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October 12, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND

The

Mich igan

Vol. XXVI. No. 7.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1915.

'Y'CAPAINS 1FOR
200 0 MEMBERS IN
2-HURCANVSS
YOST, LAWTON, REIMANN, PINNEY
AND RUMMEL TO SPEAK
AT BANQUET
COMMITTEE OF 100 TO WORK
Success of Today's Effort Will Make
Organization the Largest
in World
Coach Fielding H. Yost, J. Fred
Lawton '11, Lewis Reimann '16, N. E.
Pinney '16, and General Chairman
Henry Rummel '16L are the speakers
who have been selected to speak to
the Committee of 100 of the Y. M. C.
A., which will banquet at Newberry
hall at 5:30 o'clock this afternoon.
The banquet is to be held preparatory
to the committee's one-night canvass
for the 2,000 Y. M. C. A. members
that are necessary to make the Mich-
igan student's "Y" the "largest as well
as the oldest organization of its kind
in the world."
"How the assurance of the new
building will demand work on a larger
scale" will be the theme of Coach Yost,
who has been intimately connected
with the building campaign since the
early part of August. Lewis Reimann
will outline the various plans for the
enlarged work for this coming year.
Earl Pinney will furnish the actual
information as to just how the can-
vass is to be carried on. Chairman
Henry Rummel will act as toastmas-
ter and is expected to contribute to
the sum total of enthusiasm, and as
usual in recent "Y" membership cam-
paigns, J. Fred Lawton, erstwhile
comedian, song-writer and general
campus practitioner, has been secured
to give one of his famous "pep talks."
At the final meeting of the execu-
tive committee last evening the final
arrangements were made for the can-
vass of the fraternities. A man has
been secured in each organization who
has agreed to canvass all of the mem-
bers. In this way the committee feels
that it will be able to save much time
in actual canvassing.
Lewis Reimann, '16, president of
the "Y" for this year, when seen last
evening, said: "Because of the heavy
building campaign and of the $40,000
still to be raised from outside sources,
the 'Y' will have to depend this year
more than ever upon 'student mem-
berships. Let me say that we are
planning to enlarge in every field be-
cause of our increased committee
force, and since the memberships can
be taken out at any sum from a dollar
up, we expect to get the necessary
2,000 members."
The campaign will last only two
hours and a half, as the men will be
asked to report at the "Y" office to
Philip Lovejoy, '16, at 10 o'clock.
PROTEST AGAINST ACTION OF
ENGLISH SENT TQ PRESIDENT
State Department Objects in Note to
British Intervention in
American Trade
Washington, Oct. 11.-The State
Department submitted a note to Pres-
ident Wilson today protesting against
Great Britain's intervention in Amer-
ican trade. It is believed that the

president will give his attention to
the matter within the next few days.
Ever since the sinking of the liner
Arabic was disavowed by the German
government last week, diplomats have
been awaiting the drafting of a note
to the Triple Entente protesting
against intervention in American
trade. Having finished with Germany,
it looks as if President Wilson will
send a strong note to Great Britain.

ENTERTANS LATIN AND GREEK
STUDENTS THURSDAY NIGHT
Professor Kelsey to Give Informal
Affir in Memorial
Hall
Students in the Latin and Greek de-
partments will be entertained Thurs-
day at an informal reception given by
Dr. Francis W. Kelsey in his rooms
in the basement of the Memorial hall
building. The members of the Latin
and Greek faculties and their wives
will also be in attendance.
The reception will be primarily for
the benefit of the new students in
these departments, and an extra in-
ducement to attend is the promise of
refreshments.
The members of the Classical club
are requested to be on hand at 7:30
o'clock for a short meeting which will
be held in room A of the same build-
ing, previous to the reception.
The club will begin the year with-
out a vice-president. Ralph M. Car-
son, '17, has resigned his position as
president of the organization, and his
place will be taken by Miss Myrtle
Young. Miss Virginia Straughn will
be secretary for the year, and Clar-
ence Hunter, treasurer.
UNDERCLSSES TO HOLD
PEPI SESSIONS FOR USH
First Year Class to Meet Tomorrow
With Sophs Gathering
Thursday
r-
Arrangements for the Fresh-Soph
fall games, which will take place Sat-
urday morning on Ferry Field, are
well under way, according to R. S.
Collins, '16, who is chairman of the
event. Mass meetings for the under-
classmen have been planned for to-
morrow evening and Thursday.
Tomorrow night the freshmen will
meet at 7:00 o'clock in the west phys-
ics lecture room. Waldemar A. P.
John, '16, editor of the Gargoyle, has
been secured to preside at the "pep"
session. Maurice Dunne, '17L, and
John Maulbetsch, '17P, of the Varsity
football squad, will talk to the year-
lings, impressing upon them the ne-
cessity of valiantly defending the ban-
ners of 1919. T. P. Soddy, '16E, pres-
ident of the student council, will in-
struct the freshmen in regard to the
rules and regulations to be observed
during the contests. The contests this
fall will consist in the flag rush and
the cane spree. Harold Smith, '16,
Varsity track captain, will conduct the
cheering.
The sophomores will have an op-
portunity to acquire their "pep" on
Thursday evening, when a mass meet-
ing will 'be held for them at 7:00
o'clock in the west physics lecture
room. The speakers for this meeting
will be announced later.
WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Y. M. C. A. membership campaign
starts.
Cross country team meeting, Water-
man gym, 7:15 o'clock.
Business meeting of Commerce club,
. 104 Economics building, 7:15 o'clock.
Master Masons' smoker, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Adelphi House of Representatives
meets, Adelphi rooms, 7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW

