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January 11, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-11

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THE DAILY

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VOL. XXVI. No. 72.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1916.

ASQUITH PRAISES
BRITISH RETREAT
FROM GAL0LIPOL
SAYS SUCCESSFUL WITHDRAWAL,
DESERVES HIGH PLACE
IN HISTORY
RELEASES 200,000 TURKS

Old Mlanuscripts ~N
Long Kept Intact NEWltNION OPERA
Original La nd Grit, Signed by JamesT ARR
r'e,~ 1)eedlng landF to 'hun
wriny om Va uh EEFORDY

PRICE FIVE CENTS
ENGLISH ARMIES
IN MESOPOTAMIA
REPORTED LOST
TUREiS (LAl JO hAVE ENTIRE
BRIT1Sh FORCJ' SURROUND.
El IT KU-LAMATA
RELIEF CONINGENT IN DANGER

Stro,igest Corps of Turkish Army
Sow Available for Use Else-
it here, Says Report

Is

London, Jan. 10.-Premier Asquith,
in announcing the withdrawal of the
last British troops from the Dar-
danelles at Sedd-el-bahr, to the
house of commons this afternoon, re-
ferred to the operations together with
those by which the withdrawal at
Anzac and Suvla was accomplished as
deserving of an impressive place in
English history.
The house will learn with extreme
gratification," he said, "of the retire-
ment of the force at Cape Helles, 'at
the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula' with-
out the loss of a single life.
English Loss Negligible
"Of 11 guns left behind 10 were
worn-out 15-pounders which were ren-
dered unfit for further service before
they were abandoned. All stores of
reserve ammunition which could not
be removed were set afire before re-
tirement. The whole retirement was
conducted with minimum loss. These.
operations, taken in conjunction with
the earlier one at Suvla and Anzac
are, I believe, without parallel in mili-
tary or naval history.
"That they should have been carried
out without any loss considering the
vast number of persons and amount
of materials involved is an achieve-
ment of which all concerned-the com-
(Continued on Page Six)
STUDEINTS TO GIVE
SPAi Y JANUAR 2
Oratorical Association Actors Will Ap-
pear in "Servant in the
House"
PROF. HOLLISTER DIRECTS WORK

Interesting record; containing the
act of the govern]-- and the judges
of the territory of Michigan in estab-
lishing a urniversity, and dated April
13, 1821, were found last week in the
university vault where they were
placed by direction of H-on. I. ".
Walker.
At a recent nieting of the regents,
the manuscript proceedings of the re-
gents from 1537, t') the present time,
were ordered printed. At the time this
printing was ordered, the existence of
these earlier records was 'entirely un-
known, and it is tiought that when
the whole is published, including those
found last week, the records will be
complete.
Among the documents found is a
land grant, dated May 15, 1824, and
signed by James Monroe, deeding cer-
tain lands to the University. It is
probable that this will be photo-
graphed and framed, after whch it
will be placed in the reading room of
the general library.'
No Fatalities In
Dupont Explosion
Philadelphia, Ja., Jan. 10.-An ex-
plosion in the Hadley yards of the
Prismatic Powder company, a branch
of the Dupont company, shook the en-
tire city shortly before 5 o'clock this
afternoon. It is reported that no one
was killed.
This followed two explosions in the
Carney's Point branch of the Dupont
company early this morning in which
three men were killed. Reports that
arrests had been made in connection
with the Carney's Point plant were{
denied. _
Dorm Has Party
For Pres. Angell
Sunday evening at 5:30 o'clock the
first fire was lighted at the Martha
Cook Building, President-Emeritus
James B. Angell touching the taper toj
the kindling.
About twenty members of the fac-
ulty and their wives were the guests
of the building at a dainty supper

