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January 13, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICI&IG-AN DAILY

I

Can You Take Pictures?

C'

This may seem an unimportant question, but it is not.
Photography plays such an important part in every walk
of life nowadays, that no college man can afford to go
into the world without it.
Come in and talk it over with me.
LYNDON
The Kodak Store of Ann Arbor 719 N. tUniversity

DON WIT TELLEP&CO.
Jib ci;0eia//// cS'Ao/ nrz/n
FIFTH AVEN UE AT 38TH STREET
NEW YORK
"Comme PMademoiselle est Charmante"

r

J

I

PROFESSOR HILONER
TELLS OF FOREIGNERS
"Cosmopolitanism" Treated in Speech
Before Fresh Engineer
Assembly
"Cosmopolitanism" formed the basis
for a speech given by Professor J. A.
C. Hildner iat the fresh engineer as-
sembly Wednesday morning, in which
he dilated upon the significance at-
tached to "La Revue des Nations," or
the Review of the Nations, as indicat-
ing the growing importance and ac-
tivity of the foreign students in the
University.
"Through association with students
from lands other than America," Pro-
fessor Hildner said, "one broadens his
outlook upon life and realizes the im-
portance of the brotherhood of man,
which is symbolized bythe Cosmopoli-
tan club motto, 'Above all things, hu-
manity.'
This motto, he stated, will soon ap-
pear o State street'as part of the first
metropolitan sign to be shown in Ann
Arbor in advertisement of "La Revue
des Nations."
PR"AC'AL KILLING
BUSINESS OF WAR
(Continued from Page One)
States, gave many interesting side-
lights of life in the trenches and sev-
eral exact pictures of the types of
men now fighting in the Allied cause.
"What is characteristic of one army
is characteristic of another," he
said, "and much of the courtesy of
the soldiers is overlooked in our de-
sire for real news of the war. The
aviation corps are providing the real
chivalry of the war, and the closest
similarity exists between them and
the ancient yeoman of old.
"The test of a good soldier, nowa-
days, is his ability to build a trench,"
he continued, "and the Canadian con-
tingent have proved 'themselves very
proficient along this line. 'We have
to,' one Canadian said, 'if we don't,
they'll blow our bloomin' blocks off.'
At Mons. the British retreat was stop-
ped by the common British 'Tommies,'
who declared themselves too tired to
run any more, and said they were
going to lay down and 'pop at the
beggars a while."'"
Mr. Palmer, in the course of his ad-
dress said that the German shells
have all been named by the allied
troops and they can be recognized by1
the sound they make just before
bursting.,- "Percy," he said, is a smartt
little shell of high velocity and kills
you before you know it, while on the
other hand, "Jack Johnson" is a "ninef
point two" of a low velocity and can1
be heard coming several seconds be-
fore it strikes, singing the song "I
kill-I kill-I kill" until it bursts with]
a reverberation that demolishes
everything around it.
In speaking of the wonderful Brit-]
ish navy, Mr. Palmer said, "Many
of the poorest ships among the 3,000
that comprise the British navy, arel
better than our best dreadnoughts..
After spending some time with thisl
great navy, I have only one word to1
say to the American nation, and that<
it that I would sooner have ships on
the Atlantic to keep an enemy off than
to dig trenches in New York or New
Jersey. I have seen both kinds of
warfare."
Mr. Palmer has a remarkable fund
of informaticn and an unusually fine
collections of slides and moving pic-t

Matinees WAeh~Kek ot
and Satay G RRICK "an, Ith
DETROIT
MAY IRWIN in
" 33 Washington Square"

ii

w"er. 4?
tt, i;
i t
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:
}

ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30
Thursday, Jan. 13-"Elny of Stork's
Nest," Mary Miles :Minter. A Metro,
return date.
Friday, Jan. 14-"The House of Tears,"
a strong Metro feature with irnily
Stevens as the star.a
Saturday. Jan. r5.- Irene Renwick in
sThe Commuters." Kleine return.Also
Iart Ten of "Te Trip Around the
World" series.

The charm of these evening gowns for the "jeune fille"-is the charm
of denture old-fashioned ness <-omlined with French esprit.-Hats,
lIonses, Taillers, Boots, Accessories, Sports Apparel, "lntimate
Wear"-eachi with individual charm to impart to their wearer.

QUESTIONS IN REGARD TO AFFAIRS OF FASHION
BE ANSWERED PROMPTLY, INTERESTEDLY AND
AUTHORITY.

WILL
WIT4

-

-Rings
Michigan Pins
Fobs

Pendants Novelties
Lockets

Factory Hat Store
118 E. Huron St.

