn't you go out for track
practice yesterday instead of going to
see Gladys?"
"Oh, a miss is as good as a mile any
day."

SasyColoi St, and thinks he has
O sceovcrcd a system which will be of
imesti'mbile adivsan.tae to the average
undergraduate, and especially to the
first year mai.
In addition to the talk by Professor
Davis, the All-Fresh Glee Club will
render a few selections. Their ap-
pearance at the last assembly was the
eccasion of prolonged applause and
repeated requests for encores, which
they were unable to supply. Under
the coaching of P. A. Hartesveldt, '16,
the Club has improved and feel con-
fident of giving a good account of
themselves.
ORATORICAL PLAY
TICKETS ON SALE
Excellent Cast and Popularity of "The
Servant in the House," Ensures
Big Attendance
TICKETS ON SALE AT WAHR'S
The seat sale for Kennedy's play,
"The Servant in the House," to be
given in University Hall Thursday/
night, will begin tomorrow morning,
and considering the popularity of the
play and the excellent cast it is ex-
pected that this year's production will
draw a larger crowd than any other
previous production.
The tickets can be secured at Wahr's
bookstore from'9:00-12:00 and 2:00-
5:00 o'clock, and daily thereafter from
2:00-5:00 o'clock. They will go on sale
at the popular prices of 25, 35, and 50
cents.
With the exception of a few finish-
ing touches the play is already in final
form and perhaps no other cast has
been able to reach such a finishedl
stage at such an early date. Begin-
ning tomorrow, however, daily dress
rehearsals will be held until the night
of the play.
Allies Corner on Grain
Bucharest, Jan. 22.-An Anglo-
French corporation with a capital of
about $96,000,000, has been formed to
buy up all available grain, so the cen-
tral powers will be unable to import
needed supplies. It is not known what
use will be made by the allies of the
proposed purchases.
American Legion in War
Vancouver, B. C., Jan. 22.-Fifty-
three Americans recruited for the
Ninety-seventh Canadian regiment,
which is to be composed entirely of
citizens of the United States and to be
known as the American legion, en-
trained for Toronto today to join the
regiment.

Man

JOSEPH ROBBINS
"Y" S PEAKERTODAY

WAR PICTURES TO BE SHOWN
Joseph C. Robbins, candidate secre-
tary of the Student Volunteer move-
ment of New York City, will speak at
the "Y" meeting in the Arcade The-
atre this evening at 6:30 o'clock.
Joseph C. Robbins, a graduate of
Brown University, '98, has enjoyed a
varied career. He has gained experi-
ence as a miner, soldier, world trav-
eler, missionary and statesman.
For the last five years, Mr. Robbins
has been connected with the Student
Volunteer movement in various capaci-
ties. He is at present interested in
showing college men and women the
opportunities for service in foreign
fields.
As an introduction to the big meet-
ing, free war pictures will be shown in
the theatre beginning at 6:10 o'clock.

