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January 22, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-22

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I
THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

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Plones:-Editorial .414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. 'XXVI. No. 82.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

t

TEUTONIC ALLIES
SON TO LAUNCH
EGYPT CAMPAI6N
HINTS ]ROPPEI) BY KAISER AT
NISH INDICATE EARLY
. % ATTACK
WANT BARATONG RETAI!ATION
Italian Liner Reports Activlties of
U-Boats in Mediterranean
on Docking
Amsterdam, Jan. 21.-Kaiser Wil-
liam dropped a broad hint that the
Turco-German campaign against Suez
and Egypt would begin soon, in his
address at Nish, where he conferred
decorations on Czar Ferdinand of
Bulgaria band Crown Prince Boris.
"We have been challenged by our
enemies, who envy Germany anfd Aus-
tria their peaceful flourishing pros-
perity," said the Kaiser. "In the
most lighthearted manner they have
endangered the development of the
whole of Europe in order to fight us,
but our loyalty as allies has been the
root of our strength.
"We have had a hard fight which
(Continued on Page Six)
JOLIET I UNDER,
T O ATER

Thousand Persons Are Driven
Their Homes When Des
Plaines Overflows

from1

NO CASUALTIES YET REPORTED
Joliet, Ill., Jan. 21.-Tlie worst floodf
since 1902 ingulfed Joliet today. Water
ran five feet deep in the streets.
Nearly a thousand persons were driv-
en from their homes.
Rockdale, a manufacturing town, re-
ported six feet of water on the level
and business suspended.
The whole valley of the Des Plaines
river is inundated.
No casualties have been reported.?
The loss was estimated at several
hundred thousand dollars in several
blocks.
Police. and firemen rescued many
families in rowboats from houses
where the water was too deep to wade.
GREAT WARSIPTo FLY
1NA1R NOWBEING BUILT'
Superdreadnought Will Be Sent to One
of Belligerent Powers; Can
Carry Crew of 30
New York, Jan. 21.-An aerial sup-
erdreadnought that is being built in
a factory in the United States for use
by one of the belligerent powers of
Europe is described by Alberto San-
tos-Dumont, the aeronaut, as six times-
larger than any yet tried, and is ca-
pable of cruising more than 600 miles
at a speed of 75 miles an hour, with
a crew of 30.
The power plant consists of six
160-horse power motors and one of
40 horsepower.
With about eight Ipssu gers it can
carry oil and gasoline weighing 5,250
pounds and a load ot f.0 0 pounds of
ummunition.
It is armored in all vital spots and
is designed to arry te new aeroplane
guns projeing iui cotiinetre shells.
NE1 ,SItM FOVR LAW EXAMS
AROUSES INTEBEST ON CAMPUS
A great deal of interest is being
iken by faculty and students of all-
departments in the coming law ex-
aminations, since they will be under
new system, the success of which
will mean a very great change, most
probably, in the manner of holding
examinations for the entire university.
The law school holds sessions until the
day before the examinations begin,
with ,the intention of forcing the stu-
dents to review throughout the se-

Taft Says Teddy
Will Lose In Race
BelievesRooseveltWould Bea1eq
if Ile Were to Head Ticket
of epublitmus
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Jan. 21.-"With'
Roosevelt on the Republican ticket I
would not hesitate to say that the
Republican party would be beaten,,,
said former President William Howard
Taft when interviewed today by the
press board %f Vassar college.
"With Mr. Whitman as the Presi-
dential candidate it would be hard
to tell what the result would be. It
would be the same if Mr. Hughes were
nominated but evidently he does not
want it. I am not only beaten out of
the race but I am kept out of it."
Mr. Taft said that although Presi-
dent Wilson minimized the question
of prepaiedness a year ago he made
it the. chief subject of his message
this year. He declared that he be-
lieved it would be difficult to put Mr.
Wilson's plans in operation, saying
that it would tak $200,000,000 to car-
ry them out.
Mr. Taft said that a large navy was
the most important feature of national
preparedness plans.
Only Five J-Hop
Tickets Stll Left
Decide to Hold Open Sale for Short
Time to Allow Accommodations
for Chaperones
Only five tickets for the J-Hop are
left from the last day's sale, held yes-
terday. Owing to the fact that some.
of the fraternities and house clubs
have not definitely decided as to the
number of chaperones for their house
parties, it has been decided that the
sale of these tickets will be held open
for a short time. Any one desiring
either one of these five tickets that
are left from the regular sale, or
chaperone tickets, may call Earl Par-
dee at 1166, and leave their applicatio
Is Not Confirmed
Miitary Authorities Have No Knowl-
edge as to How Report
Was Started
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 21.-Governor
Nacio Emriquez of the state of Chi-
huahua arrived at Juarez this after-
noon accompanied by his staff.
"I came here to organize the civil
government of the State of Chihuahua
on the border." Governor Emriquez
said of the report of Villa's capture:
"I have no knowledge as to how the
report started and I have had no con-
firmation of it." The military author-
ities are trying to get news from their
outlying commands.
The governor declared that a cam-
paign against General Benjamin Ar-
gunedo and his allied forces was about
to be launched by some 4,000 men, un-
der personal command of General
Brebino, who has left Chihuahua City
for Torreon to assume direction of the
military forces against Argunedo.
Speakers Attack
Naval Weakness

