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January 08, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-08

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THE DAILY
$1E50
NEWllS OF THlE WORLI) AND
T1111,'CAMPUS

The

Michigan

Daily

Phones :--Editorial 2414
Business80
TELEGRAPH SERVICEBBy 'THE
NEW YORK SUN

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-. rr~~~-- ----------.----. ---- -- ~ --- - -- -

VOL. XXVI, NO. 71,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 1916.

PRICE FIVE C

PLANS COMPLETED
FOR BIG VARSITY,
TRACK MEETING!

B N 'R LM E, .FA I GRELL, ROwE M ' I l ,IIS E K R

ANI)
1O,

FRESHMEN URGED 10 ATTEND
.'1 e l Work for Candidates Corn-
wences Tom orrow Afternoon
for First Time
Preparations for the big Varsity
track meeting which will be held Tues-'
day evenig at 7:00 for all men in-
terested in the spaing sport have been
complete(l. Four speakers have been
selected for the occasion, and they will
endeavor to arouse the enthusiasm of
the men present in several phases of
track work.
Philip G. Bartelme, athletic director,
will outline the work for the season.
and in addition will give the men an
idea of what meets may be expected
to be held for the Varsity athletes.
Coach "Steve" Farrell will tell the
men something of track here and else-
where, and the existing conditions.
while Intramural Director Rowe will
be on hand to advise candidates of the
importance of interclass track teams
as .an asset to future Michigan Var-
sities. The last speaker will be Cap-
tlin "Hal" Smith. "Hal" will inform'
those present of the importance of a
large list of aspirants in each depart-
ment of the sport, as with the few real
stars which this year's team is ex-
pected to produce it will be necessary
that a big field be entered in each
event if Michigan hopes to finish as
her supporters figure she should finish.
Freshmen are invited to attend this
meeting, as it is in no way restricted
to those who are trying out for Var-
sity positions this season. It is
hoped that, inasmuch as the freshmen
have not as yet shown any stars in
(Continued on Page Six)
10O QUELL STRIKE
i iiSines s Section Totally Destroyed;
houses Burned and Looted by
Frenzied Strikers

Gargoyle Military
Number Out Soon
Under a suggestive color scheme of
red and black, the Military Training
number of the Gargoyle will make its
appearancet on the campus January
21. P1reparations have been completed
which will go far toward making this
issue one of the snappiest of the
year. The cover design is a two-color
drawing by D. T. Hoffman, '19M, and
will show--well, wait and see.
A double page drawing showing the
campus as it will appear under the
bustle and stir of military life has
been prepared by Harry Leach, 16E.
Many other .special features will por-
tray military training in its relation
to M~fichigan's campus, the purpose
being to enliven this much-discussed
topic, and bring up some aspects of
the subject which may have been
omitted from the more serious dis-
cussions appearing of late. Plans
have been made for an issue of 1200
copies and it is anticipated that this
number will no more than supply the
demand.
Raiser's Iealth ileported Improved
Rome, Jan. 3.-Optimistic news re-
garding the kaiser's health reached
the Vatican from Switzerland today.
These reports said that the emperor
was still feverish and was kept in-
doors as a precautionary measure, but
was attending to business of state, es-
pecially in connection with the prep-
aration for a war council to be held
at Berlin at the end of the month.
SPEAKS AT UNION
Noted College Lecturer and Railway
Engineer to Repeat Popular
Address Today
WILL TA &Li AT "Y" MEETING
Willard Beahan, of Cleveland, Ohio,
well known lecturer, will speak at the
Union. meeting at 3:00 o'clock this
afternoon on the same subject that he
presented in Ann Arbor last year.,
"Watchman, Tell Us of the Night."
Mr. Beahan is also scheduled to
speak on "The New Beatitude" at the
"Y" meeting to be held in the Arcade
theater this evening at 6:30 o'clock.
The speaker is not only recognized
as a leading college lecturer but as!
one of the foremost railway engineers