Cl tSAF. 1'. flOR(cAN TO lBE IN WORK
OF SELECTING CAST Ad1
CHORUS AT O'NCE
CHORUS TRYOUT DRAWS 120
'rosi. limlball, lorch and Mr. 'a-
kielski of Architectural Depart-
nimnt it yJudge Posters
Charles F. Morgan, Jr., of Phila-
cielphia, dire'ctor of the 1916 Michigan
Union Opera, will arrive in Ann Ar-
bor this morning for a four days' vis-
it, during which time he will take
charge of the weeding-out process of
the cast and chorus tryouts. Morgan
comes directly from New Haven,
where he has been directing a the-
atrical production.
The new director comes to Ann Ar-
bor 'with a host of recommendations
and a list of successfully directed
plays that assure the entire campus
that this year's opera will be one of
the best that has ever been given.
Morgan's latest successes are the
"Rosemaid," "All forathe Ladies'"
with Sam Bernard, and ":Princess
Pat," which has been running in New
York for the last six months.
Yiauy Appear at Tryout
The chorus tryouts held at the Un-
ion last night dre-w out a crowd of
more than 120 men. The names of the
successful candidates will be posted
in the Union today. Owing to the
large number of men out, the judging
.committee was unable to try the
men's voices, and another tryout will
be held in the near future.
The judges for the poster contest
are as follows: Professors S. F. Kim-
ball and E. Lorch and Mr. L. A. Ma-
kielski of the architectural depart-
ment. The decision of the poster
judging committee will be announced
in a week or so.
CERCLE FRANCAIS INITIATES
Twelve Are Received by Organization
With Novel Ceremony

Official Otto"1ai Statement
.Main British 1'osition
Is Penetrated

Says

FLOY D
Students Who

L. YOUNG, '16L
F"igured as Principals
Korn Lost

HAROLD F. MORN, '17L
in Friday's Itiver Tragedy, is Which
His Life.

Hold Memorial Services For
Victim Of Skating Tragedy
Memorial services were held Sun- byterian church.
day afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the The body of Korn, which was a&
Phi Alpha Delta fraternity for Harold companied by W. C. Mullendore, '16L,
F. Korn, '17L, who was drowned last a fraternity brother of the deceased,
Friday night while skating on the reached Glenwood Springs, Colo., at

I-Inron river.
The ceremony, the attendance at
which was limited- to members of the
fraternity, was conducted by Rev.
L. A. Barrett, assisted by Rev. R. W.
Hamilton, student pastor, of the Pres-

10:10 o'clock last night.
Floyd L. Young, '16L, who garrow-
ly escaped the same fate of Korn in
a fruitless attempt to rescue his com-
panion, yesterday had so far recov-
ered 'from the shock of his exposure,
that he was able to attend his classes.

London, Jan. 10. -An official report
given out by the British war office to-
day makes the first official admission
that the British army in Mesopotamia
which was driven back from the ap-
proaches to Bagdad and took up a
stand at Kut-el-Amara, is in desper-
ate straits.
The report says that a large relief
force moving up the Tigris from the
base at Bazra has been in contact wtih
a Turkish army at a point about 50
miles below Kut-el-Amara:
Turks Report Victory
A semi-official Turkish statement is-
sued today corroborates this state-
ment reporting the defeat, of a
British relief force at Sheiksaid. This
relief force, the Constantinople state-
ment says, started out from lami-ali
gharbison the Tigris about 50 miles
south of Kut-el-Amara.
Other Turkish advices quoted by the
Berlin Overseas news agency today
assert that the entire British army at
Kut-el-Amara is now surrounded by
the Turks.
Of the total, which is estimated at
45,000, Constantinople and Berlin de-
clare that 10,000 have been left for
the defense of Kut-el-Amara, while
the remainder is in retreat southward
(Continued on Page Six)
SUBSCR IBE TODAY
FOR0'YEAR BOOK'
Michiganensian Orders TPaken Today
by Stafi *embers; Tables to Be
Placed About Campus
WILL ISSUE 1,000 COPIES ONLY