Speakers at National Security (,on-
gress (Criticize Navy and
Those Responsible
Washington, Jan. 21.-Broadsides of
criticism were aimed against the navy,
the naval system, and those respons-
ible for it by speakersbeforedthe Na-
tional Security Congress today.
George von L. Meyer, former sec-
retary of the navy, asserted that in-
creasing appropriations would do no
good until the basic faults, one of
proper organization and lack of per-
sonnel, were remedied.
Charles E. Curtiss, president of the
International Curtiss Marine Turbine
company, criticized the secretary of
the navy for putting forth inaccurate
statements regarding the cost of build-
ing battleships at the navy yards and
private plants and suggested an in-
vestiEation of the nroblem.

HOBBS EXPRESSES
HIS OPINIONS ON
GARGOYLENUMBER'
CLAIMS PUBLICATION LACKED AN,
ADEQUATE KNOWLEDGE OF ;
' ~THE FACTS;
AGAI NST CLASS DISCUSS ION
Michigt Man Offers Tract of Land
for Use of University if Mill-
tary Training Is Adopted
In airinterview yesterday afternoon,
Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the Geology
department, in commenting on the,
:military training issue of the Gargoyle,
expressed the opinion that that pub-,
lication, in intimating that he was in
the habit of using his classroom as a
means of propagatng his ideas in re-
gard to military training, was acting
beyond its authority, and without any-
adequate knowledge of the facts.
1hProfessor Hobbs strongly condemned
the practice of using the classroom
for the purpose of expressing partisan
ideas -in regard to the war. He as-
serted that although he understood
that this was done in other classrooms,
he himself had been most careful to
'abstain from any word or action which
would afford students the slightest
opportunity to draw any such conclu-
sions.
He intimated that a full and free
discussion of the subject of military
training was at all times to be encour-
aged, but he did not regard the class-
room as the proper place to carry on
such discussion. .
In regard to the Gargoyle, he re-
marked, "I do not consider the attack
personal, but the Gargoyle is speaking
without a knowledge of the facts. I
am afways very careful to exclude all
matters of partisan interest from my
classroom. Entirely aside from facul-
ty regulations in that regard, I, per-
sonally, do not approve of that way of
doing."
Discussing the prospects for mili-
tary training at Michigan, Professor
Hobbs announced that Mr. W.rE Us-
derdown, manager of the Huron Farms
company, has consented, in case mili-
tary "training is adopted, to allow the
university the use of a large tract of
unimproved land situated near what
is known as the Blake farm, about
fwo miles down the Huron river. This
lend, now controlled by the Huron
Farms company, an adjunct to the
(Continued on Page Six)
YUN' CORONTION IS
STOPPED BY UPRISING,

