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January 14, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-14

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THE DAIPY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
*1 THlE CAMPUS

The

Mich igan

ijaily

Phones:-Editorlal 2414
Business 960
N~EW YORK WU

_____________________________ --~--- -~..----~- -----~ --- -

VOL XXVI. No. 75.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

__----~1

STUDENT COUNCIL Louis Hall Comes
Back from France
ITesiniistic Rgarding Early Cessation
I....S EP oof Hostilities: Hold Services
SAFEGnU LIVES ou" .he AN.mall
159[[ RRULoui P. allJr., late of the Ameri-

COMMITTEE OF 3 APPOINTED TO
TREAT WITH EASTERN MICHI-
AN EDISON COMPANY
10 INVESTIGATE FIRE RISKS

can ambulance corps serving in
France, returned to Ann Arbor Wed-
nesday afternoon, bringing with him
trophies of war and the remembrances
of some thrilling experiences while at
the front in Alsace-Lorraine. Mr. Hall
is one of the Dartmouth students who
volunteered as ambulance drivers last
year, and is the brother of Richard N.
Hall, ex-'15, who was kiiled Christ-
mas evee while pursuing his duty.
A rather pessimistic viewpoint re-

Pass Reso actionis t40Sympathy
d1re 8pel to aniIIy of Labe
Harold I Ron

Ad.

Conference M a rs
AMERICANS AGAIN WARNED TO KEEP Cneen er
Tour Addresses
4 Mrs. Prince, iSnjow.:iMrs. WIallce
OUT OF LAWLESS PARTS OF MEXICO~ [s ~io U'. ioi )r . ale
and Dr liar Cen '1 'k to Ini-
BANDIT iS SLAYAf NOTHER; HUERTA IE 0FERI 111FFU(TOA
INTENSE FEELING IN CONGRESS OVER SITUATION; PRESIDENTw
WILSON MAINTAINS OLD STAND; SECRETARY TO HUERTA ndthekeynoteoe f haroush eratt
ATTRIBUTES HIS DEATH TO TREATMENT OFt eenote oflforse a tthe
U. S. AUTHORITIES initial meetings of the se ond annual
Vocational Conference in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall yesterdlay afternoon
U.S, CITIZENS ORGANIZE MILITARY BODY AT EL PASO, TEXAS and evenin.
Mrs. LucindaPrince, head of the
School for Salesmanshin in Boston,
Plan to Equip Selves as Cavalry and to Scour Mountains for Bandits was the first speaker at. the evening
Who Have Committed Crimes Recently; Rumored That Captain of meeting. The subject of her lecture
Band That Killed IS Americans ias Been Captured Near was "Opportunities for College Wom-
Chihuahua City en in Department Store Work." Ac-
(By Y. Sun Service.) cording to Mrs. Prince great depart-
theN.niere)ment stores all over the country are
Issues New Warning ed from Carranza sources this morn- eager to secure "Educational Direc-
Washington, Jan. 13.--Secretary of ing that General Jose Rodriguez, con- tors," "Service Directors" and "Effi-;
State Lansing this afternoon issued mander of the bandits who murdered ciency 'Directors." Women in these
another warning to Americans to get the 18 Americans west of Chihuahua positions command exceptionally high;
out and stay out of the lawless sec- on Monday, has been made a prisoner salaries.
tions of Mexico. The warning was I by Mexicans and Americans in the Miss Mary Snow brought the open-
issued following the receipt of offi- Madera district, northwest of- Chihua- ing session to a close. Miss Snow is
huiia City. The story that Amnerican ssinsoacls. isSnwi
cial confirmation of the killing of an- hua C icans Field Secretary of the Intercollegiatea
other American citizen by Villista I"le the capture is discredited since Bureau of Occupations.r
mbandits, sixty miles west of Santa the number of Americans in and At the afternoon session Mrs. Gary
Isabel, where Monday's massacre oc- around Madera is small, and not many Wallace of the editorial staff of the I
curred. Likewise there was received of those known to be in the vicinity ) Ladies' Home Journal spoke on thej
a renewal of assurances to the secre- are believed to be of the sort to un- "open door" for women in the -pro-
tary of Elizeo Arrendendo, Carranza's dertake the capture of bandits. fession of pharmaceutical chemistry.
ambassador to the United States, that Another point, Rodriguez is not be- "This profession is not a new one,"
the Carranza government would live leved to have had time to get back to said M'rs. Wallace, "and the field is not,
up to its assurances given at the time Madera from the scene of the execu- crowded."

