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January 13, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-13

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THE DAILY
a NEWS OF TE WORLD AND
THlE CAMPUS

The Michigan

Daily

Phones:-Editorial 2414
EEBsness. 960
TELEGRAPH SERTICE BY T

VOL. XXVI. No. 74.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

. . y

MICHIGAN WOMEN
IN SECOND ANNUAL
VOCATIONAL MEETI

F.W, WILLARD SPEAKS TODAYI

Iwill

Tell Engineer Upperclassmen
About Electric School

65 MEN SURVIVE
FIRST OPERA CUT-

EXAM SCHEDULES
ARE MADE PUBLIC
Time Set for Tests in Departments of
Literature, Engineering and
Architecture

Pennsy Freshman
Is Killed in Push
Si Othiers Injred in Class Fight:
Fatality First Since
Year of 1870

MRS. GARY WALLACE AND
HAYDEN WILL SPEAK
TODAY

R.

SESSIONS WILL OPEN AT 4:00
Secretary of Bureau of Occolp>ations
Principal Speaker
Tonight
"Have You a Vacation?" "Prepared-
ness," "Don't Be a Square Peg in a
Round Hole"- -these are the slogans
adopted by the Women's League to
introduce the second annual meeting
of the Vocational Conference which
begins at 4:00 o'clock today in Sarah
Caswell Angell Hall.
Mrs. Gary Wallace and Dr. Gillette
Hayden will grace the program at the
first session. Mrs. Wallace is a mem--
ber of the editorial staff of the Ladies'
Home Journal, and is deeply interest-
ed in vocational work for women. The
1 subject of her lecture will be "Phar-
maceutical Chemistry."
Dr. Gillette Hayden, who will share
the program with Mrs.'Wallace, is one
of the leading members of the dental
profession. Dr. Hayden took her de-
gree at Ohio State University, and her
graduate work at Northwestern Uni-
versity.
Miss Mary Snow, Field Secretary of
the New York Intercollegiate Bureau
of Occupations, will speak at the
Thursday evening session, and Lu-
cinda Price, head of the School for
Salesmanship in Boston, will say a
few words, commenting on her own
particular line of endeavor.
THREEFOURHS OF
YEAR BOOKS SOLD
Orders for Michiganensian Dispose of
Many Volumes; Only Two More
Days ,for Subscribing
SENIOR PICTURES CAUSE DELAY
According to results given out late
last night by the business staff of
the Michiganensian, the subscription
sale which' began Tuesday morning
has resulted in disposing of over
three-fourths of the thousand books
contracted for. In view of the fact
that but two days remain in which
subscriptions can be received, it is
imperative that all those who desire
books hand in their names at once,
since, as before announced,,no addi-
tional copies can be ordered after the
subscription list is closed at the end
of this week.s
Louis M. Bruch, managing editor
of the Michiganensian, desires to call
the attention of seniors to the fact that
assyet only about one-half of the mem-
bers of the senior classes have had
sittings for year book pictures. Un-
der the terms of the contracts made
with the official photographers, an ex-
tra charge will be made for all pic-
tures taken after February 1 and no
picture will, under any consideration,
be accepted later than February 15,
this date occurring just at the begin-
ning of the second semester, when
photographerswillnbe very busy. This
understanding was necessary in order
that the year book appear at the usual
time in the spring. Inasmuch as but
a little over two weeks intervene be-
fore all pictures must be in, seniors
are requested to arrange at once for
sittings, in order to avoid the conges-
tion and confusion usually incident to
the last day.
Lo,