Parisian Ivory Leather Goods Silverware

Gold Pocket Knives

Chains

Pencils

Famous Prianist 's
Career Is Unique
Paderewski, Who Comes Isere January
20, an Unknown Alusieian
in 1884
If the career of Paderewski, who
will be heard in Hill Auditorium
Thursday evening, January 20, as a
virtuoso has been unique in the an-
nals of music, so also may be called
his preparation for that career.
As a rule the usual virtuoso is either
a "wonder child" or else by the time
he has entered his teens he has had a
solid primary training in his art and
is possessor of a technique far beyond
the reach of any but the most gifted
amateurs. With Paderewski, however,
this was not the case. He himself tells
us that when he was sixteen his tech-
nique was so inadequate that he was
always forced to make improvisations
of his own in hard passages, hoping
that none of his audience would be
the wiser. It was not until he was
twenty-four that he set himself seri-;
ously at the gigantic task of accom-
plishing in a few years of his maturity
what others spent a lifetime on.
In 1884 Paderewski was a poor. un-
known musician whose threadbare
clothes differed no whit from the
threadbare clothes of thousands of
other' poor, unknown musicians that
swarm the streets of Berlin and Vi-
enna. His own friends did not suspect
the genius that lay within him. Four
years later Vienna, Berlin and Paris
were talking about the marvelous,
Pole, the pupil of Leschetitsky, who
was giving a new message of beauty
with his piano. Two years more,
London fairly fought to attend his re-
citals and in 1891 he began the series
of triumphant tours of America, the,
like of which has never been seen.
Paderewski has triumphed as a,
pianist not merely because he is a
pianist but because of his extraor-
dinary sympathetic interpretive mind,
which. illumines and clarifies all that
it comes in contact with. Perhaps it is
a fair presumption that this is due
in large measure to theyears of strug-
gle against poverty and misfortunes
of all kinds.
tures, and the touches of humor andl
pathos withbvhich he interspersed hisI
lecture made it one of the most ef-I
fective numbers on the oratoricali
course thus far.f
Previous to his address last night.,

FINE WATCH AND
JEWELRY REPAIRING

HAL L ER JEWELRY CO.
State Street Jewelers

1
SLAUGHTER OF 17 AI1ERICANS
BRINGS MEXICAN CRISIS
(Continued from Page One)
sued passports to them. Nevertheless,
in his representations to Carranza he
laid stress on the fact that since the
occupation of Chihuahua state by the
Carranza forces many Americans had
returned there "with the consent of
the military authorities of the de facto
government."

NEW TICKET SALES FOR
Necessary to Change Method
of Scalping in Past

UNION
Because

Whitney Theatre
TOMORROW
George
A r~iss
<PAGAINI
Some
Good
Seats
SHTil
Left
5OacT5c-$1 .O-$1 .5O-$2

The Union will inaugurate a new
system of ticket selling in connection
with their weekly dance Saturday
night. It will be necessary for this
dance and for all others following that
the purchaser of a ticket present his
Union membership card when he buys
the ticket. There will be a number
on each ticket sold which will be re-
corded with the number of the mem-
bership card, so that the committee
can at all times tell just who is pre-
senting the ticket. This system has
been made necessary because of the
ticket scalping which has been going
on all semester.
The committee in charge of ar-
rangements for this week's dance is:
R. W. Collins, '17E, chairman; W. W.
Sanderson, '17E; H. A. Gustin, '18; Leo
Covey, '17E. The chaperones will be
Prof. W. R. Humphries and Mrs. Hum-
phries and Mr. L. J. Rouse and Mrs.
Rouse. Tickets will go on sale at 5:00
o'clock today.
Root Not a Presidential Candidate
St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 12.-Secretary
of State Schmahl received from Elihu
Root today a telegram saying he was
not a candidate for the Republican
presidential nomination and request-
ing that his name be kept off the
Minnesota primary ballot. Th'e sec-
retary replied that he would accede
to the request.

-

Wt MEN SURVIVE
FIRST OPERA
(Continued from Page One)

CUT

Pritzger, '17L; L. Inwood, '18.
The committee in charge, acting un-
der the advice of the new director, re-
quests that all cast men have their
parts learned to the letter by the time
the director returns, so that no time
will be lost in the progress of the
production. Cast men are to keep in
touch with Theron D. Weaver, '16E,
general chairman, so that they may
be informed of alterations in any of
their lines.
The new director and- Homer Heath,
of the Michigan Union, will go to De-
troit today, where the selection of
scenery and other stage requirements
will be looked after. From Detroit,
Director Morgan leaves" for -New Ha-
ven, where he is in charge of an-
other theatrical production.

TONIGHT 1 1I5AmUICMats., Fri., Sat.e
7:3 an RliJ 700 Seats 1t0
SEATS GOING FAST GET THEM NOW
POSITIVELY THE BIGGEST MUSICAL COMEDY EVER SEEN IN VAUDEVILLE
PRODUCED BY W. B. FRIEDLANDER, OF "NIGHT CLERK" FAME
THE F rOVU BANDS"
Book by Will H. Hough-Music by W. B. Friedlander
A COMPLETE SCENIC PRODUCTION ELECTRICAl. EFFECTS
AND THE CHORUS -- WELL, THEY ARE DREAMS
THE $100,000 PHOTOPLAY STAR
SUNDAY WILLIAM FARNUM in "The Broken Law"

Mr. Palmer was entertained at a din- Artistic portraits are made at the
ner tendered him by the staff of The Hoppe Studio, 619 E. Liberty.
Michigan Daily. jan13,14,15

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