ADMIT FALL OF MONi

GERMAN.S ASSUME
ARM STICE DECLARED BETWEI
NONTENEGRO AND
AUSTRIA

garding the close of the war in the
Vigorous measures to safeguard the near future is held by Mr. Hall, but
lives of students against the dangers he feels that the ambulance work is
of the Huron river were decided upon a most worthy cause, and may return
by the Student Council at their meet- to France. The decision of Prof.
ing last evening. A committee of Louis P. Hall, of the dental college,
three men was appointed to work in and Mrs. Hall, his parents, will de-
conjunction with the city authorities, ternine his course of action.,
the Eastern Michigan Edison company The Rev. Henry Tatock, of the Epis-
and the Ann Arbor Civic Society in copal church, will conduct a memorial
an attempt to break the spell which service for Richard N. Hall to corin-
this stream seems to have over the memorate his life, service and death,
University. eat r1:30 o'clock Sunday morning in
Ri. C. Rumnmel, '16L, was chosen St. Andrew's church. Mr. Tatlock is
chairman of this committee with G. anxious that the congregation be
L. Cook, '17, and H. C. Allen, '16H, seated before the beginning of the
as assistants. In order to further the service, to which everyone is invited.
work suggestions will be gladly re- The music as well as the sermon

,

ceived from any who wish to offer
them. Among the measures discussed
at the meeting was the plan of having
a number of signs placed on the river
bank, at boat houses, and at the power
house, stating where ropes, life pre-
servers and boats could be found in
case of accident.
Owing to the belief that many frat-
ernity and sorority houses are inade-
quately protected against fire, espe-
cially in the matter of rope fire es-
capes from the third floor, President
T. P. Soddy, '16E, appointed a com-
mittee to look carefully into the pre-
vailing conditions with a view to ad,
vising suitable reforms. In this work
the Student Council solicits the co-
operation of all. This committee is
composed of W. M. Schafer, '16, chair-
man, and Harold Henderson, '16M.
The Council passed resolutions of
sympathy addressed to the family of
1II. F. Korn, '17L, who recently met
death in the Huron river R. S. Col-
lins, '16, was appointed to write the
resolutions with the aid of H. L.I
Carroll, '17E.
On Wednesday night the semi-an-
nual election of officers for the Council
will take place, This meeting, as
are all others connected with that
body, is open to the public. According
to the constitution, officers must be
elected twice each year, thus limit-
ing a term to six months. The new
officials will be installed immediately.
President T. P. Soddy and R. S. Col-
lins will retire from the Council at
the end of this semester as their
term of membership then expires.
During the next week election of three
new members will take place. The
following classes are to be repre-
sented by one person each: junior
law, junior engineers and junior lits.
Three members of the Council will
be assigned to take charge of the
elections and adequate notice will be
given of the date for this event.
BRIDGE PLAY BEGINS TONIGHT,

will be of a special nature, fitting to
the occasion.
FRENCH FACUTY O CT
IN PLAY ~lA9GRAMMI"
Cercle to hold Informal Dance After
Comedy by Eugene
Labiche
Five members of the faculty of the
French department will make up the
cast of the comedy entitled "La Gram-
mnaire" which will be given on the
evening of January 2 in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall, as the fourth num-
ber on the year's program of the Cer-
cle Francais.
In addition to the comedy, several
musical numbers will be offered, and,
after the play an informal dance will
be held on the first floor of the same
building.
The associate membership tickets
which are being sold for 50 cents by
members of the Cercle entitle students
to admission. Those not having tick-
ets will be charged the same amount.
SWING SAYS ROUMANIA
CAN DECIDE GRET A
Berlin War Correspondent Talks To}
Students About European I
Conflict
"When Roumania enters the war,
the war's close is imminent," declared
Raymond E. Swing, Berlin war cor-
respondent of the Chicago Daily News,
in a talk before students of journal-
ism and others yesterday afternoon.
He also called attention to the fact
that Bucharest dispatches furnish a
reliable barometer of the war, for al-
though Roumania's army has many
times been massed on the frontier, she
will never enter the war until assured
of the outcome. Germany's actions, he
stated, are entirely to be explained in
the ligh of the definition of the
great von Clausewitz: "War, is a
forceful continuation of policy."
One of the most interesting facts
brought out during the course of the
talk was that Bulgaria, at the time
she entered the war with the Central
Powers, could, if she had entered on
the side of the Allies, have taken Con-
stantinople in a three-weeks' cam-

of its recognition.
While feeling in Congress over the
latest Mexican outrages continued to-
day to grow in intensity, the President
still maintains his determination to
deal with the situation through the
Carranza government. At both the
White House and the State Depart-
ment it was apparent that everything
possible was being done to stand off
any acts which would force the gov-
ernment into armed intervention. The
fact was emphasized again today by
the President as well as the state de-
partment officials that the Am ricAns-
who were murdered at Chihuahua had
been warned not to enter Mexico.