Seniors and juniors in the engi-
neering college interested in the
school conducted for college men by
the Western Electric company, will
have an opportunity to learn the
details of the system at a meeting
to be held at 1:15 o'clock this
afternoon in room 311 of the engi-
neering building.
At this meeting, F. W. Willard, '06,
technical superintendent of the West-
ern Electric company, will outline
the employment system of his com-
pany and its plans for regular edu-
cational courses.
He will also tell of the special
summer training courses for juniors
which his. company has recently in-
stituted.
On Friday Mr. Willard will give
two lectures to students in chemical
engineering. The first will be at
9:00 o'clock in the morning in room
165 of the chemical building before
the class in building materials, and
will be on cable manufacture. The
second talk will be given to senior
chemical !ngineers, at 11:00 o'clock
in the morning in room 303 of the
chemical building. This talk will be
on rubber manufacture.
WANT MEN TO PLAY BRIDGE
Union Tournament in Need of Greater
Number of Entrants
The Union Bridge Tournament,
which begins Friday. night, has al-
ready aroused considerable interest
and over twenty names. have been put
upon the entrance sheet posted in the
Union. Although only a few less than
last year's registration, twenty play-
ers are not enough to carry on the
tournament as the committee would
like to have it, and so Russel B.
Stearns, '16L, who is in cifarge of the
arrangements, is again issuing the call
for players. Everyone who wishes to
play will have to sign up by Friday
since the games start that evening.
ENGLISH MINERS MAY STRIKE
Federaion Threatens Opposition to
Conscription
London, Jan. 12.-The most serious
move yet contemplated in opposition
to conscription was made today by the
Miners' Federation, the strongest
union in the United Kingdom, when
by a vote of two to one, it decided
to submit to a referendum of the
miners a resolution for a national
strike against the enforcement of the
military service bill. Such a strike
would mean the crippling of the
British fleet, munitions factories and
railways.
. Together with the news of this ac-
tion, came word that the Welsh Fed-
eration of Coal Miners by a vote of
162 to 83 had adopted a resolution to
walk out in case the military bill was
passed, and also it was said that a
resolution condemning conscriptionf
had been passed by South Wales coal
miners in Cardiff, 211 to 35.
QUADRANGLES INITIATE FOUR
Quartet of New Men Welcomed at
Meeting Last Night
-Quadrangles welcomed in a quartet
of new members at a meeting last
night. The new men include H. Mil-
ler, grad., Malcolm MacLean, '16; Wil
liam A. Pearl, '16, and Verne E. Bu
nett, '17.
Canadian Club Meets Tonight

The Canadian club, an organiza-
tion of all students of Canadian birth
or parentage, will hold a meeting at
the Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight.

Fifteen . Men Still Remain in
List With Many Ponies,
nea and Girls

The first cut of the 1916 Union Opera
tryouts, under the direction of Charles
G. Morgan, Jr., was made after the
rehearsal held at the Union last night.
More than 25 per cent were deducted
from the original number and some 65
men still remain on the list. Direc-
tor Morgan leaves Ann Arbor this
morning and will not return until Feb-
ruary 10, at which time the opera
work will begin.
The men who still remain in the
opera cast and chorus list are as
follows:

Cast

I

The official schedules of examina-
tions for the colleges of Literature,
Science and the Arts, of Engineering
and of Architecture, were given out by
Registrar Hall yesterday afternoon.
The examination period begins
Monday, January 31. In the literary
college the examinations will be
held from 9:00 to 12:00 o'clock and
from 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock. In the
colleges of Engineering and Architec-
ture they will be held from 8:00 to
12:00 o'clock and from 2:00 to 6:00
o'clock. The schedule is as follows:

DIRECTOR C. G. MORGAN LEAVES LISTS ARE NOW BEING PRINTED

Cast-F. W. Grover,
dee, '17; J. Palma, '18;
'17; Grant Cook, '17L;
'18; E. Sachs, '17; M
'17; Richard Hardy, '1
hon, '16; Leon Cunningh
Sikes, '16; Harry Carl
Kasberger, '18; Kemp
Hawkes, '17.

'18; Earl Par-I
F. J. Worster,
W. R. Atla6,
lorrison Wood,
7; Geo. MoMa-
ham, '17; Unase
son, '17; J. S.
Keena; E. E.