FREDERICK PALMER MOST
FA OUS' OFIAIR WRITERS
Was With Dewey in Philippines; Wrote
of Russo-Jap War, Turkish Revolu-
tion and Balkan 'Troubles.
Frederick Palmer, who comes to
lecture on "My Year of the World
War" in Hill Auditorium next Wed-
nesday night, has probably seen more
modern warfare than any other Amer-
ican writer.
As war correspondent he went
around the world with Admiral Dew-
ey, saw service in the Philippines,
was with the expedition that went to
the relief of Pekin, represented "Col-
lier's Weekly" and the London Times
in the war between Russia and Ja-
pan, sailed around the world with the
American battleship fleet, and went
through the Turkish revolution and
the Balkan war of 1912.
In Mexico When War Started
When Yankee guns thundered at
Vera Cruz a year ago last summer,

Charles Rann Kennedy's great play - t A h a
"Th Sevan i th Hose" wll e erved later. A birthday cake on
"Thie Servant in the House," will be which blazed eighty-seven candles
given by University students under the was brought in, honoring Dr. Angell
auspices of the Oratorical Association whose birthday was on the seventh of
on January 27. his month.
This is perhaps the best and most
modern play that has ever been un- A portrait of Dr. Angell hangs above
dertaken by that organization. The the mantle and it is to be known in
fact that the play proved so popular the future as the Angell Fire-place.
in the eastern dramatic circles, and
also drew large crowds while playing Lusitana Fight
in New York makes the production all
the more attractive. W ill So n BeOv
The theme of the play is based on
the much-heralded topic of brother-
hood, and as one critic has said, it German Foreign Office to Agee to a
successfully portrays "the hunger for Conference Within a Few Days
brotherhood which is at the bottom of
the unrest of the modern civilized W .F
world." The scene takes place in an
4ilish country vicarage, amid clas- tiement of the Lusitania controversy
sical and religious surroundings. The probably will be reached before the
play is divided into five acts, setting d of the present week. All that
forth the story of a orning in early remains is for the Berlin foreign of-
pr syfice to approve a tentative under-
The roles in the play are taken by standing reached today at a confer-
student who have either made a long ence before Secretary of State Lan-
study of dramatics or have already sing and Count von Bernstorff, the
taket part in numerous plays here and German Ambassador.
elsewhere. Those who are in the That this approval will be given
cast are as follows: E. M. Wisdom, and that the demand itself will be
grad.; M. S. MacLean, '16, Lucile Pry- embodied in a formal note from Ger-
er, '16, Leila Pike, '16, George D. Wild- many to the Unlited States was conli-
7er, '17, H. H. Springstun, '17, and N. dently predicted tonight in state de-
E. Pinney, '16. :artrment circles, and in quarters close
The play is under the direction of to the German embassy. The note, it
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the oratory is said, will take the form of a reply
department, assisted by Mr. Louis to the American note to Germany of
Eich, also of the oratory department. July 21, 1915.

Twelve new members were initiated
into the Cercle Francais last night at
the meeting of that society, held in the
Cercle rooms in University hall. The
initiation was one of the most unique
that the society has yet had. The new
members were welcomed into the
Cercle by Mr. Harry V. Wann, its di-
rector, and by James E. Chenot, '16,
its president. Charles J. Frisbie, '16
was maitre des ceremonies for the
event. The names of the new mem-

J -HOP TICKETS TO BE
PLACED ON Sil MONDAY
Limit Distribution to Juniors for First
Three Days of
Week
3-Hop tickets will be placed on se
at the Union net Monday, according
to a decision of the committee at a
meeting held Sunday afternoon. The
sale will be limited to juniors on Mon-
day, Tuesday and Wednesday, after
which it will be thrown open to all
students.
Each man will be permitted to buy
only one ticket, and at least 12 of the
pasteboards must be shown by repre-
sentatives of fraternities or house
clubs who desire to purchase booth
tickets.
The Hop program is to include about
35 dances, and the grand march will
start at 9:15 o'clock. The orchestra
will play extras from 9:00 to 9:15
o'clock. Programs will be distributed
at the door._
IWHAT'S GOING ON
The weather for Ann Arbor and vi-
cinity for Tuesday: Light snow flur-
ries and colder; westerly winds.