tion. Feeling is running high among
Americans here. A meeting was held
last night and plans set on. foot to;
organize an American legion for the
avowed purpose of going into Mexico
in the case of intervention to avenge
the death of other Americans by hunt-
ing down bands of bandits. These
Americans would squip themselves
as cavalry and would make it their
duty to scour the mountains for the
bandits that have committed depreda-
tions recently.
HUERT A FO}RIVES ENEMIES
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 13.-General Vic-
toriano Huerta, former dictator and

Resolutions were again introduced provisional president of Mexico, died
in Congress looking toward armed in- at 8:35 o'clock this evening. His
tervention and speeches were deliver- death had momentarily been ex-
ed indicating deep feeling. In issuing pected since yesterday afternoon. Hist
his warning today, Secretary Lansing will was signed last night following
said: "I would again urge-Americans the administration of the last Catho-
to keep out of all sections of Mexico lic rites. Ie asked his lawyer to say
while lawless conditions still exist. that he had forgiven his enemies.
If Americans go into such territory This afternoon, General Robels, his
they take their chances." private secretary, issued the follow-
Secretary Lansing said he would ing: "i the actual moment of grav-
address a new set of instructions to ity in General Huerta's condition I
American consuls in Mexico reiterat- only wish to state regarding the un-
ing those of last October which direct- just and cruel treatment given him
ed the consuls to employ riders, if by the United States government.
necessary, to carry to Americans in Tbat treatment is responsible for his
danger areas the warning to return present condition. When he was Presi-
to the United States. The secretary did dent of Mexico he gave all guarantees
not specify in his warning the sections to Americans regardless of the many
where lawless conditions still exist. difficulties he had met with in his ad-
He said Americans must use their ministration. In this country he was
own common sense in the matter. The thrown in jail like a common criminal
department, however, has received and his health completely broken
word that besides the areas in west- down, causing his death."
ern Chihuahua where the recent mur-
ders occurred, the states of Durango :NEW REVOLTS IN MEXICO
and Sonora are also in the danger S.-ep
zone.San Antonio, Jan. 18.-Reports from
zone. mn states in Mexico indicate that
Ambassador Arrendendo in a state- anyolts are breaking out against the
ment issued tonight from the Mexican
embassy, referred to the killing of the hns rule, beca se ofcials.heFor-
Americans as regrettable, deplorable he o fsoials. om
and atrocious, but as was the case of Villa soldiers are said to be joining
various revolutionary leaders and are
Cnrrtar T~nci~r ~a t~r:3 he

Dr. Gillette Hayden urged that more
college women consider dentistry as
a profession.. "The average woman
dentist easily earns from $900 to $3000
a year," he said; "her income is lim-
ited only by her strength and time."
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris and
Dr. Earl Barnes of Philadelphia will
speak at the afternoon session today.
Governor Ferris has not announced
(Continued on Page Six)
MICHIGANENSIAN SALES
NEARLY EXHAUST ANNUALS
Ynraternities Must 1 urryWith Orders;
t edics GITen /Opportunity,
to Secure Copies
The last day of the Michiganen-
sian subscription sale opens with the
edition of one thousand books nearly
exhausted. The staff wishes to an-
nounce that with but few exceptions
the fraternity and sorority houses
have not yet sent in orders for their
copies of the annual. Inasmuch as
it takes nearly a hundred copies to
supply this demand, it will be nec-
essary for these oranizations to take
immediate action in order to secure
the boojs.
For the benefit of senior medics,
whose work keeps them at the uni-
versity hospitals and who consequent-
ly have not had an opportunity to
place subscriptions, a man will be sta-
tioned at the law building this after-
noon at 5:00 o'clock, to whom the
medics can hand subscriptions when
they attend class there at'that hour.