Monday-Wednesday classes: at 8,
first Saturday morning; at 9, second
Monday morning; at 10, first Monday
morning; at 11, first Tuesday morning;
at 1, second Monday afternoon; at 2
(and M. E. 2), first Wednesday after-
noon; at 3 (and C. E. 10), second Tues-
day morning.
Tuesday-Thursday classes: at 8,
first-Thursday afternoon; at 9, second
Wednesday morning; at 10, first Tues-
day afternoon; at 11, first Friday
morning; at 1 (and Shop 3), second
Tuesday afternoon; at 2, first Friday
afternoon; at 3 (and E. M. 2). first
Wednesday morning.

Ponies-W. G. Brownlee, '18; F. W.
Shafer, '18; Harold Loud, '18; H. P.
Nicholson, '18; Ralph Hicks. '16; B.
R. Clark, '18; Chas. Meyers, '18; E. F.
Walsch, "17; J. S. Burrows, '17E; N.
Robbins,-Jr., '18; L. C. Standt, '16; A.
D. Mott, '1.7E; C. F. Remington, W.
W. Slaght, '16E; E. Berry, '18E; B. R.
Penniman, '18; E. H. Falt, '18.,
Men--W. V. Casgrain, '18; H. T.
Kneeland. '18; Rex. St. Clair, '17; J.
H. Drake, '16; L. S. Shartel, '18; R. W.
Harbert, '17; L. G. Puchta, '17; J. W.
Childs, '18; L. B. Hadley, '17E; Wm.
Newton, '17; H. B. McCullom, '18; F.
H. Tinsman, '16; H. Bohling, '18; A. L.
Kirkpatrick, '18; H. Ingham, '18; 1H.
S. Hatch, '18; Eaton; R. H. Leslie,
'17; E. P. Smith, '17; E. K. Marshall,
'17E; Ray Gleichauf, '16; L Kinsey, Jr.
'16; B. T. Park, '16; Frank Willard,
'18; H. B. Bartholf, '16; C. V. Sn'ith,
'18; Harold Easley, '16; E. H. Heimann,
'18; J. Fischbach, '17; W. C. Ellet,
'18; Don Finkbeiner, '17L; C. K. Patter-
son; W. Hunt, '16; G. Murphy, '16; F.
W. Shafer, '18; Chas. P. Lowes, '16.
Girls-R. T. Perry, '18; C. H. Adams,
'18; S. W. Dubee, '16;j A. V. Living-
ston, '18E; F. C. Van Brunt, '18; C.
Fordney, '16E; N. S: Lowe, P. B. Ma-
her, '18; H. L. Goodspeed, '18; M. R.
Palin, '18; Ray Kocher, '18; Gord
Campbell, '17; C. Lyman, '18; A. H.
Maubaum, '18; D. W. Jennings, '16;
W. Nance, "17; R. N. Allan, '17L; A.
W. Bacon, '16; H. Pomper, '17L; H.
(Continued on Page Six}

I

Friday classes (and E. M. 3), sec-
ond Wednesday afternoon; Saturday
classes, second Thursday afternoon;
classes at 4 any day, second Thursday
morning; Drawing 4, 4a, 5, 5a, first
Thursday morning.
Irregular classes: first Monday aft-
ernoon, first Thursday morning, first
Saturday afternoon, second Wednes-
day afternoon, or second Thursday aft-
ernoon.
The examination schedules have
now gone to the press and will prob-
ably be ready for distribution next
week.
PLAN FOR WOMAN'S GARGOYLE

