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January 20, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THlE ("AMPUS

11I) ANT)

t
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Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW ORK SUN

1,,- 11 1 1 - , 00:1

VOL. XXVI. No. 80.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THUSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

i

FACULTY VMEMBERS
iVE OPINIONS ONI
U.S. DRUG PRBLEM
SITUATION CAUSED BY NON-.EX-
PORTATION OF SALVA RSAN
AND ASPERIN'
GERMAN DOOTORS TO BLAME
Law en Case Cited; Deans Vaughan
and Schlotterbeek, Profs. Wile and
Waite Interviewed
Several members of " the faculty
were approached yesterday on the sub-
ject of making salvarsan, asperin and
chemical dyes in this country, which
articles are decidedly scarce because
of the impossibility of obtaining them
from Germany. Pronounced agitation
has been begun on this matter and
Congress has even been urged to pass
a bill annulling the patents which
Germany has on these articles. A
number of American chemists are now
making these preparations and it is
said that several are doing so with-
out the consent of the patentees.
Dr. U. J. Wile, professor of derma-
tology and syphilology, wrote to Se-
ators Alden and Townsend and to
Secretary of State Lansing last Oc-
tober when the scarcity of these prep-
arations was first felt. In his letters
Dr. Wile urged tat the government
force Great Britain to allow shipments
of salvarsan to come into this coun-
try from Holland. At that time the
Germans had made some shipments
from the Netherlands, but were be-
ing held up by the British blockade.
"At present," Dr. Wile said, "we are
unable to get any salvarsan at all and
our supply is completely exhausted.
Salvarsan could be made as well in the
United States as in Germany and at
a smaller cost." According to various
members of the faculty, salvarsan can
be made in the university laboratories.
Dean Vaugian Gies Opinion
"Certainly Congress should annuli
thes patents." exclaimed Dean Vic-
tor C. Vaughan, of the medical school,!
when asked for his opinion. "They
should never have been granted in the
first place."
Continuing, Dean Vaughan said: "No
reputable American doctor would pat-
ent his medicines. When a German
xdoctor discovers a medicine, the first
thing he does is to get it patented.
Only quack doctors do that in this
country. When a doctor discovers a
medicine, he certainly should notiget.
it patented. He should nmake it a
gift to humanity. Salvarsan, asperin
and similar preparations can be made
in this country as well as in Germany,
and cheaper."
Patent Law on Subject
"Foreigners to whom patents have
been issued in this country stand on
(Continued on Page Six)

'Lack of Numbers
Prevents, Forum
leeting Not held Because of Slim At-
tea dance; Contemnplate
The announced meeting of the Union
Forum was not held last night be-
-luse atthe time set forstarting the
discussion only six men were present
in addition to Chairman Paul Thomp-
son, '16L. The committee in charge
of these meetings is contemplating
some decisive action with regard to
future Forum meetings unless more
interest is taken in them.
'Gargoyle Comes
Out Tomorrow
1 ldlt ary iNumber to Make Appearance
on Campus; Rumor That Editor
Is iinhiding
With the Military Training number
of the Gargoyle already in the hands of
the printers, rumor has been persis-
tent to the effect that the edition
would be suppressed at the last mo-
nient in the interests of peace.
These rumors reached a climax last
night in the report that the managing
editor is leaving town with the evi-
dent intention of remaining safely out
of reach until the edition is on the
streets tomorrow andthenfirst rwh
ofl excitement calms down. All ef-
forts to get in touch with this official
last evening proved fruitless and there
is some reason to believe that he has
already made his getaway.
U. S. Soldiers
fight Bandits
Troop Sknrmish with Mexin, Wh
Rill Cavalry Horse Near
Goyes, Wells
Hachita, N. M., Jan. 19.-A skirmish
between United States soldiers and
Mexican bandits in which one cavalry
lorse was killed was reported today
to the military authorities here by a
man named Lee, who arrived from
Goyle's Wells on a motor cycle. No
Americans were killed.
According to Lee's statement, Mexi-
can bandits crossed the line and rob-
bed a house near Goyle's Wells Tues-
day. The bandits were followed to-
ward the line by three soldiers. When
about twVo miles from Lone Cabin the
soldiers dismounted, tied their horses
to a fence and started to search for
'le bandits.
The bandits fired on the Americans.
killing one of the horses and caus-
ing the three others to stampede. Lee
made his way to Goyle's Wells on
foot, got a motorcycle there and rode
te Hachita to report the skirmish.

