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January 19, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-19

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TilE DAILY -
$1.60
NEWS OF THE WOULD ANDI
THlE CAMPUS

The

Micllga.

pail. y

hone~s :--editorial 2<
Buasintess
NEW Y:ORK SUI

PRICE Fl'

VOL. XXVI. No. 79.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1916.

ARSITY DEBATE
SCHDLE OPENS
FRIDAY EVENING
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY AP.
PEARS HERE; OTHER MEET
IN CHICAGO
TO SPEAK IN HLLk A!DITOR1UM
Members of Teaan iaVe Held PraC-
tires I' emala's; sc.rIleed Part
of sac~"ofn tsWell
Michigan Varsity debaters will meet
Norwestern University in Hill audi-
torium, and Chicago University, in
Mandel Hall, Chicago, Friday, Jan.
21. The present indications, the con-
ing contests will be among the hardest
fought that Michigan has ever taken
part in. The Michigan teams, compris-
ing W. M. Brucker, '16L, J. R. Cotton,
'16, A. J. Stoddard, '17L, on the affirm-
ative, and W. J: Goodwin, '16L, N. Kl
Pinney, '16, and P. V. Ramsdell, '16,
on the negative, have been drilliing
nightly since the Christmas vacation,
in addition to giving a portion of their
vacation to the work.
The question to be debated this
year is: "Resolved, that Congress
should impose the literacy test on all
European immigrants." This is the
question that has repeatedly engaged
the attention of Congress. Three times
the substance of this measure has been
enacted, and three times vetoed by
the President, first by President Cleve-
land, second by President Taft, and
last by President Wilson, so that there
is no dearth of good authority on either
side.
Additional interest attaches to this
event because it is the first debate
held in Hill auditorium and also the
first one to be held under the new
status of the Oratorical association.
Every student is allowed free admis-
sion to the debate, only being required
to present the Oatorical association
ticket which he received at the first of
die year with his athletic book.
PADEE SI ALSO
A AT COMPOSR
Pianist Who Plays i HI1 Auditorium
Tomorrow Evening Has Written
Many Compositions
TO SELL AUTOGRAPHED PHOTOS
That Paderewski, who will be heard
in Hill auditorium tomorrow evening,
is a master pianist, every one knows;
but it is not so well known that he is
a composer of no mean ability,
He has to his credit a Concerto for
piano and orchestra, a Fantasia for
(Continued on Page Six)

LITERARY FACULY TO REVISE
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS?
Postpone Definie Action Until Next
Meeflng; Prof. Cross Appointed
to Senate
The literary faculty at its meeting
on Monday night considered revising
the graauation requirements, but def-
inite action was postponed until the
lext meeting of the body, which will
probably take place within two or
three weeks.
Prof. Arthur L. Cross was appointed
by the faculty to the vacancy in the
literary college representation on
the University Senate Council, caused
by the appointment of Prof. A. 11.
Lloyd, formerly one of its represen-
tatives, to the deanship of the grad-
uate school, which carries with it an
ex-officio membership in the council.
The faculty granted 7 A. B. and 8
B. S. degrees to students in the uni-
versity, besides making a number of
teachers' appointments.
COMPLETE UNION PARTY PLANS
Leap Year Affair to Be held Friday
from ;Vine till Two o'Clock
The final arrangements for the Leap
Year party to be held at the Union
Friday night from nine until two
o'clock have been completed and
everything is in readiness for the in-
novation. The tickets were put upon
sale yesterday afternoon and the rapid
sale gave evidence of a "full house."
The committee decided at a meeting
Sunday morning upon the music, but
hia not yet given out the name of the
orchestra.
The ney style Union programs will
oe used Friday night for the first time.
The new programs are a great im-
provement over the old ones and will
he used at all future Union Saturday
night dances. The committee in
charge of the Leap Year party is:
Richard McKean, '16, chairman; Verne
E. Burnett, '17; William F. Newton,
'17; John Breyman, '16E, and Harry E.
Johnson, '17L.
BOILER ACCIDENT KILLS THREE
Rolland-American Steamer Suffers In-
ternal Explosion
London, Jan 18.-The Holland-Amer-
ican steamship Ryndan arrived at
Gravesend, 20 miles down the river,
this afternoon, having suffered at sea
from internal accident in which three
of her stokers were killed and four
injured. Its nature was not disclosed
but it is supposed that it was a boiler
explosion of some sort. No passengers
were hurt.
The ship was down by the bow and
listed badly to starboard. She was
first sighted off Sound End, proceeding
slowly, and she came to Gravesend
under her own steam. The earlier
reports were that she had been tor-
pedoed but these later were laid
aside. The passengers who did not
land at Falmouth will remain on board
according to orders issued by the gov-
ernment.
HYDROGEN GAS FATAL TO E-2
S ubmturine I iaste Due to Explosio,
According to Report
Washington, Jan. 18, - Hydroge1
gas was responsible for the explosion