I

Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 12.---One stu-
f lent was killed and six others were
injured in the annual bowl fight to-
day between the freshman and sopho-
more classes of the University of
Pennsylvania. The fight was won by
the first year men.
The young man who lost his life
was William Liston, of Elizabeth, N.
J., a 17-year-old freshman. The most
seriously injured were Gordon Smyth,
who suffered concussion of the brain;
Arthur Essick, who sustained a sprain-
ed leg; and John Hill,, who received
lacerations. The others suffered fron
shock and exhaustion.
Immediately after the news of the
tragic ending of the bowl fight reach-
ed police headquarters a detail of the
murder squad was sent to the univer-
sity to arrest witnesses. They will
appear before the co-roner when the
inouest into Liston's death is held.
I The fight was one of the fiercest in
years and Liston's death was the first
fatality in the long list of fights since
1870.
There were 700 men in the struggle,
400 sophomores and 300 freshmen.
Issue New )Directory for Ann Arbor
A new directory for Ann Arbor and
Wshtenaw county has been issued
by R. L. Polk & Co. of Detroit. It
includes a complete list of the resi-
dences and business houses of Ann
Arbor, a street and avenue guide, a
list of the public and semi-pubih
buildings of the city and a classified
business directory of all persons do-
ing business in the county, arranged;
according to occupations and given
by towns. The edition is substantiallyi
bound and is gotten up in a creditable
fashion.
-BUSISSOF WAR
"Day of the Brass Band Past," Says+
Frederick Palmer in Talk
Last Night
SCORES NAVY UNPREPAREDNESS
"War is now the practical business
of killing. The age of the brass but-'
tons, the bugles and the military
bands is past. All the flag waving is
dead. Nobody, anymore, believes in
the glory of war; it is an efficient sys-
tem of plain slaughter. In my opin-
ion, this is the most encouraging sign
in the world for an ultimate peace
among all the nations of the world."
In expressing the above sentiments
last night in Hill auditorium before
an audience of about 3,500 people,
Frederick Palmer, noted war corre-
spondent, has brought to the United
States one of the most truly realistic
accounts of the great war now wag-
ing in Europe. In his address, Mr.
Palmer, who has spent the last year
at the French front as the only official
press correspondent of the United
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON]

Washington, Jan. 12.-The murder-
ing of 17 Americans by Mexican ban-
dits in territory controlled by Car-
ranza has apparently brought the
Mexican situation to a crisis.
Members of Congress who have re-
mained silent for the last two years
under the policy of watchful waiting
threw aside restraint today and de-
manded protection for American lives
and property. Senators admitted open-
ly on the floor that they favor inter-
vention if that is the only way in
which American citizens can be giveh
the protection to which they are en-
titled in Mexico.
Two resolutions were introduced,
one in the Senate calling for inter-
vention in the event of Carranza be-
ing unable to furnish adequate pro-
tection for citizens of the United
States, and the other in the House,
calling on the President to inform
Congress whether or not in his opin-
ion the time had come to discard
watchful waiting and take other steps
for the safeguarding of American lives
in Mexico. The President's Mexican
policy was bitterly attacked in the
Senate, being described by Senator
Borah as a "side-stepping, compromis-
ing, procrastinating, apologizing, un-
American policy."
Theradministration and "state de-
partment officials seemed bewildered
by the sudden turn in the Mexican
situation and were -anxious over the
effect of the incident upon' American
feeling toward the Carranza govern-
ment. Upon the receipt of the con-
summation of the massacre the state
department sent representations to
Carranza requiring him to order the
immediate pursuit, capture and pun-
ishment of the perpetrators of the
"dastardly crime" and strongly urging
better protection for foreigners in the
mining district of Chihuahua.
Secretary Lansing denied that the
state department had obtained safe
conduct for the Americans or had.is-
(Continued on Page Six)
TRYBUT TO BE HELD FR1
ALLNATONREVIEW STAFF
Property Men, Electrician, Costume
Manager and As sistants
Will Be Chosen

S1LUGHTER OF 1)
AMERI.CANS BRING
CON GRESSM TN ATTACK WILSON'
"WATCHIFUL WAITING"
POLICY
ADMINISTRATION BEWILDERE
State Department Sends Represent
tions to Carranza Ordering
C apture of Murderers