SENIOR LAW TAKE S
BODY OF KORN TO
PARENTS_*IN WEST
LOSS OF THEIR FELLOW MEMBER
TIIROWS GLOOM OVER
FRATERNITY
SERVICES HEL AT FRATERNITY'

D)row ned
by1

Man's Companion Uninjured
Long Struggle in Icy
Waters of River

:1'
>F
>:
ti

*** *t * * * * *
Partial List of the Death Toll
of the Huron River in bRe-
cent Years
Leslie Butterfield, grad, May 2,
1912.
John Henry Bacon, '15, March
30, 1913, canoeing.
Archibald J. Crandall, '16,
March 30, 1913, canoeing.
Ella Rysdorp, '15, March 30,
1913, canoeing.
Paul Sampson, '14, May 17, 1913,
canoeing.
Irving -Al. Fennell, summer ses-
sion, July 3, 1915.
Harold F. Korn, '17L, January 7,
191(, skating.
* **** * *

Y(OUNVSTiWN SUE NE OF RlOTIN
East Youngstown, Ohio, Jan 8.-
With 2,000 zcldicrs patrolling the
streCts tonight; after a session of
rioting and conflagration during
which the business section was re-
dured to ruiis and hundreds of houses
devoured by flames, quiet and order
atain prevail.
The tell of the mob violence will
exceeJ $i,500,000, with but slight
hope of retrieving the loss by insur-
ance as the policies carry riot
clauses in them. Business men yes-
terday l:ossssed of means today find
themelves penniless.
Had heavy guns directed their bom-
bardment against buildings in the
ddwntown section, the damage could
not have been any more appalling.
aorrh is now being made for looters,
n2 :ouse~ te Pouse hunt resulted in
1 ~ worth If pl ude being recov-
er. More than ,1 men at whose
sthe stolen goodr were recov-
S e in jail. very effort will be
_ oleaders of the mob
t in the rioting which
w th~be sabjee of a grand jury in-
d Stbtws pus a i authorities are
p de tumorrouw to conduct an
i mi the burning of a.
I)2c tO'e b.ilidieg. S~-veral thousands
we oad out t striing workers
!.s a ernon, todaky being regular
ay day'. lPaymast er with thousands
f pa. lhoks- we~re - atoned in open
1wts nr the pieant and the workmen
id up and retived their money.
V b demied b' elieials of they
deel company1~ the are indications
hat raations ar-e being made to
U imort srike freakrs. hundreds of
cots wx e bro<ught lnte the mill in a
ial trae, while din,g rooms were
h, td up in diffeint hiOps.

Accompanied by W. C. Mullendore,1
'16L, the body of Harold F. Korn, '17L,1
who Friday night lost his life throughf
drowning while skating on the Huron
river, yesterday was shipped on thel
1:17 afternoon train for Glenwood
Springs, Colo., where sorrowing par-
ents await the arrival of the body of
their son.
The tragedy has cast a pall of gloom
over the members of the Phi Alphat
Delta fraternity, of which Korn was
a member, and this afternoon simple
and private memorial services will bel
held at the fraternity house on Hill
street. Rev. R. W. Hamilton, student
pastor of the Presbyterian church, will
officiate at the services.
Fraternity brothers of the dead
youth have kept in touch with his
parents by telegraph and have notified
them of the time the body will reach
Glenwood Springs.
Floyd L. Young, '16L, who almostĀ°
lost his life in an heroic attempt to
rescue his companion, has recovered
from the shock of his hazardous ex-
perience, and is doing nicely. Dr.
H1. H. Cummings, of the university
health service, who is attending Young,
stated that owing to Young's splen-
did physique no danger of complica-
tions through pneumonia need be ex-
nected. This is remarkable when the
length of time that Young was in ther
frigid waters of the Huron is taken
into consideration.
WILL HOLD CHORUS TRYOUTS
Opera Needs at Least 30 Men to Fill
Chorus Parts
Opera chorus tryouts will be staged
in the Michigan Union at 7:00 o'clock
tomorrow night, and from the number
of places to be filled on this year's
opera it is expected that a large num-
ber of students will be on hand. At
least 30 chorus parts will be needed.
The students trying out will be
judged principally on their singing
and dancing ability, and those who so
wish can arrange to have their danc-.
ing partners selected beforehand so
as to facilitate matters.
The new director, Mr. Charles P.
Morgan, Jr., will arrive in Ann Arbor
some time Tuesday, and the weeding-
out process will undoubtedly begin on
Tuesday night. The men trying out
for cast parts will be expected to be
ready to give their respective parts
any time next week.