on the submarine E-2, at the New York
navy yard, resulting in the death of
four men and injuries to a number
of others. This is according to the
report of the preliminary board of
investigation convened by Rear-Admir-
al Usher, ,oniniandant of the yard.
The report was received at the navy
department today, and its conclusions'
were at once made public by Secre-
tary Daniels.

SEE COUP D'TT
IN LANING aF
IES IN GREECE
MONTENEGRO SURRENDERS ARMS
TO AUSTRIA-HUNGARY,
OFFICIALLY STATED
ENGLAND FIRM ON BLOCKADE
King Gustav V Warns Swedish Rlksdag
Against Usurpation of Rights
by Belligerents
Amsterdam, Jan. 18.-French and
British troops have been landed at
Corinth, Greece, 48 miles west of
Athens. according to advices received
here today. Allied troops that were
landed at Phaleron and at the Piraeus,
5 miles from Athens, yesterday, have
been withdrawn to their ships. A
coup d'etat of a kind that Europe has
not seen for half a century or morn~
is hinted at by Berlin officials and
openly expressed by the newspapers.
The removal of King Constantine
from his throne, the inauguration of
a republic and the election or selec-
tion of former Premier Venizelos as
president are suggested.
Montenegro Surrenders Arms
Vienna, via Berlin and Amsterdam.
(Continued on Page Six)
WORK PROGRSSES
ON ORATORICAL PLA
Mrs. Lucile Pryer, '16, and M. S. Mc-
Lean Take Roles of Vicar
and Wife
TICKETS GO ON SALE MONDAY
Work on the Oratorical association
play, "The Servant in the House,"
which will be given in University hall
on Thursday evening, January 27, has
been progressing rapidly, and from all
reports this year's production will ex-
ceed all others, both in stage work
and in elaborateness.
The cast is made up principally of
students who either have taken part
11 other stage productions or have been
taking extensive courses in the uni-
versity along that line.
Two of the more prominent cast
parts are taken by Mrs. Lucile Pryer
'16, and M. S. McLean, '16. Mrs. Pry-
er, who is a member of the Lyceum
club, took part in the oratorical asso-
ciatirrn play two years ago. Her hus-
band is director of the laboratory of
the board of health in Detroit. Mrs.
Pryer has taken considerable work in
dramatics in the university. She will
play the part of the vicar's wife.
:J. S. McLean, '16, has perhaps had
more practical experience than any
other member of the cast. He has
taken minor roles under Robert Man-
tell, Julia Marlowe and E. H. Sothern.
ilefore entering the university he stud-
ied the technique of the French drama
at Paris. He has also done some
dramatic coaching. McLean plays the
role of the vicar.
Costumes for the cast will be se-
cured from the New York Costume
company. Seats, at the popular prices
of 25, 35 and 50 cents, will go on sale
at Wahr's on Monday, January 24, All
seats for the occasion will be reserved.
The cast is practicing daily under
the direction of Prof.'R. D. T. Hol-

lister, who has successfully directed
the association, plays within the last
few years.#
Mrs. Pankhurst Secures Admittance
Washington, Jan. 18. -Secretary
Wilson, of the Department of Labor.
today issued orders admitting Mrs.
Emmeline Pankhurst, the English suf-
fragist, into the United States uncon-
ditionally.