Jeni-ma Wenley Will Be Editor;
to Appear April 28

Issue

Plans for the woman's number of
the Gargoyle are well under way un-
der the direction of Jemima Wenley,
'16, managing editor for that issue.
The other members of the staff, thus
far chosen, are as follows: Art-
Marie Cornwell, '17; Margaret A. Cris-
well, '17; Ethel Hosmer, '17; Editor-

* - v -- - ial -Miriam Hubbard, '16, chief; Gla-
dys Whelan, '17. Additional members
SPRING PAGEANT PLANS '' -a:
P19NS of the editorial staff will be selected
SPRIS p9UNTwithin a few days. A representative
fnrmeach of the women's society
NOWlREIS CO PLTE hues on the campus, will work in
conjunction with the staff.
---- In addition to the material contrib-
Spectacle to le Given Under Auspices uted by the editors and their assis-
of Women's League; Prof. H. A. tants, contributions will be received
Kenyon Director gladly from any woman on the cam-
pus who has a taste for this sort of
Plans for the spring pageant to be work. All such are urged to com-
given under the auspices of the Wo- municate with Miss Wenley or Miss
men's League in Hill Auditorium on Hubbard at the earliest possible date.
April 28 are being completed rapidly. This issue will appear April 28.
The pageant is being given under the
direction of Prof. H.,A. Kenyon, of the In E SIIrn LETURESTODAY
Spanish department. The plans for r E ING LEbTUfES TUUAI
the scenario have been worked out ._
and dancing practice will begin soon. Chicago Daily News War Correspon-
A Shakespearean pageant will be, dent Will Talk in West Hall
given in honor of the great dramatist f

and poet. Because of the Shakes-
pearean character of this pageant,
support is being given the project by
the English literature, rhetoric and
oratory departments.
A first prize of $10, a second of two
pageant tickets and a third of one
ticket will be awarded to the men
handing in the best posters by a com-
mittee composed of Prof. H. R. Cross.
Prof. H. G. Kenyon and Mr. W. B.

Raymond E. Swing, Berlin war cor-
respondent of the Chicago Daily News,
will talk on modern methods of war
corresponding at 4:00 o'clock this
afternoon in room 202, West hall. An
invitation is extended to all those in-
terested in this work to attend.
Postpone Meeting in Regard to Corps
The meeting set for this evening in
regard to the artillery corps will not

The weather for Ann Arbor
einity-Colder with variable
possibly snow.

and vi-
winds,

General tryouts for the stage staff
of "La Revue des Nations" or Review
of the Nations, will be held at
3:00 o'clock Friday in room 302
University hall. An oppurtunity is af-
forded about 30 energetic men to com-
pete for places with this production,
which may take a trip on the road dur-
ing the spring vacation.
Property manager, stage carpenter,
electrician, costume manager and sev-
eral assistants for each department
will be selected. The most important
position is that of property man, be-
cause of the large scale upon which
"La Revue des Nations" is to be
staged. In addition to choosing men
for the above positions, the success-
ful candidates will be given a chance
to show their worth in helping plan
the scenic and lighting effects, which,
owing to the largeness of the produc-
tion, will be intricate.

TODAY
Faculty recital, Hill auditorium, at
4:15 o'clock.
Canadian Club meets at Union, at
7:30 o'clock.

Shaw.
March 1

The poster contest closes be held as no answer to the communi-
.cations sent out has been received.

TOMORROW
Students' recital, School
1 4:15 o'clock.

of Music,'

.

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND

Meetings
'Ilb irs.- ,.00) P. )M.
8.00 IP. M.
Fri.-4 :0%0P. 31.
8:00 P. il.
Sad,-10 :00 P. MIf.
12:00, Noon
Luncheon.

:

2nd

Annual Vocational Conference
F OR WO ME N

Speakers:

(Includes)
flov. Ferris
FtiCI Barnes
Mary Snow
Jesse Davis
DW. Hayden
Dr. Glover

SARAH'CASWEL'L A'N.GELL HALL

0

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