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January 16, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-16

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AUTOMOBILE

I

THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THEWORLD AND
THE CAIPUS

Th

l~I

EDITION

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEURArH SERICE BI THE
tEW YORK SUN

v

~-

VOL. XXVI, No. 77.
TRYOUT FOR BAND
BOUNCE TO DRAW
UNUSUAL ABILITY

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN 1

ANNOUNCE WRITERS 'iscuss VOiA
Of UNION'S OPERA CHANGES A qSING

inil

'.. 1~ '. John, 'l16, and 11. It. Seltatiz.~

k

hi, ')iWrite Bok o or 1916

ASPIRANT, TO MEET IN
OFFICES TOMORROW
AFTERNOON

N SME E LI4W a. E

'BAND

mggRECTR ) Mo1ium AUS BOO
S . AP. .John, '1a, and H. R.
Schiadzki, "51", who is now in Peoria,
M-l. arc the two writers of the 1916j:

RUMMEL 16l, AGAIN AT HEAD
B1nd to Strike Up New Selections
1etAeu Singing, Daneing and
Novelty Acts
When the aspirants for places upon
the program of the next Band Bounce
meet Monday afternoon at the prelim-
inary tryout in the band offices on the
second floor of the engineering shops
between 4:00 and 5:00 o'clock, the
main step toward a big scale novelty
production will have been taken.
Henry C. Rummell, '14-'16L, to whom
the success of the last three Band
Bounces is due, will again have charge
of the production. Working with him
is a committee composed entirely of
experienced men.
Already many men who have not
previously appeared before the stu-
dent public have applied to the com-
mittee in charge for suggestions as to
just what will be most acceptable for
this production, and for help in pre-
paring their scenes, but the commit-
tee has insisted in every case that
they wait until Monday, in order that
all competitors for this honor may be
given an equal chance of favorably'
impressing their judges.
Numerous skits are being practised
with a view to producing them upon
this occasion. A one-act play of in-
tense dramatic interest is included
upon the list of known offerings, while
a ventriloquist, who has made a hit
upon the vaudeville stage, and many
feature dancers of extreme merit plan
to aapear.
Singing, dancing, tumbling and ac-
robatic acts, whistlers, -monologists
end cartoonists, novel musical stunts,
skits of all kinds, and other features
are among the specialties desired for
the event.
Between the acts chosen, the band
will fill Hll auditorium with entirely
new music,, which it has been pre-
paring for this occasion at weekly
practices since the last entertainment.
In view of the name which the Band
Bounces have won for themselves in
the past, the committee realizes that
it has a difficult proposition upon its
hands to produce a show which will
be an improvement upon them, but it
firmly believes that this is possible'
since it feels that there is much mate-
rial of the first magnitude upon the
campus which has not yet appeared in
public, and which it expects will be
brought forward at the time of this
preliminary tryout.
WOMEN TO PY HOCKEY
MATCH ATSKATING FIST,
Devote Carnival Proceeds to Start
Fund For Women's Athletic
Clubhouse
Plans for the Skating Carnival to
be held at Weinberg's rink next Tues-
day night are rounding into shape, and
in addition to the men's hockey games
already announced, there will be an-
other hockey match played by selected
teams of University women. The per-
sonnel of the two women's teams has
not yet been deter:ained, though Phyl-
lis Povah, '16, and Madge Mead, '16,
who will probably captain the oppos-

