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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

six

THE .Mb f3 GAk: 1 AIL r

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11

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Y h

We Can Make a
Dress Suit

Why Not Have LYNDON?
His pictures are always the best and xlO's are only 25c
QUALITY MAKES QUANTITY
QUANTITY MAKES PRICES
That's why I can do it for a quarter
I lead, while others follow
Get the best of everything photographic of
LYN D ON, 719 No. University Avenue

11

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V

TODAY AT =GJESTIC- HT
3:00 p.m. -TW* 4E* A~#-73-pm
DR. ROYAL RACEFORD - - TE MN EWHO
TAMED ELECTRICITY
LAI MON KIM-- - - - NOTED
CHINESE TENOR..
KREMKA BROS. ED. & JACK SMITH
PREMIER ACROBATS ENTERTAINERS

which will look as if molded on you. It will
be the perfection of fit and fashion, embody-
ing elegance and good taste.
Whether you respond to a toast, or lead
in a German, other=men will admire your
suit and some may ask,"Who is your Tailor?"
But allow us time enough to put into your
suit those refinements which are the Hall-
marks of our work.
DRESS SUITS SHIRTS TO
FOR HIRE ORDER
604 E. Liberty Malcolm Block

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AND THEN
THE GIRLS

"ON THE 5:15"

III

r

~

I..
Swair
713. E. Univ. Ave.

Makes Photographs with Correct Color Values of
Paintings, of Drawings in Monochrome or Poly-
chrome, and of Colored Objects. I [as .Photo-
graphed more Original Manuscripts on Parch-
ment than any one else in the State. Home
Portraiture a Specialty.

-A"

Van's Quality Shoe Shop
For
O'SULLIVAN Rubber Heels
and Classy Work

1114 3 University Ave,

- THE NEW SHOP

E are equipped to do Gold
Leaf Stamping, Embossing,
Engraving, Fine Printing
and Beautiful and Durable
Printing.

All of these are necessary to produce the various kinds of
dance and banquet programs, in which we',lead

HOLD MEMORIAL
SERVICEFOR HALL
MHchigan-Dartmouth Graduate Hon-
ored After Death by French
Badge of Honor
lOC:AL BOY BURIED IN VOSGES
Tribute was paid to the memory of
the late Richard Neville Hall, ex-'1,
who was killed while engaged in am-
bulance work i the Vosges region re-
cently, at the S Andrew's Epis-
copal church last Sunday.
Rev. Henry Tatlock,the rector, de-
livered the address. On one side of
the chancel were hung the national
colors of France, and on the other
was hung a portion of the shell-torn
canvas of Hall's ambulance, the red
cross still intact.
Rev. Tatlock first reviewed the work
of the American ambulance corps in
France, and read the following ex-
cerpt from a resolution accorded to
Hall by his fellow workers.
"The funeral service was held in a
little Protestant chapel, five miles
down the valley, usually attended by
many officers and soldiers and natives
of the valley, but today reserved for
Hall and his comrades, as the soldiers
were engaged upon the mountain crest,
where a fierce fight for the Hart-
mannsweilerkopf still was raging.
"At the conclusion of the service,
Hall's citation was read and the cross
of war pinned upon the French flag
which covered his bier. The body was
then carried to the cemetery by the
commander of his section, a French
officer and an English officer, and
three of his comrades. His brother,
Louis Hall, walked directly behind the
bier, and 16 soldiers, belonging to the
battalion on leave from the trenches,
marched on the sides with arms re-
versed.
SKA'TE CARNIVAL
BEGINS TONIGHT
(Continued from Page One);
by . A. Knowlson, '18E, and Staley
Robertson, '17M.
Tickets for the event are going
rapidly, 500 being sold by yesterday
noon. At the Athletic Supply Store
of George Moe on North University
and at the University Library, the sale
of tickets for students is being held.
Since it is only by buying their tick-
ets here before going to the rink to-
night, that the student money will be
available for the new athletic club
house for the women, the student
Imanagers of the affair urgently re-
quest that tickets be procured some
time this afternoon.
The lineups for the teams as they
will appear on the rink tonight will
be as follows:
Men's Teams
Stovel, '16E.. . . Rover.... .Weston, '18E
Rehor, '17P. ... Goal ........Rye, 18E
Brodie, '16E.... .Point . . .Hughes, '18E
Shannon, '17D. . Cover ......Sharp, '17
Peters. '17D
Christiansen, '16E Center.....Katz, '17
Cameron, '17L..Left..Knowlson, '18E
Pear, '17D
Gibson, 18D.....Right .. Barton, '18E
, Women's Teams
rovah, '16.....Rover R. MacLachlan, '18
Stanley, '16...Cover .........Saer
Fletcher, '16 .Center. Riggs, '19
Garvin, '16......Right Mead', '16
Biel, '19........Pointr.....Lloyd, '19
Davis, '17...... Goal Schumacher, '16