of Varied Career to Speak
Opportunities Offered
Student4

of

SWISS TELEGRAM
SAYS THAT ITALY'S
gCABINET REIGNS
1ONTENEQRiAN KING .LEAVES
!'OUNt'RY TO SET UP GOVERN-
MENT AT LYONS
RUSSIAN DRIVE COMMENCES
R sian Caucasian Army Begins As-
saalt on Erzerum, Principal City
of Turkish Armenia
Italian Cabinet Resigns
Zurich via Amsterdam and London,
Jan. 22.-The Neue Zuricher Nach-
richten says that the Italian cabinet
has resigned. Signor Luzatti, at pres-
ent administrator of the redeemed
provinces, has been chosen by King
Victor Emmanuel to succeed Premier
Salandra as head of the ministry, ac-
cording to the newspaper.
King Nicholas Flees to Lyons
Paris, Jan. 22.-King Nicholas has
fled from Montenegro and followed by
the Queen and other members of the
royal household to Lyons, where the
government is to be set up. The de-
fense of the hountry has been left en-
tirely to Prince Mirao, General Bou-
kotitch, the former Premier, and Gen-
eral Markinovitch.
Rome Denies Peace Rumor
Rome, Jan. 22.-The Montenegrin
Consul General stated tonight in
(Continued on Page Six)
AMIE01iCAN BALLAD
COLCO TALKS
Prof. John A. Lomax Will Speak on
Some Phase of American
Folk-Lore
GLEE CLUB SINGERS ON BIL
Prof. John A. Lomax, secretary of
the faculty of the University of Texas,
who will speak tomorrow evening at
8:00 o'clock in University hall, has
within a few years acquired a inter-
national reputation as a collector of
native American songs and ballads.
Until Mr. Lomax began his intetesting
study, the extent of the field of tolk-
lore in this country was never fully
realized. Any who had given the mat-
ter thought were prone to accredit all
the older ballads to foreign sources.
At the beginning of his work a stu-
pendous task confronted him, for not
a single word or note of any of these
songs had ever been conveyed to paper.
He was compelled to rely solely on
what bits of information he could pick
up here and there from those whose
early life had thrown them in contact
with the frontier communities.
Apropos of the migration of tales,
Professor Lomax relates that he ob-
tained the first line of one ballad in
Oklahoma, and finally after long
search chanced upon the second line
in the extreme tip of the state of Maine.
From such widely divergent sources
he has succeeded in gathering to-
gether a large number of complete
songs.
His first field of search was in the
West, where he collected and publish-
ed a volume of cowboy songs. He then
began a study of -negro plantation
songs, or "spirituals," which he col-

lected and published as he-had the
others.
In his lecture here, which will be
on some phase of the wider subject of
American folk-lore, he will be assist-
ed by members of the Glee club, who
will sing several songs from his col-
lection. The lecture is under the au-
spices of the Oratorical Association,
and the usual charge of 25 cents will
be made.

I:

.w eI

i

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

Weather: Continued fair and cold-
er; brisk westerly winds shifting to
north.
TODAY
Meeting-of J-Hop committee, Michigan
Union, 10:30 o'clock..
Menorah Society meets, 8:00 p. m.,
Newberry Hall. Election of officers.
Dr. Frank Gunsaulus lectures, Pres-
byterian church, 7:30 o'clock.
"Joe" Robbins speaks, "Y" meeting,
Arcade theater, 6:30 o'clock.
Menorah society election, Newberry
hall, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Meeting of J-Hop ticket holders for
booth sharing arrangements.
Michigan Dames meet, 7:30 o'clock,
Newberry Hall.
Fresh Lit Assembly, U Hall, 4:00
o'clock.
Independents' smoker to arirange for
J-Hop booths, Union, 7:15 o'clock.
Prof. John Lomax, U-Hall, 8:00 o'clock
Meeting to arrange for occupants of
J-Hop booths, Michigan Union, 7:15
o'clock.
Mrs. Ward, president of the Ann Arbor
Federation of Charities, speaks at
the social service meeting, Methodist
church, 7:00 o'clock.

U A

AT SIX-FIFTEEN TIlS EVENING A VESPER SERVICE WILL
11E HELD AT 'ITE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. SPECIAL
MUSIC WVIL BE FURNISHED BY A PROFESSIONAL QUAR-
T'ET. MR. DOUGLAS WILL MAKE BRIEF ADDRESS. OF
SPEC \A I N 'E RiEST T'I'( STUDENTS.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
STATE AND WASHINGTON STREETS
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
Morning Subject: The Fine Art of Receiving
Evening Subject: Winston Churchill's "A Far Country"
Quartette. Ada Grace Johnson, Alice Bliton,
Odra Patton, Stanley Wilson.

q U.

i..,-.

it

All Seats
Reserved
Popular
Prices
25c - 35c
50c

Co~r~t

"tTHE

SERVANT

IN

THE

HOUSE"

Seat Sale
Begins at
W alr' s
Tomorrow
9-12 a. m.
2-5 p. m.

CHAS. RANN KENNEDY'S MASTER PRODUCTION

THURSDAY, JAN. 27th

UNIVERSITY HALL

- M

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