ITJT\~l0T-T1+(-)T ,-"rn iF TWill. T5

A I

Snion opera. i ' "'"t12 )
The kook as worked out by them LARGEh NUMb1ER
la accepted by the committee last ~-
fall on condition that it be revised. "What are you good fr?" was the
The two writers worked on it during question raised and ansvmc cd in vari-
he snuimer, but corrections did not ous ways at the closin5 session of the
meet the approval of the committee, Vocational Coufernc, held Saturday
so it was entirely rewritten. As it now morning and noon in arbour gymna-
tands, the book is claimed to be the shum. The morning session was con-
bc t 11a1 azy unon opera has ever ducted by Helen Humphries, '16, pres-
d. writers have spent more !ident of the Woman's League, who in-
t Thery ttroduced Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen, '84-
tuine on the 1916 opera than any other I,8!
Sriter", but their final product shows '8. Dr. Van Hoosen spoke on the
wupert t . a eOt r I possibilities in the medical profes-
us ks. oealthsion for women, especially in the fields
boks gata -of relief and examination work, dis-
tDirector Morgan spoke of it as be-
ing an "excellent book," and one thatpensary positions, welfare work, and;
lug n "ecelent ook, an onetha college infirmaries.
bore all the stamps of a good show. In the absence of Mrs. Francis
1'e spoke pleasingly of the plot the Burns; Prof. James Glover of the
writers bad worked up, and with the Mathematics Department outlined the
good materials for cast parts on hand situations open to women in actuarial
he feels sure that the opera will be work Life insurance opens a wide
a great success. Lies
The lyrics for the opera will also (Con inied on Page Eight)

FOUR DEA; TEN
HURT IN SUB-SEA
CRAFT EXPLOSION
AUThORITIES AT LOSS TO FIN!)
CAUSE FOR BLOWINW UP
OF E-22
SUSPECT EDISON BATTERIES
llnliIed )lan Among Killed; Piece o
Mal'M Overalls Carried About
20)0 Feet by shock
New York, Jan. 15.--An explosion
which naval officers so far are unable
to explain wrecked the interior of the
United States submarine E-2 while she
was being repaired in drydock No.
2 in the Brooklyn navy yard this aft-
ernoon, instantly killing one enlisted
man and three yard workmen and in-
juring at least 10 others at work in
the submarine so severely that some
of them are expected to die.
'VhO E-2 was equipped with Fdi-
son batteries, for which the chief
merit claimed is that they do not
give off chlorine gas. Also the E-2
had no gasoline aboard, as her mo-
tive power is generated by a Diesel
oil-burning engine. There was no ex-
plosive powder aboard.
"There was not, at least there should
not have been anything aboard the
E-2," was the way Rear-Admiral Na-
thaniel R. Usher, commandant of the
navy yard, put it, in reply to ques-
tions, -"which could explode."
Of the four dead, one, R. B. Sea-
zert, an electrician of the third class,
was the only enlisted man; the others
were navy yard workmen. The dead
are: Joseph Logan, a plumber -em-
ployed in the yard; J. H. Peck, an
assihtant plumber, working with Lo-
gan; John Schultz, a yard laborer;
R: B. Seazert, enlisted man and third

Dr. W]lliam Rosenau, Who Speaks at Union Services in H!
Tonight

Auditorium1

UNION SERVICES TO
HEAR DR,_ROSENAU~
"The Place of Authority in Life" Will
be the Subject of Address
Tonight
THE GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED
Dr. William Rosenau, president of
the Central Conference of American
Rabbis and one of the foremost men
in the Jcwi: pulpit today, will speak
on "The Place of Authority in Life"
at the Third Union service of the year
to be held in Hill auditorium at 7:00
o'clock tonight under the auspices of
the Jewish Student Congregation.
Rabbi Rosenau is minister to the
]Lutaw Place congregation of Balti-
more, Md., one "of the largest congre-
gations in the east. He is a professor
of Semitics at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity, acting in the capacity of as-
sociate to Professor Haupt. Dr. Rose-
nau is also the author of several
known books upon Jewish subjects.
The ritual service at tonight's meet-
ing will be conducted by Rabbi Leo lt
Franklin, of Detroit, who will also
bring with him for the occasion the
choir of Temple Beth El, Detroit, un-
der the direction of William Howland.
All churches in the city will be
closed %during the services, and the
Y. M. C. A. has given up the usual
Sunday mneeting scheduled for the Ar-
cade theatre.
The general public is invited to at-
tend the services.
(4reeks Killed by German Projectiles
Paris,. Jan. 15.-The official French
conimunication issued tonight says:
"On the date of January 14, enemy
aeroplanes dropped projectiles on
Janas. Some Greek soldiers were
wounded and one was killed."
probably some exhibitions of fancy
skating will be offered by the varied
talent of the university.
The object of the carnival, that of
starting a fund to be used for the
erection of a Women's Athletic club-
house, will only be realized if the
students buy their tickets before go-
ing to the rink Tuesday evening, for
all money taken in at the gate will go