Colored Artists ToI
Play For1916 Hop1
Shook's Colored Orchestra, of De-
troit, and Russo's Third Regimental
Band, of Saginaw, will furnish the
music at the J-Hop, according to con-
tracts signed yesterday by represen-
tatives of the Hop committee.
Shook's aggregation of black mu-
sicians will make a specialty of the
use of stringed instruments, while the
feature of Russo's band will be brass
music. It is planned to have the bandP
strike up "The Victors" for the grand
march and also play the selection for
the first dance, The orchestra and
band will then alternate, each playing
for every other dance during the 30t
on the program. ng
The contract for decorating thea
gym has been signed with the Hunting
House Co. of Detroit. A solid roof
of decorations is to be hung a littlei
above the level of the running track,t
with a dormer woindow effect at thet
point where the musicians are to be
located. The booths will be separatedr
by' overhead lattice work and imita-
tion lamp posts, strung with paper
vines.-
A meeting of the Hop committeet
will be held at the Union at 3:00c
o'clock this afternoon.E
To Give Fischer Party at Union, Fridayt
Arrangements have been completedi
for the Fischer party to be held at thei
Michigan Union, Friday evening, Jan.
14. The music as usual will be fur-~
nished by Fischer's full first orchestrat
from Kalamazoo. Announcement hast
been made that tickets may be had by1
calling, either 236 or 370.
Fossil Collection Given to. University
Mr. F. M. Fillers, instructor in the
department of geology, has presented
the University with a valuable col-
lection of fossils of Miocene taken
xtrom the vicinity of Yorktown, Mary-
land.
"ALLNATION REVE"
HNDLED BY EXPERT
g I i
First Rehearsal of Production Given
on Jan. 17, Say Committee 7
in Charge
WILL BE IERALDED BY SIGN
Production of "The All-Nation Re-
vue" will be in the hands of a pro
fessional brought from New York or
Detroit, according to the plans of the
committee in charge of this cosmopoli-
tan spectacle. The producer is to ar-
rive in time for the first general re-
hearsal on Monday, January 17.
During the holidays considerable
competition arose among the students
in charge of the various acts as to
which would be the most advanced at
this rehearsal. The result is that
many scenes are well on their way
to perfection. Upon the producer will
fall the duty of combining the repre-
sentations of the various countries and
of insuring the correct interpretation
of the iational spirit of the land to be
depicted.
An electric sign, 10 by 20 feet, the
first of its kind to herald an under-
graduate undertaking, will make its
appearance above North State street

in the near future. It is to be placed
on the top of some building and will
remain in the view of all until the day
of the production, March 7.
Work upon the scenario, under the
direction of Professor J. R. Brumm, is
progressing. This part of the produc-
tion faces the peculiar difficulty of
binding together into a coherent whole
the representations of the many dif-
ferent lands which are to find their
places upon the list.