Military Number
Has Largest Sale
Only a Fe1nCop (lies Ava~ilble at Va-
rions News Stands
All previous sales records or the
Cargoyle were broken yesterday when
the Military Training issue was prac-
tically sold out within a few hours,
after its first appearance. Last night
no copies were available except a,
small number in various news stands.
The business staff reports the campus
sale to belarger than ever before, 250
copies having been sold in less than
.0 minutes during the period between
the 10 and 11 o'clock classes.
The issue really taken on the na-
ture of a philippic, -but the sarcasm
contains no touch of acrimony, and
the satire, being of the most genial
sort, in no way mars the general ef-
fect. A high standard of excellence in
both art and general reading matter,
combined with the discrimination
shown in selection of exchanges, un-
doubtedly form the basis for the great,
popularity which this number has won.,
DEAN LLOY MAKES
CLUBOOMPLANS
(.diate Department Will Try to Se-
cure Social Center for Grad-
nate Students
HAS BEEN PROVEN SUCCESSFUL1
Tentative plans ,are being made by
Dean Lloyd of the graduate depart-
ment to secure clubrooms for the use
of graduate students, which it is hoped
will fill a long-felt want in the social
line. Separate rooms will be pro-
vided for the men and for the women,
if the plan proves feasible, and a
recreation center will be established,
it is hoped, which will enable the stu-
dents of the department to meet often-
er and get to know each other better.
"The plan has proved a tremendous
success in other large universities,
notably Harvard, Columbia and Chi-
cago," said Dean Lloyd. "Of course
the one at Harvard makes no provi-
sion for women, since there are none
in the department.
"There is an immediate need for
something &f this kind," he continued.
"1 hope to procure temporary quarters
of some kind until something more
permanent can be arranged for. Ev-
entually, 1 think, rooms can be had
in the new Michigan Union building,
but that is anticipating a little.
"The rooms will serve as a read-
ing room and general meeting center.
When we get in the Union quarters
perhaps coffee and a light lunch could
be served. Receptions could be held
and at convenient times little depart-
ment gatherings of various kinds.
"At present there is very little so-
cial life among the students of this
department. Most of them are not
living at home, and so feel the need
of some kind of social diversion and
relaxation. And since they are older
than the general run of undergradu-
ates, and not quite so intimately con-
nected with student activities, their
pleasures must necessarily be differ-
ent."
BLOOD TRANSFUSION SUCCESS
Method Used in the Restoration of
Life of Chicago Gas
VictimI

VRSITY DEBATING TEAM CONQUERS

NORTHWESTERN I
DECISION OF i
* OF THREE BIf DEBA'TES
F~Reports received at TIhe
* mieligan Daily ofice' late lst
* night indicate that Chicago *
* came out vitorious in two of *
* the three Central league de- *
bates. *
The Midway orators conuier- *
ed Michigan in a close contest *
iat Mandel hall in Chicago and *
* also defeated Northwestern at *
Evanston. No details other than
* the decisions were obtainable. *
* With the defeat of Northwest- *
er at Ann Arbor,. Michigan *
* broke een, while the Evans- *
* ton university lost its two con-*
o tests. *
S*
SELECT EDITORS'
Of '16 YER BOOK
Choosing of Representatives from Each
Departmient Has Proven to
Be Effective
I1T 1DEPARTMENT HAS THREE
At the meeting of the board in con-
trol of student publications held yes-
terday, the following seniors were se-
lected from the various departments
to act as associate editors of the 1916
Michiganensian:
Engineering - Humphrey M. K.
Grylls, Gordon D. Cooke.
Literary--Muriel M. Tyson, Edward
P. Wright, Irwin C. Johnson.
Combined courses--E. S. Thornton,
Homeop.
Law-John F, Scott, Clarence H.
Swain son.
Medicine-Sam W. Donaldson.
This action is in accordance with the
usual custom of choosing one or two
men from each department to work in
conjunction with the managing editor
n producing the annual. In past years
this practice has been found very ef-
fective, since it enables the staff to
get in close touch with the work of
the different departments.
U, S, PECE ENOYS Td
G O TO STOCKHOLM TODA
Delegates Consigned to Pass Through
German Territory in
Sealed Car
The Hague, Jan. 21.-American
members and alternates of the reutral
peace conference, who had their prep-
arations for departure made several
days ago and had been awaiting a
ruling by the German authorities, will
leave here at noon today for Stock-
holm. They will pass through German
territory in a sealed car.
The Scandinavian electing commit-
(Continued on Page Six)