Y9LNSPROMISE ON TRACK
Zoellin Wins Both 35-Yard Dash and
High hurdles, Tying the Gym
Record Over Sticks
SHOW POOR FORAY IN ShOT-PUT
With at least 100 men out for the
first indoor track meet of the season,
Michigan's freshmen yesterday put on
the boards a brand of track which
causes the authorities to be more
hopeful regarding this season's All-
Fresh cinder outfit. Because of the
number of candidates who presented
themselves to the coach as tryouts,
there will be meetings of this sort
held every Saturday afternoon for the
present at least, in order that the new
men may be as strong as possible this
coining season.
Most of the events showed promis-
ing material. Without exception the
track events were run off in good time,
particularly the 35-yard dash, the high
hurdles and the fastest lap of the six-
lap race. With but one lap more to
complete the half mile, Tuttle com-
pleted the course in 1:50 3-5, which
is exceptionally good for so early in
the season. The ten-lap race also
brought out some good time as well
as good material, the time for this
event being 3:25 flat for the best heat,
another heat being finished in 3:28.
Zoellin, the star of last year's inter-
scholastics, was the individual star of
the meet, as expected, winning the
opening event, the 35-yard dash, in
4 2-5 seconds, which is very fast time,
and leading .the field to the tape in
the high hurdles in six seconds flat.
In the dash Zoellin was but a hair
ahead of Altenberg, the baseball star,
who is out for the outfield of the Pitts-
burgh Pirates.
Both the shot-put and the polt-vault
showed the necessity of a great deal
of development if the freshment are
to be strong in these branches. Bush
took the first honors with the 16-
pound missile with only 32 feet nine
inches, while last year's team had
three men who could better this mark
by several feet without extending
themselves. In the pole-vault, Wong,
the Chinaman, and Casteel early put
the other entries out of the running,
and then fought it out for supremacy
all alone. Wong succeeded in making
the ten-foot leap on his first try and
was given first place when Casteel
(Continued on Page Eight)

be written by W. A. P. John, '16, and
are to be completed in a short while.
These will be sent to the publisher as
soon as possible, in order that the
music may be published.
THREE BAD CHECKS PASSED
Papers Totalling $35 Were Passed
Upon Business Concerns
Three checks totalling $35 were
passed yesterday on different busi-
ness concerns, signed by a stranger
who fraudulently used the name of
Max Goldman.
All of the checks were payable on
the Ann Arbor Savings bank, dated
December 14, by "Goldman Bros.,"
,with the initials "M. J. G." appearing
underneath the signature. Two of
them for $10 each were made payable
to Louis PoN ell, as was the other,
with the amount of $15. They were
cashed by John McGregor, Willis E.
Scott and the State Savings bank.
The forgery was discovered by Mr.
Goldman, who stated that W. L. Pow-
ell, whose signature appears on the
check, was a former employe of his,
and that he had resigned his position
on December 4 and since that time
he has had no trace of him.
The police department took charge
of the case, but late yesterday they
had failed to obtain any trace of thej
forger.