MICHIGANENSIAN TO BE
PLCED UPON REGULA
*SUBSCRIPTION BAIS
Week of January 10-15 to Be Set Aside
for Taking of Orders for
Annual Book
SUBSCRIBERS THIS WEEK GET
BOOK AT A COST OF i$250
NO EXTRA ORDERS TO BE MADE
AFTER JANUARY 12, AS
BY CONTRACT
By a recent action of the Board in
Control of Students' Publications the
Michiganensian has been placed upon
a subscription basis. This action was
taken to secure for the management
of the Michiganensian the opportun-
ity of knowing just how .many books
to order. Last year the demand for
the Michiganensian far exceeded the
supply and the circulation of the an-~
nual has been very fluctuating for the
last few years.
The week of January 10-15 has been
set aside for the taking of subscrip- -
tions. The price of the Michiganen-i
sian will be $2.50 for those who sub-i
scribe for it during that week. A de-i
posit of fifty cents is to be made at1
the time of subscribing, the balance of:
two dollars to be paid when the bookl
is delivered in the spring. The print-
ing contract of the Michiganensian
calls for 1,000 copies of the book and
if these are not all subscribed for now+
the balance will be placed on sale in
the spring at the price of $3.00. Thus
by subscribing now a saving of fifty
(Continued on Page Six)
GERMANYMAES NEW
CO0N CEIS S ION TO0 .S.
Assures She Will Not Turn Crews of
Vessels With Contraband Adrift
in Small Boats
Washington, Jan. 8.-Germany has'
made another substantial concession
to the United States on the submarine
issue. Following her assurances yes-
terday that she would adhere strictly
to the principles of international law
in her submarine operations in the
Mediterranean, the Berlin government
has now met another objection raised
by the United States.
.Germany's new concession consists
in assurances that she will not turn
adrift in small boats on the high sea
the crew and passengers of American
vessels, which are to be torpedoes for
carrying absolute contraband. Ger-
many agrees with the contention of the
United States that such treatment of
passengers and crew does not satisfy
the demand of international law that
they shall be "placed in safety."
While Germany's new pledge applies
only to American vessels, the query of
this government, having covered only
such ships as the principle involved,
it is believed, will have a much wider
application, including enemy liners.
Germany -already has pledged herself
not to sink liners in the war zone
without warning and without . safe-
guarding the lives of passengers and
crew. Having defined in the case of
American vessels what she regards as
safesguarding lives" it is argued it
will be difficult for her to apply a dif-
ferent set of principles in the case
of enemy ships.

RUSSIANSRESUME
OFFESIVE IN THE Ā£
AUSTRIANS BEING RELD BY TER-
RIFIC ONSLAUGHT OF
RUSSIAN FORCES
RUSSIAN SUCCESS POSSIBLE
Germans Heavily Repulsed in Their
Attempts to Break Through
Alsatian Lines
London, Jan. 8.---The Vienna war of-
fice, admits that the Russians have re-
sumed the offensive on a great hill on
the Bukowina frontier and in Galicia,
backed by thousands of heavy guns.
Both Vienna and Petrograd report
fighting of great intensity on a 20-mile
front along the bend of the Styr.
The Russians insist that they have
taken Czartorysk, which the Austrians
contradict. Both sides agree that the
Russians are pounding at the Austrian
line 50 miles east of Kovel, the imme-
diate objective on the Volhynian of-
fensive. If this railway town can be
taken by the Slavs, they will threaten
seriously the Austrian line in all this
section. For that reason the possi-
bilities of a Russian success here are
regarded as greater than at other
points on the line.
Both the Lufzk and Dubni fortresses
would be cut off from supplies by the
taking of Kovel and the envelopment
of the Germans in the Dvinsk region
would be threatened.
Enormous numbers are engaged in
the Bukowina fighting, as there are
probably as many as 800,000 engaged,
and perhaps 10,000 guns. Casualties
are also reported to be on the same ti-
tanic scale. The Russian chances for
success seem excellent, not only strat-
egically, but also from the fact that
just before the war there was consid-
erable agitation in the Reichsrath for
the ceding of; Bukowina to Russia.
Norwegian Ship Submarined
London, Jan. 8.--The Norwegian
steamer Bonheur of 1158 tons has been
sunk by a submarine. Fifteen of the
crew were rescued and landed, it was
learned today.
French Commissions in Tunis Attacked
Berlin (via wireless), Jan. 8. -
Bloody riots have broken out in Tunis
where natives chased recruiting com-
missions and assassinated one major
and the president of one commission,
according to reports through the Ital-
ian paper Secolo.
Germans Repulsed in Alsace Attacks
Paris, Jan. 8.-The Germans inale
an attack to break through the French
line between the Renzelsen and the
Hirzstein at the Herzmannsweilenkopf
in Alsace last night. They were -re-
pulsed except at one point where they
gained a foothold in a small section of
the French trenches, but were driven
out of this position this morning.
German Zeppelin Wrecked by Gale
Amsterdam, Jan. 8.-A German Zep-
pelin was wrecked while descending
in a heavy gale near Namur, Belgium,
according to advices received here to-
day. Two of the crew were killed.
The pilot was arrested. The airship
wasnot totally destroyed and will be
rebuilt.
CHINA'S RULER SERIOUSLY ILL
Yuan Shi Kai Suffers Severe Stroke
iof ApfinIevy

