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January 22, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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m

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t

Rings
Michigan Pins
Fobs

Spoons
Pendants Novelties
Lockets

11

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Matinees GARRICK ""
WednesdayWee o
and Sat. U~1IRl an. 17th
DETROIT
" A PAIR OF SIXES"
The Funniest FARCE
in the World

Parisian Ivory Leather Goods Silverware
Gold Pocket Knives Chains Pencils
FINE WATCH AND
JEWELRY REPAIRING
HALLER JEWE LRY CO.
State Street Jewelers

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\1

ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo, 6:3o, 8:oo, 9:30
Saturday, January 22-Irene Fen wick in
"The Sentimental Lady." Kleine fea-
ture. Also Part Fleven of "The Trip
Around the World" series.
Monday. Jan. 24-Robert Warwick in
"The Flash of an"'erald." World
return.
Tuesday, Jan. 25-" The Cowardly Way,"
a five part Equitable feature with
Florence Reed as the star.

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TODAY ATMAJETIC - "TONIGHTAT
3:00pg~.m. -734~

The Potash and Perl-HYMAN ADLER & CO. In "SOLOMON'S
in uter of vaudeville BARGAIN"
THE KILKENNY FOUR
6 - MILITARY DANCERS - 6
CALLOWAY AND ELLIOTT
EILER'S CIRCUS

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k

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Factory Hat Store
118 E. Huron St.

TAKE YOUR FRIENDS
TO TAE
CRYSTAL RESTAURANT
FOR
JiHOP MEALS

Breakfast, 6-10

Dinner, 11-2
Short Orders at All Hours

Supper. 4-8

IAILSOSDENE
TOUR OPENS ON 2
President to T''ake Stump First in
Pittsburg with Speech on
Preparedness

MUSIC WITH YOUR MEALS
601 East LIerty

RE(GINS SECOND )jfOU

FEB. 13

Washington, Jan. 21-President
Wilson formally will open his fight
for national preparedness with a
speech in Pittsburg January 29..
This has been decided upon by the
president, whose itinerary for the first
tour he will take to outline his na-
tional defense program before the
country virtually had been completed;
today._
The president plans to leave here a,
week from today, and in addition to
Pittsburg the itenerary calls for
speeches at Cleveland, Chicago, St.
Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph, Des
Moines and Davenport.
Plans for the president's second
tour, to begin about February 15, are
under consideration. He probably
will go at far west as Denver, and
may return through the south, making
stops at Birmingham and other cities.
I'ENN WATER POLO CHANCES
HINGE ON PRINCETON GAME
Princeton, Jan. 21.-The prospects
of Princeton winning their fifth conl-
secutive championship in water polo
are poor this year in view of the
showing made so far. At present
Pennsylvania is'considered the most
likely contestant for that honor. If
they should win the game with Prince-
tan tomorrow night; the title will be
won by an entirely new team this sea-
son. Penn recently defeated Colum-
bia with a team composed of regulars
from last year's squad.
Using the Penn plays in the prac-
tice held last night, the scrub totalled
15 points before the Varsity scored.
Later, the Varsity taking the same
plays, easily defeated the, scrub team.
Course in Military Medicine at Harvard
A course in military medicine in the
Harvard Graduate School of Medicine
has been authorized by the Harvard
Corporation.
We print Anything, fromn your Name
on a Card' to a Book. The Ann Arbor
Press. (*)
Good Printing-The Ann Arbor Press.

It%)HflS EXPRESSES His OPIN.
1]WANS ON GARVaOYtE 'NUMBER
(Cont.ined front Pag One)
Ldison company, is excellently lo-
cated for purposes of a military camp.
It is high, well-drained, and a portion
of it extends in a level plateau which
i"', exceptionally well adapted for the
laying out of company streets, or for
the location of a drill ground.
Professor Hobbs in now in communi-
cation with the department of war in
an effort to find out whether the gov-
ernment would furnish the required
number of tents, and what other aid
night be expected in case the project
for compulsory military training in the
university succeeds. If the war de-
partment will furnish tents and other
equipment necessary, an excellent op-
portunity will be afforded for the es-
tablishment of a summer camp, as the
location of the tract is ideal for the
purpose.,
With regard to the general question
of military /training in the colleges,.
Professor Hobbs called attention to the
recent testimony of Major-General
Wood before;the Senate committee on
military affairs, indicating one para-
graph in particular as having a pecu-
liar bearing on this problem. The
paragraph follows: "A vital factor in
the present situation, he (General
Wood) told the coimmittee, was the
necessity of building up an officers'
reserve corps. With 40,000 students
in the land grantcolleges under mili-
tary training, and every important
higher educational institution organ-
izing officers' training units, he
thought it would be an easy thing to
buildup the force of 50,000 reserve
officers necessary."
"The great value of military train-
lmg in the colleges," said Professor
Hobbs, "lies in the fact that in case
of war we would have a large body
of trained men who would be compe-
tent, with a little additional, instruc-
tion, to step out and act as officers for
the volunteers. An overwhelming
number of officers, thoroughly trained
in their calling, has been the secret of
Germany's success in this war."
U S. PEACE ENVOYS TO
GO TO STOCKHOILM TODAY
(Continued frot Page One)
tees have nominated their candidates
and alternates for membership of the
neutral conmerence and the Dutch

committee will make their appoint-
ments today.
After being detained for nearly a
week by German military authorities
who had refused permission to cross
Germany, 33 Scandinavian members
of the Ford peace expedition have
reached their homes. Their deten-
tion, besides being extremely annoy-
ing to all Scandinavians, caused par-
ticular hardship to several who had
duties to perform at home.
Carl Lindhagen, mayor of Stock-
holm, and senior member of the
Swedish parliament, was forced to miss
five of the only six days in the
year during which he may introduce
bills in the Swedish parliament. Mr.
Bergman, of Stockholm, was forced to
miss an important series of lectures
at the university. Mrs. Elizabeth Wae-
ren Bugge, who had just been ap-
pointed to a responsible position, was
unable to begin her duties.
Mr. Bondo, secretary of the Dan-
ish delegation, was needed for a posi-
tion recently conferred on him in
Iceland and now sees his inability
to obey a call from the government.
Fanny Schnelle, town councillor, of
Bergen, learned that her beautiful old
home was destroyed in the Bergen
fire and that her mother had been
in serious danger from the flames,
but was fortunately rescued.
T. W. SWAN CHOSEN DEAN OF
YALE LAW SCHOOL THIS MONTH
Cambridge, Jan. 21.-At its January
meeting the Yale Corporation elected
Thomas Walter Swan, LL.B. '03 (Yale
1900), professor of law and, dean of
the Yale law school, to succeed Pro-
fessor H. W. Rogers. The new dean
graduated from the Harvard law
school with distinction, being both
marshal of his class and editor-in-
chief of the Law Review. He was en-
gaged with Professor J. H. Beale, '82,
in organizing the law department of
the University'of Chicago, and has
since been engaged in private practice.
To Add Three Million to Cornell Fund
It is planned to add $3,000 to the
endowment fund of Cornell University
in honor of the semi-centennial an-
niversary of the founding of the col-
lege which will be celebrated in Oc-
tober, .1918. Plans for the celebra-
tion are already being considered.
Call Lyndon for a good flashlight.

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