bers who were initiated last night he was on the firing line, and as soon
follow: Mary Walsh, '16, Muriel Ty- as the trouble was over he had no
son, '16, Adaline McAllister, '17, Marie more than returned to America when
Cornwell, '17, Margaret Eness, '18, the Great War broke out in Europe.
Katherine Doherty, '18, Margaret Kerr, Word reached him in New York to
'18, Paulene Champlin, '18, Tom C. move at once to the front, and ac-
Reid, '17, Harold Humphreys, '16, C. companied by Mrs. Palmer, he sailed
Vernon Sellers, '17, and Yancy Alt- for Europe on the ill-fated Lusitania.
sheler, '17. He is in America now on a furlough.
which he is spending in delivering
WORTH CASE CROPS UP; lectures, and will return again with-
PLAINTIFF MUST GIVE BOND in a few weeks to the battle front.
Seats will be on sale at Wahr's to-
A bill of particulars and an argu- day from 11:00 to 12:00 A. M., and
ment for security of costs was made from 4:00 to 6:00 P. M. General ad-
in the case of Clarence Worth, '15E, mission is 25 cents, with a few re-
against Chief of Police Frank Pardon, served seats at 50 cents.

Subscription sale for the Michigan-
ensian will begin today by the use of
tables placed at various points on the
campus.
One table will be found in the corri-
dor of University Hall, a second at
the entrance to the General Library,
and a third, which will be located, in
the Engineering Building today, will
be moved consecutively during the re-
maining days of the week.to the Law,
Medical and Dental buildings.
SThe Michiganensian staff empha-
sizes the fact that the issue as now
planned is limited to 1,000 copies, and
that no addition to this number can
be secured after January. It will
be necessary, therefore, in order for
students to avoid disappointment later
in the year, that all'those desiring
books hand in their subscriptions
sometime this week.
As already announced, the new plan
provides for a deposit of 50 cents at
the time of subscribing, the balance,
$2.00, to be paid when the book is de-
livered in the spring. The place of
delivery in the spring will be an-
nounced later. If, by chance, there
sbvuld be any spare copies unsub-
scribed for, they will be disposed of
at that time at.$3.00 each.

TODAY
Cercle Francais lecture,
Hall, 5:00 o'clock.

Tappan

yesterday morning in the circuit
court. The plaintiff was ordered to
furnish a bond of $100 for security
and the motion for a further bill of
particulars was denied.
Worth was arrested on the night of
October 14, 1915, in the so-called Ma-
jestic riot. He was brought before
Justice Doty, demanded a jury trial
and was acquitted. He immediately
brought suit for damages of $10,000
on an allegation of false detention
and imprisonment.

DEAN VAUGHAN GOES TO NEW
YORK; GIVES IERTER LECTURES
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the Med-
ical school, left last Friday for Newf
York City, where he is now deliver-
ing a series of five lectures, called the
Herter lectures, at the University and
Belleview Medical school. He will re-
turn next Sunday. In his absence,
Dr. Herbert W. Emerson, '15M, is in
charge of Dean Vaughan's classes.

Meeting track candidates, West lec-
ture -room, Physics building, 7:00
o'clock.
Choral Union rehearsal, University
School of Music, 7:00 o'clock.
Michigan Technic staff smoker, En-
gineering society rooms, 7:00 o'clock.,
Junior lit basketball tryouts meet
at 7:30 o'clock, trophy room, Water-
man gymnasium.
TOMORROW
Frederick Palmer on the "World
War," Hill Auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Meeting of Prescott Club, Room 303,
Chemistry building, 7:30 o'clock.
Saginaw students meet to organ-
ize. Union, 7:30.

i

SUBSCRIBE FOR YOVR.

IC IGA

E

SI

TERMS:-50c deposit. Balance of $2.00 at time of delivery.
No extra books will be ordered after this week.
You save 50c--you make sure of your copy.

TODY

Tables will be placed in the General Library, University Hall.
Also on-' table will be shifted asiollows:
TUESDAY-Engineering Bldg. THURSDAY-Medical Bldg.
WEDNESDAY-Law Bldg. FRID4Y Dental Bldg.

p

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