WILLAIt) WEIIAN.,
Nc-ted Engineer, Who Speaks at the
I'uaiei at 3:434) o'Clock this afternoon
amtl at the "Y" meetigm- in the Arcade
Theatre at 6:30 o'Clock.-
in the country. He is well-known in
Ann Arbor in both capacities. i
Besides being intimately acquainted
with Dean Mortimer E. Cooley and
Professor H. E. Riggs of the engineer-
ing college, he has a host of friends
on the campus.
In addition to his official duties with
the L. S. and M. S. railroad, Mr. Bea-
han is a regular lecturer at Cornell,
Purdue, Illinois and Pennsylvania uni-
versities. He has talked at Michigan
frequently during the past seven
years.
As a preliminary to the meeting to
be held this evening, under the aus-
pices of the Y. M. C. A., free moving
pictures will be shown at the Arcade
theater, starting at 6:10 o'clock.
Mr. A. C. Sawhill, one of the best
soloists in Ann Arbor, will sing at
the meeting in the Arcade theatre to-
night. He will be accompanied on
the piano by Claire Lyman, '19

1!

-j

WHA 'S G ING NTokio, Jan. B.--Yuan Shi Kai, re-
cently appointed to the throne of
-rAChina, has suffered a stroke of apo-
Weather Forecast for Ann Arbor -lx an oa si a- r eiu
and~~~ viiiy-Farwt lxy anndayis ina a ery serious
condition. Yuan, after having served
wids; generally warmer. approximately three years as presi-
TODAY dent ot the nw o-hentea republic, was
C. R. Brown speaks, Methodist cowvned he, in the early Part of
church, 7:30 o'clock. Iaat ,eenber.
W. Beahan speaks, Arcade theatre,' The king wa born 57 years ago, an
6:10 o'clock. sucedl i in rising through most j
Menorah Society meets, Newberry
hall, 8:00 o'clock. ed th revolutiosts in 2.
Busrah campaign meeting, Mc-
Ian Hall, 4:30 o'clock. Prolit Harden PuilNinu Article
J-Hop committee meets, Union, '
o'clock. Ber in . via Aiserdau, Jan. -
- W. Beahan speaks, Sunday tnron Vaxle-jian Narden the Ghrman Jour-
meeting, 3:00 o'clock. n=i, ( is prohibiting ,oi publishing
TOMORROW speecins or wruings for the remai-
Cercle Francais meets, Cercle roo ,r of he ar be an order issued
8:30 o'clock. mav. His wekly magazine has been
Tryouts for Union Opera Choi upprsed for attacking the govern-
Union, 7:00 o'clock. mem.

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Charles Reynolds Brown
Dean.of the School .f Religion of Yale University
SUBJECT:
THE TRU EA0UR OFU LuIFET, 0
TO-NIGHT Mehds h hTO-NIGHT
at 7:3.0 ehdstCc .t 7:3.0

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