Lngineers Will
Vote on Honor
Plan Thursday
Comes as a Result of flvo
Years' Agitation at
M'ichigan
MAKE CONSTITUTION
Students of the College of Engineer-
ing will be given an opportunity on
Thursday to vote on a new plan for
an honor system, which reached its
final form at a meeting of the honor
committee of the engineering college
last evening. The plan in the main
follows several that have been found
to be practical in other universities.
If adopted the scheme will be the re-
sult of two years of agitation for the
use of the honor system in examina-
tions among the engineers.
The vote will be held in the class
assemblies, and from interest already
shown in the agitation it is expected
that everybody will turn out. In or-
der that class members may vote intel-
igently the committee hereby submits
the following "Constitution of the Hon-
or System:"
Article I; Definition of System.
Sec. 1. This system shall be known
as the honor system of the student
body of the College of Engineering of
the University of Michigan.
Sec. 2. Definition of Violations.
Any of the following acts shall be
considered violations of the honor
system: any attempt to receive dis-
honest assistance either before the
examination or quiz begins or during
its continuance, from books, papers,
or any printed matter or written aids
whatsoever, or from any person who
has or has not completed his paper.
Sec. 3. The Pledge.
Every student shall append to his
quiz or examination paper a written
or printed declaration reading as fol-
lows: "I pledge my word of honor
that in this exercise I have not re-
ceived dishonest assistance of any
kind." (Signature.)
Any student who fails to place the
pledge on his paper shall be notified.
If he then refuses to make the pledge,
he shall be reported by the examiner
to the honor committee for investi-
gation. If he still refuses to sign, his
refusal shall be taken as direct evi-
dence of dishonesty, and he will be
punished as hereinafter described.
Article II. Duties of Faculty.
Section 1. The Examiner.
The instructor in charge of the quiz
or examination remains in the room
or leaves at his own option. Should
he remain he cannot act as a proctor.
Sec. 2. Powers of the Faculty.
A students finished examination pa-
per which gives evidence of dishonest
work shall be turned over by the fac-
(Continued on Page Six)
'PES, WILSON PREPARES
TO ASSERLEUDRSHIP
President Will Stump Western State
to Arouse Public Interest
in Party Questions
Washington, Jan., 18.-President Wil-
son is preparing to assert his leader-
ship of the . Democratic party in a
vigorous campaign. In the near fu-
ture he will begin a series of speeches
in the west and middle west in advo-

cacy of the national defense pro-
grain and the other policies of the a(,-
ministration.
The President, while wishing pri-
marily to stir up public opinion in a
way that will force the national de-
fense program through Congress, will
in reality act in a political character.
The tour will represent the President's
acceptance of William Jennings Bry-
an's challenge to protect his leader-
ship of the Democratic party.

TWODY 5,A''9LE To JUNIOR CLASSES
DISPoSL F[AL J*- HOP TICKET!L
TO ASK IE FBOH YNAI
t 8: a ,. '. [ *ta a ' lr -tn rrrttsC An

*

Tiae - 0ocok
Place - 'e Uo
Subect--- The ho;;
Chairman--Paul +'
'IGL.

.night.
systoeps
Thompson,

*
*

'OI Mi. MTITE 'ETI'IIONS JFOR UR
SPACE TO ACCOMIODATE
THOSE DISAPPOINTED
APPLICATION LIST AT UNIO
Lists to Be Open Today for Thos
9esirous o Securing Tickets
for the Event
Surpassing all previous record
this year's J-Hop yesterday set a ne
mark in the popularity of the annu
function at Michigan when the tot,
number of 300 tickets was exhauste
The demand for reservations for th
year's party is all the more remal
able from the fact that yesterday wv
only the second day of the sale, an
* -* * *