CLOSE GONTEST;
IDGES TWO TO ONE
OUT OF 16 DEBATES WITH INSTI-
TUTION MICHIGAN HAS NINE
TO HER CREDIT
NEW SYSTEM PROVES SUCCESS
Teams Closely Balanced in Argument;
Michigan Speakers Superior
' in Delivery
Continuing her established record in
forensic activities, the University of
Michigan won a closely contested de-
bate from Northwestern university in
:Hill auditorium last night by a split
decision, two judges voting for the
affirmative of the literacy test ques-
tion, supported by Michigan, and one
casting his ballot for the negative,
as advanced by Northwestern.
The teams were closely balanced in
the argument they advanced, but the
Michigan speakers undoubtedly were
superior in presentment,. due to their
forceful, direct and earnest delivery.
Interest in the contest was height-
ened by th-e fact that a win for the
Methodists would even up the score
between the two schools. Last night's
debate was the sixteenth meeting be-
tween them, and the victory was the
ninth for the supporters of the Maize
and Blue.
* The debate was the first given under
the new method of allowing all stu-
dents free admission to university
forensic contests and 2000 were pres-
ent to welcome the inauguration of the
system. The presence of the band add-
ed additional interest.
W. M. Brucker, '16L, opened the case
for the affirmative. He pointed out
the change which had taken place in
the immigration problem and proposed
a remedy, the literary test, Such a
test was shown to be in line with our
present policy of immigration, to be
sound and reasonablegand to be one
which would make the solution of our
problems easier.
The opening speech for the negative
was given by E. E. Voight, who con-
tended that such a test would judge °
a man not by his ability or usefulness
but by the opportunities for education
he had enjoyed and that its adoption
would discriminate against the deserv-
ing peasant class in favor of a ques-
tionable city population.
J R.-Cotton, '16, continued the af-
firmative case by showing literacy to
be a qualification which could be eas-
ily secured if the prospective immi-
grant possessed the ambition and
stamina to prepare himself for it, and
that literacy was desirable as it made
the immigrant more likely to be assim-
ilated. The negative contentions of
Charles D. Lowry demonstrated the
lack of connection between literacy
and character.
A. J. Stoddard, '17L, closed the af-
firmative case by citing the benefits to
(Continued on rage Six)
SPEAKS ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

Chinese Emperor Indefinitely
pones Ceremony as
Result

Post-

Pekin, Jan. 21.-The coronation of
Yuan Shi Kai as emperor of China has
been postponed indefinitely. The rea-
son given officially is the uprising in
southern China.
The foreign office notified the vari-j
ous .legations today that the Chinese
government had decided that the en-
thronement would take place early
in February, but that Yuan Shi Kai
had issued an order cancelling the
arrangements, in view of the dis-
turbances in Yunnan province. No
intimation was given when the en-
thronement will take place.
Government officials estimate that
not more than six months will be
recpuired to quiet the disturbances in
the south.
Hopewell, Va. l -er d- a gc
$100,000 was do b} t n
a 150,000-gallo
Pont company's r ,y-
ports had give, xx

t
z
E.

Chicago, Jan. 21.-Blood transfu-
sion in cases of gas asphyxiation has
been pronounced a success.
Dr. Karl A. Meyer made an experi-
ment on Gustave Mussel. The man
: thM poi 01 (dOith WihC ao
J;Ae'( a the~ county L tfl.
a u ea
Sloi., ii w A-' etiC1ar d,.

I. - A

WHAT'S GOING ON.P
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Cloudy and somewhat colder.
TODAY
Senior Lit dance, Barbour gym, 2:30
o'clock.
Chess club meets, 401 U-hall, 6:15
o'clock.
Cercle Francais presents "La Gram-
maire," Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
8:00 o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Upper Room Bible Class, 444 S. State
street, 7:00 o'clock.
-TOMORROW
"Joe" Robbins speaks, "Y" meeting,
Arcade theater, 6:30 o'clock.
Menorah society election, Newberry
hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Dr. Frank Gunsaulus lectures, Pres-
hvterian church 7-:0A'clnnk

Jacob S. Shields Lectured on the Fun-
damental Doctrines of
His Church
Jacob S. Shields, member of the
board of lectureship of the First
Church of Christ, Scientist, of Boston,
Mass., in a lecture on Christian Science
as the religion of divine law, in the
Whitney theatre Thursday afternoon,
said:
"The Mosaic law, 'Thou shalt have
no other gods before Me' is the origin
and basis of all true religion. Christ
Jesus taught the same law. Christian
Science accepts the law in all its
completeness, as expounded by both
Moses and Christ Jesus.
"Jesus came to present to the world
a godly wisdom by which sin, disease
anf death could be eliminated. That
there is a divine law, wisdom, and
power which was a secret from the
world, is evidenced by the marvellous
demonstrations of Jesus.
"He understood the law which leads
men to the realization of eternal life.
The same divine law is operative
and available today; is always pres-
ent, and universal because it is in-
finite"

P ESBYTERIAN ChURCH
J ON I R O AN PA RE VISIO 1S -
LFO ) A. RRF19 71A S M ,
. u - Thee:x oin b S k eOil.

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