Maines GARRICKe
an saJ GAWednesaan.17th
DETROIT
"A PAIR OF SIXES"
The Funniest FARCE
In the World
ARCADE
Shows at 3.oo, 6 30, 8:00, 9:30
Tuesday, January 18 - Lillian Lorraine
in "Should a Wife Forgive?" Equit-
able Feature.
Wednesday, Jan. 19. - "Over Night,"
'wip vivian Martin a n d Samuel
Hardy. Five-part World feature.
Wednesday, January 2o-"Sunday," five-
part World feature with Reine Davies
and Montagu Love in the leading roles
Is A

Parisian Ivory Leather Coods Silverware
Gold Pocket Knives Chains Pencils

Rings
Michigan pins
Fobs

Factory Hat Store
118 E. Huron St.

THE MAYER-SCHAIRER CO.
AN N ARBOR. MICHIGAN

Spoons
Pendants Novelties
Lockets

FINE WATCH AND
JEWELRY REPAIRING

"T he

HALLER JEWELRY CO.
State Street Jewelers

TAVER N"

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SALINE, MICHIGAN

A'Fine $2.00 a Day House located on.
Electric Line and nine wiles from Ann Arbor.
We serve special dinners to small Banquets,
Clubs and Parties. Phone 63
Regular 50c-Meals-Special $1.00
CARL SCHLEH, Prop.

"WHY HAVE {Y rWARl?" QUERIES
DEBS OF LARGE AI)IENCE
(Continued front Page One)
has at last overstepped itself and a
new movement is rapidly coming to
a head. Both capitalist and laborer,
he said, are victims to our present
order. Over-production is based on
under-consumption, and until we de-
vise some method of doing away with
the greed of competitive-trained capi-
tal, all our efforts at amelioration
through a process of law-making are
futile.
Socialists Favor Woman Suffrage
Mr. Debs touched upon woman suf-
frage, assuring his audience that the
Socialist party stood for the com-
plete emancipation of woman and her
enthronement at the side of man.
where she in truth belongs. "Th4
Socialist party," he said, "was the
first party in the world to recog-
ize woman as a human being." With-
out the inspiriting influence of woman,
man is never at his best, and it is a
matter of history that the best work
ever produced has been performed
with the soul of a woman as its guid-
ing star. This portion of the speech
found the speaker in his best humor,
and his witty presentation of the en-
tire suffrage problem brought him
round after round of applause from
an appreciative audience.
Business Topics
BRADSTREET'S SAYS BUSINESS
OF NATION UNUSUALLY GOOD.
Bank 'learances Rise; Steel Output
Soars; a General Rise in
Prices Follows
According to Bradstreet's weekly re-
view of the trade situation, good busi-
ness, activity in industry, high proces.-
and cold weather feature the week's
commercial activity. The cold wave
which has swept the country has tem-
porarily hampered trade, but has to a
great extent made up for this by creat-
ing a demand for seasonable goods.
Good business is everywhere evi-
dent. Trade in dry goods, especial-.
ly orders for future delivery, has been
large and shipments in general merch-
andise have been larger than at any
time in recent years.
Industry in general is employed to
full capacity. Steel mills' outputs are
sold for several months in advance;
prices and wages are at a high-point.
Demand for lumber products is, stead-
ily increasing and the cold weather

1JOII& ROTHERS
Like the car itself these win-
ter bodies are strong but light;
and the motor therefore retains
all its liveliness and flexibility
The demountable tops are uphol-
stered in cloth. The lighting is by
electricity. The lines are graceful
and the finish is in keeping with
that of the car.
The motor is 30-35 horsepower
The price of the Winter Touring Car or Roadster,
complete, including regular mohair top, is
$95o (f, o. b. Detroit)