Union membership campaign starts.
Michigan Library association meets,
Alumni Memorial hall.
Fresh assembly, U hall, 11:00 o'clock.
Football, Marietta vs. Michigan, Ferry
Field, 4:05 o'clock.
Prof. T. E. Rankin speaks, Y. M. C. A.,
5:00 o'clock.
Forestry club meeting, 216 new sci-
ence building, 7:30 o'clock.

VILLA ON RMPAE AS
WASINGTON ECLRES
EMBARGO IS IN EFFECT
Huerta Endorses Action of American
Republics in Recognizing
Carranza
U. S. WARNS AMERICANS
TO LEAVE CHIHUAHUA REGION
MEXICAN CHIEF DECLARES NO
MORE FORMAL BATTLES
WILL OCCUR
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 11.-Strict em-
bargo on arms to any part of Mexico
under the sway of General Villa went
into effect today. Following this or-
der, the state department warned all
Americans in Chihuahua to leave at
once.
A report received here says that
Villa is again spreading terror
throughout the country, robbing
houses, destroying crops and causing
general consternation.
In a statement made here today,
Victoriano Huerta, former president
of Mexico, heartily indorsed the ac-
tion of the United States and the
South American republics in recog-
nizing Carranza.
Carranza Tours Northern Mexico
Vera Cruz, Oct. 11.-Carranza, the
newly recognized head of the Consti-
tutional government in Mexico, left
here today for a rather extended tour
of the northern states of Mexico. J.
W. Belt, of the state department, ac-
companied him on his trip. Santillo
and Tampico will be the chief points
he will touch. At the latter place he
will hold 'a conference with General
Obregon.
Pleased to Learn of Recognition
Vera Cruz, Oct. 11.-General Car-
ranza yesterday received with great
pleasure the news of his recognition
by the United States and the South
American republics. He also stated
that he had received no official noti-
fication of this decision.
"There will be no more formal bat-
tIes. Fighting of that sort has a-
ready ended, but naturally the strug-
gle to put down minor odtbreaks and
lawlessness must be continued for a
greater or less time in a country such
as this, where there are . extensive
open areas."
MAKE AWARDS TO WOMEN FOR
WORK IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
Sweater, Pins and Arm Bands Given
to Leaders Under New
System
Miss Alice Evans, physical director
of Barbour gymnasium, last spring
instituted a point system for women
similar to that used in all campus
activities. In this system, points were
awarded for participation in the va-
rious sports open to women, and at
the end of the season various insignia
were given for points earned. For
thirty points an "M" arm band, spe-
cially designed, was given; for sixty,
an "M" pin in sterling silver, and for
one hundred points, a sweater.
In June, 131 women had points to
their credit. Of these, Elsa Drittler,
'15, was awarded a sweater; Ger-
trude Royle, '15, and Ada Inglis, '15,
were given silver pins, while Laura
Miller, '16, Elizabeth Kennedy, '16,
Helen Vandermeer, -'16, Janet Macfar-
land, '17, Jeanette Armstrong, '17, and
Ruth MacLachlan, '18, were awarded

"M" arm bands.
Ten points were given for a per-
fect record in gymnastics during
1914-'15. The following women re-
ceived such an award: Marion Gal-
ton, '18, Georgiana Pockman, '18, Lou-
ise Garaghty, '18, Helen Aherns, '18.
Ruth MacLach '18, Constance Winch-
ell, '18, Alice Woessner, '18, Laura
Miller, '16, and Marie Fluegel, '18.

I

I; -.

I

Keeps 300 Men in School
-------------
Weekly "Mai" Meetings

THE Y. M. C. A. WANTS YOU
TONIGHT
THINK IT OVER!

1

Reading Room

[l

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