lBulmaiians Show Increasing Spirit
to Oppose German
Alliance
Rome. Jan. 13.-According to news
received through diplomatic circles
from Bucharest, the Germans have
assumed complete control in Bulgaria
which has been deprived of economic
and financial independence. German
troops garrison the principal towns,
including Sofia. The general staff cf
the Bulgarian army and Bulgar-
ian railways, police and censorship
are controlled by Germans. A spe-
cial commission of German officers
is requisitioning food stuffs without
limit, on the pretext of re-provision-
ing the' army.-
According to all information avail-
able the officers are, sending supplies,
especially wheat, to Germany. The
provisions are paid for in German
paper money at a compulsory ex-
change rate of 27 per cent. The
local currency has depreciated. Dis-
content is widespread and anti-German
feeling is growing. The Bulgarians
openly express regret at the alliance
with the Germans. Czar Ferdinand
is indignant but powerless. He does
not dare to oppose the Germans and
he fears the loss of ┬░his throne.
Austrians Control Montenegro
London, Jan. 13.-Another decisive
stage in the Balkan situation has
been reached with Montenegro now
following Serbia in being virtually
absorbed by the invading forces. It
was learned tonight that Austria and
Montenegro had come to an armistice,
this being construed as the last act
of the little country after having its
capital, Cettinje, dominated after the
Austrian capture of Mount Loveen.
That King Nicholas will continue the
unequal struggle. is considered doubt-
ful here by the accepted few among
the best posted men in London. That
Montenegro has virtually passed un-
der Austrian control is admitted. The
chief significance of this does not lie
in the small territorial acquisition
which is less than Serbia, but in Monl-
tenegro's Adiatic front lying along the
Austrian offensive naval base of Cat-
taro, where today's dispatches an-
nounce the entire Austrian fleet, in-
cluding three dreadnoughts as as-
sembling, and from which the recent
naval raid against Italian troops to
the relief of Serbia was conducted.
DECIDE ON 191RULES
FOR THIS YEAR'S 1-HOP

...R

WHAT'S GOING ON

Prohibit "Moon-Light" Dances;
prove Spirit Shown Last
Year

A p-

Expect Interesting Contest;
.hat More Men Enter

Urge

The Union bridge tournament, which
starts at the Michigan Union tonight,
bids fair to be one of the most inter-
esting and hotly contested ever held.
Four rounds are to be held in the
tournament every Friday night, begin-
ning with this evening and lasting
for five Fridays, with three weeks
omitted during exam week and the
night of the J-Hop.
While play will begin tonight, the

secretary tansng, ne piacea Ee
blame on the victims for failing to
heed the warning to keep out of the
danger territory. Up to a late hour
tonight neither the state department
nor the Mexican embassy had received
confirmation of the massacre of 16
other Americans at Madera, Chihua-
hua.
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 13.-Official an-
nouncement was made tonight that
General Elias Calles, Carranza com-
mander in Sonora, was preparing to
send 5,000 men from Sonora into Chi-
huahua to help exterminate General
Villa and other bandits now operating
there.
In official quarters here it is report-

being supplied with arms and ammu-
nition from Chihuahua, Torreon, Du-
rango, and the surrounding territory.
Word comes that Americans who
have gone into the country, because
of assurances of safety and a respon-
sible government, are now in great
peril. There is indignation over the
murder of the sixteen unarmed Amer-
icans, which is feared to the only the
first of similar acts.y
U-NOTICE
Girls' Glee Club meets at Rent-
schler's Studio, 9:00 o'clock tomorrow
morning, for Michiganensian picture..
Wear light dress.

Weather for Ann Arbor and
ity--Snow and much colder,
heavy northwest winds.
TODAY

vicin.
with

Craftsmen confer
Arbor Lodge tonight,
at 7:30 o'clock.
All fresh track
o'clock trophy room,
Alpha Nu meeting,
U. H.
Mid-West debate
o'clock, 302 N. W.

degree for Ann
Masonic Temple
meeting, 7:15
Waterman gym.
7:00 o'clock, 401
tryouts, 3:00

The rules of the 1916 J-Hop are to
govern the big mid-year function this
year also, as the result of a joint meet-
ing held yesterday afternoon by rep-
resentatives of the University Sen-
ate with the Hop committee.
While there was no formal re-enact-
ment of the regulations, an under-
standing was reached that the dance
is to be conducted in conformitywith
the same rules that were laid down
last year. These include the pro-
hibition of "moon-light" dances.
In the opinion of the faculty mem-
bers who met with the Hop commit-
tee, the spirit of the J-Hop a year
ago was excellent.

i

paign. By her action she indefinitely

committee in charge of the affair prolonged activities, and just now,
urges that more men enter at once, apart from unexpected developments,
as there is still room for more players. (Continued on Page Six)

All-Fresh meetin
Waterman gym.
Students' recital,
4:15 o'clock.

ng, 2:30 o'clock
School of Music,

1h _. l

LAST

CHANCE

TODAY

r I,

TO SUBSCRIBE FOR THE MICHICANENSIAN
The edition is nearly sold out, and extra oopies not subsoribed for will not be ordered after this week. It will cost you fifty cents to make
sure of your copy. The balance of $2.00 is paid at time of delivery.
NOTICE-Presidents of fraternities, sororities and clubs, are advised to arrange today for the subscription of a copy of this book for their house.
TABLES TODAY:-Main Library-Engineering Building-Dental Building.

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