I

Staebler & Sons

119 W. Washington

Phones 8 and 85

BOOKS WORTH READN
(Continued from Page Four)
policy of dealing with the problem, the
author proves conclusively the need
of either prohibition or of the policy
of regulation. Consequently, the
author must consider the merits of
the other two policies. This he does
in the remaining chapters of the book.
Dr. Durand recognizes very. frank-
ly that the policy of the federal gov-
ernment in the past has not restored
competition. In speaking of this pol-
icy the author says (37): "This meth-
od of dissolving trusts,-by leaving
the ownership of all the e snstituent
parts to the same persons that owned
former controlling corporation,-can
hardlybecharacterized by any other
word than farcial." But in spite of
this fact, the writer contends that this
policy has at least' prevented the for-
mation of trusts since the Sherman
Anti-Trust Act has been used. Why
then would the author advocate, the
policy of prevention? First of all he
contends that the methods used by
the courts in the past are not the ones
that ought. to have been .used. The
method that Dr. Durand is inclined to
favor is the policy pursued in the
Union Pacific case. In this case, the
court held that the stock of Southern
Pacific Company which was held by
the Union Pacifio,, should be disposed
of only with the approval of the court.
And in addition, the writer would
advocate a vigorous enforcement of
+1- nt;+r~c ln c P neei al i -

posing - prison sentences upon the of-
fenders.
The policy of regulation is rejected
by the author because of the vast prac-
tical difficulties in regulating the
trusts. According to the author the
machinery needed to regulate the
trusts would be very complicated and
detailed.
In the appendix to the book we find
printed all the federal laws dealing
with combinations in restraint of
trade. This is a very good feature of
the book.
It is the opinion of the reviewer
that this is the. best book ever written
that deals with the legal aspects off
thi brnhlpm It is bh d to f kLU A d

has had its effect in creating an ex-
cessive demand for coal.
On January 1, 1916, price levels were!
the highest ever known; 51 commodi-
ties rising, while only 19 decreased.
The total expenditure for building
in 156 cities in the United States for
the month of December was $67,892-
361, an increase of 62.4% over the cor-
responding period in 1914, at which]
time, however, building was much de-
pressed. For the last quarter of 19151
the increase over the last quarter of
1914 was 50 per cent.
Bank clearings for the week ending
Thursday, January 13, aggregated
$4,776,164,000, a gain of 54.4 per cent'
over the same week last year and
a gain of 37.8 per cent over the cor-
responding week in 1914. The in-
crease at New York over last year
was 77.4 per cent, while 106 cities re-
ported gains and only nine reported

Window Cards
A SPECIALTY
ALSO
Programs and Stationery

ves prooem.n las oun eo Le a te Van Zandt, '19
very important place in the literature Coburn, '19. Left ... Shinkman, '17
of the trust problem. Gaz, '19
R. D. Kilborn. _au_,
Claim Russian Defeat
Constantinople, Jan. 17.-(By wire-
WOULD DEPOSE GREEK KING? less to Berlin and London, Jan. 17).-
___ . An official statement given out tonight
Berlin Papers Interpret Landing of declares that the Turks have repulsed
: English at Pealeron as Move Russian offensive on the Caucasus
Hostile to Ruler front. The statement says:
"The enemy on the Caucasus front
Berlin (bywireless to Sayville, L. I.) repeated his fierce attacks in the sec-
Jan. 17.-Berlin newspapers, accord- tor to the south of the A asa river
ing to the Overseas News Agency, ex- as far as the Karadach mountains."

DAVIS & OHLINCER
PROMPT PRINTERS
I 109-111 E. Washington Phone 432-J
more active, and activities are meet-
ing with success, despite the high pric-
es. Cold weather in the northwest
is creating a demand for winter neces-
sities, but the cold weather is hamper-
ing shipments. Bank clearings for
the week ending last Thursday show
a gain of 40 per cent over the corres-
ponding time last year.

losses.t
Business in Canada is becoming

'The Ann Arbor Press.--Phone No.

press the belief that the landing of al-}
-lied troops at Pealeron, five miles
southwest of Athens, is considered'
evidence that the entente powers in-
tend to use extreme means to force!
the hand of the Greek government in
order to substitute a republic which
Venizelos will' head.j

WATCH This Space
DzrIn.g the .Con-
Ing Week

Peace Party Stranded in The Hague
The Hague, Jan. 17.-The Ford
peace party is stranded here unable
to get to. Stockholm, which it has
chosen for its prominent meeting
place. The Berlin foreign office has
given a fiat refusal to the peace party

BLUE BOOKS
"Con Proof Kind"
Will Occupy Your Attention at That Time

I

The S Ald ets'.Supply Store
Opp. IEng. Arch 1111 8. UNIVERSITY

appeal to be allowed to cross German
E Cod Printing. The Ann Arhaor Press. territory again in a sealed train.

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