PROFESSORS ARE
NOT EMIPLOYEES
OF UNIVERSI TIES
B ELIIF ADVANCED BY COMMIT-
TEE ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM
OF A. A. U. P.
DEPORT SIGNED BY MANY

Airs. Paderelvski
' Gives Doll Show

To Sell Polish Toys for Benefit
War Sufferers in Memorial
flail Today

FACULTY COMMITTEE GIVES. JUNIORS
RIGHT TO PLACE 20ADIONLHOP
TICKETS ON SALE AT 12 O'CLOCK TODAY

of

Pro fes sors
bers of

Must Be Judged by Mem-
Their Own Profession,
Is Opinion

New York, Jan. 19.-The question of
academic freedom brought to a head
by the charges which resulted in the
dismissal of Prof. Scott Nearing by
the University of Pennsylvania is re-
viewed at some length in a report of
a committee of the American Asso-
ciation of University Professors, which
committee was appointed to formu-
late some basis by which academic
freedom might be safeguarded.
The most important conclusion;
reached by the committee is that while
the professors are appointed by the
trustees they are in no sense em-j
ployes, and that action on reappoint-J
nment or dismissal should be taken
only with advice of a board represen-
tative of the faculty.
The report is sigied by Prof. E. R. A.
Siligman, chairman, of Columbia Uni-
versity; Prof. Charles E. Bennett, of
Cornell; Prof. J. Q. Dealey, of Brown;
Prof. R. T. Ely, of Wisconsin; Prof.
H. W. Farnam, of Yale; Prof. F. A.
F etter, of Princeton; Prof. F. H. Gib-
bings, of Columbia; Prof. C. A. Kofold.1
of California; Prof. A. O. Lovejoy, of
Johns Hopkins; Prof. F. W. Padelford,
of Washington; Prof. Roscoe Pound,
of Harvard; Prof. H. S. Warren, of
Princeton; and Prof. U. G. Weather-t
ly, of Indiana.
The report points out that one of
the dangers threatening academic free-,'
door is that of restriction upon the ex-3
pression of opinion in privately en-
dowed universities which points to-
ward extensive social innovation orn
calls in question the moral legitimacy
or social expediency of economic con-
ditions or commercial practices in
which large vested interests are in-
volved.
As the governing body of a univer-
sity is naturally made up of men who
through their standing and ability are
interested in great private enterprises,
the points of possible conflict are num-
berless.
The report points out that, as most
benefactors of universities belong to
the more prosperous and conservative
classes, there is danger of pressure
being brought to bear upon academic
authority. In the state universities,
however, the report says, most of the
danger comes from political sources
because the institution is dependent
on legislative favor. The judging of,
professors by bodies not composed of
nmenbers of their profession is de-
nounced by the committee.
Rao. -Cause Loss in California
Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 19.-Heavy
rains moving eastward left most of
£outhern California recovering from
floc s wnic h claimed four lives, causing
damage estimated at $2,000,000. Ten
overland trains were blocked at Yuma,
Arizona.1

Mrs. Ignace Paderewski will pre-
sent a collection of Polish dolls and
otheratoys for saleinrthe Alumni Me-
morial hal this afternoon at 4:00
o'clock. An opportunity will thus
be given to all who wish to meet this
eminentworker for Polish relief. Mr.
Paderewski himself may be present.
Mrs. Paderewski came on from Chi-
cago at the request of Prof. Stanislaus
Zowski, of the mathematics depart-
ment, who knows both the pianist and
his wife personally. Some of the dolls:
will be sold for the benefit of the
Polish Relief Fund.
"In view of the fact that some people
seem to have a hazy idea of just what!
is done with this money for the Polish,"
said Professor Zowski, "I wish to state
that all the money is distributed in
Poland by the Poles themselves, and
conseqiently this has nothing to do
with any government. The financial
help reaches members of that nation-
ality who need it most."
ATTACK ON US COST
EASSYSEN WOOD
Trained Force of 150,000 Men Could
Cause Havoc Before Raising
of Army
Washington, Jan. 19.-Major-Gener-
al Leonard Wood told the Senate mili-
tary committee today that the coast-
line of the United States was open to
attack by any well-organized foreign
army, despite its equipment of forts,
mines and submarines, and that the
ocean formed no serious barrier to in
vasion.
He declared that in the country's
present state of utter unpreparedness
for war a trained force of 150,000 men
could inflict incalculable damage be-
fere an army could be assembled to
meet it.
As to the immediate need of the reg-
miar army, General Wood expressed
the opinion that the force of regulars
with the colors should be maintained
at 210,000. Of these he said 20,000
equipped and supplied for 'a year
time should be kept in the Philippines,
another 20,000 in Hawaii, and 15,400
at Panama.
Choose Pearl, '14,
AdelphiSpeaker
House of Representatives Names Its
Officers for Coming
Semester
Members of the Adephi House of
Representatives elected officers for the
next semester at their weekly sas-
sembly last evening. No bill was dis-
cussed, the entire meeting being de-
voted to the election and installation
of the officers.
William A. Pearl, '16, newly appoint-.
ed Rhodes scholar, was elected speak-
er, the other officers being I. S. Top-
lan, '17, clerk; Jesse Simpson, '18,
treasurer; H. D. Moses, '18, sergeant-
at-arms, and G. F. Hurley, '16, ora-
torical delegate.