TO DISCUSS HONOR
Paul F. Thompson, '16L, Chaim ni of
fMeeting at Union
Tonight
Paul F. Thompson, '16L, will ict as
chairman for the Unon Forum meet-
ing tonight, and will introduce the
discussion of the honor system. This
topic has been brought up belcre in
Forum meetings, but at no time before
has there been such widespread in-
terest in its adoption or its abandoi-
men,
Tonight's meeting will be the first
of its kind since the holidays and will
also be the last one this semester, In-
asmuch as the honor system is to be
used :n many examinations in the com-
ing ir'als, men of all departments
have interested themselves in this sys-
tem and are ready to discuss it. Not
all of the campus opinion favors the
honor ,ystem by any means, and.
those who are seeking to keep it out
of the engineering college, as well as
those that wish to have it put aside
in il -. low school, are hot in opposi-
tion to its adoption as a school mea-
sure.
STORM IN CAIFOANIA ABATES
People Left Homeless in Los Angeles
by Damaging Fiood and Wind

{

Chairman Edward Mack has *
Sannounced the name of the "
young lady who is to assist bi *
: in Lading this year's J.-hop. *
She is Miss Beatrice Floyd, of *
* Dietroit, formerly a resident of *
* Philadelphia. Miss Floyd will *
mourney to.Ann Arbor from Tar- *
ryfown - on - the - Hudson, New
York, where she is in atten- *
dance at Knox School.
* *
* * * *.j* * * * * * * * *
that the npurchase of admission cards
has to date been restricted to juniors
only.
With the announcement last night
that the entire allotment of paste-
boards had been taken up, requests
for reservations were received from
members of all classes on the campus.
Seniors and underclassmen, to whom
the sale had not yet been opened,
joined with those juniors who were
delaying until the third day before
making purchase of their tickets, in
expressing the sentiment of the
campus for a larger Hop. This de-
velopment is evidence that the J-Hop
has outgrown any narrow limitations
of which it may have been accused
in the past, and has come into its
own as the big democratic, all-uni-
versity function of the year.

Los Angeles, Cal., Jan.
six persons were killed a
of $3,000,000 worth of pro
aged by flood and wind,
ceased today. Many fain
homeless in Los Angeles
rounding villages. Heroicc
being made to reach mar
senger trains tonight.
SWHAT'S GOIN

18.-After
nd upward

perty dam- At a special meeting of the J-Hop
the storm committee lield at the Union last
ilies were night, plans were put in motion to
and sur- recognize this demand for a larger
efforts were Pop, and to take care of the present
ooned pas- call for ti kets. With that end in
view, a petition was addressed to the
Committee on Student Affairs, asking
that permission be granted for -the
r(" ]N use of both gymn'asiums for dancing
on the night of the Hop, thus making
an Vida-(Continuedon Page Six)
cold; mod.

Wether for Ann Arbo-,

ity- -Weduesday--Fair and
ilr--i 3"x .-.

1'

TODAY
Freshman Engineers Assembly,
room 348, 11:00 o'clock.
All-Fresh fles club rhearsaL, Me-
Milian hall, 7:15 o'clcck.
Frcshman viandoiin cluo practice,
205 N. '., 7:30. o'cnadh.
Forum, Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Band rehearsal, Uiversity hall, 7:C
'elcck.
Delta S _ n Rho -ev(ing, cra'cjry
room N. W., 4:00 o'clock.
TOMOP RO)W
Reception for all Episcopal students
and faculty in -Hat1is ha. 4:00 to
6:00 o'clock.
Paderews':i recital, -ill }dito'ij.
8:00 o'clock.
Senior en2gineer dinner, UrnP-n,
6:30 o'clock,
Senicr en iner v.,bli, 9:
o'clock, room 348, eng.
Junior engirer assernbly, 8:00
o'clock. room 348, en-
Sophomore engineer assembly, 11:00
o'clock, room 348, eng.

3

fUNAE PADEREWSKI,
Who Will Be Heard in Hill Audi.
toriuin Tomorrow Night,

MRS. LU(ILE PRYER, '163
Who Will Play the Part of the Vicar's
Wife in "The Servant dn the
House," January 27.

ih \ S A

H ILL

f ,

. = ..

TOMORROW

VIOiING

IR mEImuuwu0m0ticketseFor Sale at SCHOOL f M

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