PROMINENT SCAI~
SPEAK HERE TOMORROWI
Edwin Markham Lands Him as One
of the Greatest Men of
the Century
Eugene Victor Debs, who speaks in
Newberry hall at 8:00 o'ciock tomor-
row night, comes to Ann Arbor her-
alded as one of the most eloquent and
persuasive orators in America. His
powers as a speaker and his sincerity
as a friend of man are recognized by
practically all wh6 have heard him,
(Continued on Page Eight)

class electrician.
he olyctrheory as to the causee
the explosion advanced was that
though the batteries are said to g
off no appreciable quantity of chl
ine gas, it is possible that a suffici
amount of hydrogen had been libera
which, when a ventilating duct ru
ning from the batteries was open
mixed with the surrounding air a
exploded. If an accumulation of I
drogen caused the explosion, as
thought most probable by the na
yard experts, it was gas which had
cumulated between the top of the si
battery jars and the electrolytes.
The vessel and the other submar
of the type which are equipped w
these new batteries, the invention
Thomas A. Edison, have 230 of th
batteries, each in a steel jar and e
battery weighing about 600 poun
The hydrogen gas accumulated in
was above a quantity of water,'usua
about 20 gallons, which is kept th
The men at work upon these bat
ies today were engaged in drawing
(Continued on Page Eighit)
I -HOP TICKET SALE TOMORR

INDOOR MEN ADO THREE
'MORE FORFEITS TO LISTi

Eugene W. Deus,

,ocialist Leader

I-

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

J-Laws, Sophi and Fresh
Fail to Show Up at
uled Games

Lits Teams
Sched-

Weather Forecast -Local snow t
night and Sunday; generally fair.
TODAY.

o- Sale to be Limited to Juniors
First Three Days

Three more indoor games were add-
ed to the long list of forfeits last night.
The teams which failed to put in an
appearance were the soph lits, who
forfeited to the J-lits; the fresh lits,
who forfeited to the architects; and
the J-laws, scheduled to play the
J-engineers.
Those men who refused to be quit-
ters lined up for a scrub game, Harry-
man and Doran being the victorious
battery, Doran looking like a coming
catcher; and Harryman, who pitches
for the J-lits, dazzling the opposing
batters with the "stuff" he put on the'
ball. Tommy Trelfa showed up in as

Rev. Douglas speaks on "The Burn- Tickets for the J-Hop will he
ing of the Ibernia," Congregational on sale at a table in the Michi
church, 10:30 o'clock. Union tomorrow and will be on
Cosmopolitan Club meets, NewberrI daily until all of the 300 tickets
hall, 2:30 o'clock. sold. For the first three days tic]
Union service, Hill auditorium, 7:00 will be sold to Juniors only and c
o'clock. one to a person, and on Thursday
J Hop committee meets, Union, 3:00 I sale will be open to all stude
o'clock. Booth tickets will go on sale at
Polonia Club meets, McMillan hall, same time, the reservations to
2:00 o'clock. made later. Twelve or more b
TOMORROW tickets mist be shown by those -
Eugene V. Debs, Newberry hall, 8:00 desire a booth. Those who do
o'clock. make reservations will be placed
J Hop tickets go on sale to Juniors the committee.
at Union. A meeting of the Hop commi

ing teams, have an abundance of ma-AI to the management of the rink. Tick-
terial to choose from. ets may be obtained at George Moe's
The grand march will start at 7:30, J Athletic Supply store on North Uni-
all skaters participating. The music versity. The usual price of admission
will be furnished by a local band, and to the rin k, 15 cents, will be charged.

great style in the practice game as
(Continued on Page Eight)

I_ i

he Social service meeting at Methodist will be held at the
I church, 7:00 o'clock. o'clock this afternoon.

Union at

_

. .__H._
- I U

THIRD UNION SERVICE

Hill
Auditorium
Tonight
7 O'clock

Music by

DR.

WILLIAM

ROSENAU

PROF. OF SEMITICS, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Choir of
Temple Beth
Detroit
William Howland
Director

Subject: The Place of Authority In Life.

Under guspices of the Jewish Student Congregation

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