12:00
on list.
2:30

to 2:30-Upperclassmen
to 5:00-Upperclassmen

* ~, * * * *

* #' * * *

* not on list. *
* 5:00 to 5:30-Underclassmen *
* on list.
* TOMORROW *
* 12:00 to 1:00 - Anyone (in *
case any tickets remain). *
* 4:00 to 5:00 - Chaperone *
* tickets only. *
4''
* * ** * * * : * * * * *
Participants to Be Elected to Delta
Sigma Rho, Oratorical
Fraternity
FACE MAROON TRIO TOMORROW
The Varsity debating team composed
of W. J. Goodwin, '16L, N. E. Pinney,
'16, and Paul V. Ramsdell, '16, will
leave via the Michigan Central for
Chicago at 1:17 o'clock this after-
noon. They will meet the Chicago
University team in Mandel hall tomor-,
row night in the annual Central
League debate. The question is the
same as that to be debated here, name-
ly: "Resolved that congress should
impose the literacy test on all Euro-
pean immigration." Chicago will.
contend on the affirmative, while
Michigan will uphold the negative
side of the question.
Goodwin comes from Louisville,
Kentucky, and was prepared for col-
lege in the Male high school of that
city. He is a member of Jeffersonians.
Pinney prepared for college in the
Big Rapids high school. He has al-
ready represented his alma mater ex-
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for. Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Fair and warmer; moderate winds.
TODAY
Reception for all Episcopal students
and faculty in Harris hall, 4:00 to
6:00 o'clock.
Paderewski recital, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
Senior engineer dinner, Union,
6: 0 o'clock.
Senior engineer assembly, 9:00
o'clock, room 348, eng.
Junior engineer assembly, 8:00
o'clock, room 348, eng.
Sophomore engineer assembly, 11:00
o'clock, room 348, eng.
Jac9b S. Shields speaks, Whitney
Theatre, 8:00 o'clock.
Dr. Iden talks, "Y" School for Stud-
ies in Religion, McMillan hall, 7:00
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Gargoyle out, noon.

SALE OF J-HOP TICKETS
TODAY

ACTION INCREASES ATTENDANCE
LIMIT TO FIVE HUN-
DRED COUPLES
ALLOW DANCING IN BOTH GYMS
Upperclassmen Signed on List May
Buy Tickets at Union From
12 to 2:30 o'clock
Permission has been granted to the
J-Hop committee by the faculty com-
mittee on student affairs for the use
of both gymnasiums for dancing on
the night of the Hop, and in conse-
quence the limit of tickets for the af-
fair is raised from 300 to 500.
Application was made yesterday
through the lists at the Union by
upperclassmen alone for the entire
new edition of tickets, and the sale
will be completed today. All upper-
classmen whose names have been sign-
ed to the application list will pur-
chase their tickets at the Union today
between the hours of 12:00 and 2:30
o'clock. In case there are tickets left
-at 2:30 o'clock, the sale will then be
open to any upperclassmen whose
names are not on the list. At 5:00
o'clock, a half-hour sale will be held
for the underclassmen who have their
names on the list, in case all cards
of admission have not been taken up
by upperclass purchasers.
It is practically certain that the en-
tire lot of tickets will be taken up to-
day. In the event, however, that any
remain at the conclusion of today's
sale, an open sale to the campus will
(Continued on Page Six)
APPER TO NIGCHTM
Selection of Program Material Proves
Important Factor in Success
Achieved by Genius
PEDALS PLAY IMPORTANT ROLE
Supreme skill in the selection of
programs has been an important fac-
tor in the success which Paderewski
has enjoyed during the 24 years he
has appeared before American audi-
ences. In accordance with his cus-
tom, the renditions chosen for his con-
cert in Hill auditorium this evening
will be of the sort intended to give
his audience an opportunity to hear
not only a great pianist, but also an
artistic interpreter.
Paderewski was the first pianist to
reveal the wealth of shading and color
to be found in the pedal work of the
piano. It was he who applied this
newly acquired art to such advan-
tage that the pianoforte seems to
"sing'' a melody with such smoothness
that the hearer almost forgets he is
listening to an instrument of per-
cussion.
While pianists from all portions of
the world have been following along
the lines laid down for them by this
genius, he is still the unapproachable
master,.made unique by the union of
his extraordinarily sensitive touch and
his skillful use of the pedals.

FREE LECTURE on CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
BY_
Jacob S. Shields, C. S. B.
of Chicago, Ill.
AT THE WHITNEY THEATRE-TONIGHT
EIGHT O'CLOCK -FREE TO THE PUBLIC

I

ituaents recital, :scnooi of music,

4:15 o'clock.
Meeting of Hillsdale College
dents, 1308 Geddes, 7:30 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meeting, 401 U-Hall,'
o'clock.
Michigan -Northwestern debate,
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Roundup Club dance, Granger's,
o'clock.

Stu-
7:00
Hill
9:00

*.
*
I .
*:
*
*:

The Union will need the serv-
ices of one hundred men in
mailing the new issue of the
Campus News Notes. All men
willing to help report to Homer
Heath, at the Union, Friday
morning at 10:00 o'clock.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*;
*;

Negative Varsity

4GOODW1N, IPINNE Y AND RAMSiiEL1,
Debaters W1o Meet uBn rity of Chicago in Windy Cityj
Tomorrow NightI

Leap Year party, Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.

*

t

HT IL ADITORIUM

i
i

crew

1!

Tickets, $1.00 Eao

,:

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