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January 08, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-08

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THE DAILY
$1.50I
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

The

Michigan

Daily

PL ones :--Editorial 2414
Business 960
TE LEGR APH SERsICs 6BTHE
NEW YORK SUN

I:

VOL. XXVI. No. 70.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 8, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

HURON

:LAIMS

KOItN,

'17L

s

GERMVANS ASSUJRE
RESPECT OF LAW
IN U-BOAT CASE
NOTE TO SECRETARY LANSING
PLEDGES REPARATION
FOR LOSSES
PERSIA CASE CAUSE OF STEP
Memoradum Indicates That Subma-
rine of Kaiser May Have
Sunk Liner
Washington, Jan. 7.-Germany on
her own initiative, has given formal
assurances to the United States that
her submarine activities in the Medit-
erranean will be conducted strictly in
accordance with international law.
Count von Bernstorff, the German am-
bassador, today delivered to 'Secre-
tary Lansing a memorandum from
Berlin containing the pledge of the
German government.
While the German ambassador as-
sures Secretary Lansing that his gov-
ernment had no information in regard
to the sinking of the British liner
Persia with United States Consul Mc-
Neely aboard, it is apparent that the
new German assurances have result-
ed from that case.
The presentation of the German
memorandum served to lighten
somewhat the tension that has exist-
ed in official circles since the sinking
of the Persia. The mere fact that
Germany has seen fit to take this
step on her own initiative following so
closely on assurances given by Aus-
tria in her reply to the Ancona note
is regarded by Washington officials
significantly.
With the receipt of the German
memorandum the hopes of this gov-
ernment reaching a satisfactory un-
derstanding with both Germany and
Austria on all phases of the subma-
rine question become noticeably bet-
ter.
KORN'S BODY RECOVERED
FROM RIVER AT 2 A. N.
The press was held this
morning while word came by
phone that the body of Harold
F. Korn was recovered from
the Huron river at 2:00 o'clock,
approximately 100 feet from
where the tragedy occurred.
It was taken to Dolph's under-
taking parlors, and arrange-
ments will be made to send it
to Glenwood Springs, Colo., his
parents" home
UNION HAS NEW
FOLLOW-UP PLAN
Send Out Booklets to AlumniI In Ef-
fort to Raise Subscription
to Millio.
SERVICES OF 125 MEN NEEDEl
In a follow-up campaign to secure

more money for the new Union build-
ing to bring the total number of sub-
scriptions up to the million dollar
mark, the Union is going to send out to
30,000 alumni a booklet and a let-
ter with subscription enclosures.
The booklet is being prepared for
the press now and will Ue ready for!
the mail in another week. In order
to get these off, the Union will need
the services of 100 or 125 men the lat-
ter part of next week, starting most
probably next Thursday. Homer
Heath, graduate manager of the
Union, has charge of this project and
wishes all men who can possibly do
so to report to him for work.

FINALLY COMPLETE
PLANS FOR ANNUAL
This Years' Michiganensian to Surpass
All Former Efforts Is Promise
of Editor Bruch
TO FEATURE STEEL ENGRAVING

TO HOLD TRYOUTS NOTED JOURNALIST
FOR CHORUS PARTSI TALKS WEDNESDAYI

TRAGIC DEATH OF JUNIOR LAW
AND NARROW ESCAPE OF FLOl
YO SADN STUDENTS

Managing Editor Louis M. Bruch,
'16L, of the Michiganensian, an-
nounced that over vacation plans were
made in collaboration with artists of
the company who do the engraving for
the book, for all of the features which
the Michiganensian will contain this
year.
The Michiganensian has broadened
in the last few years until it has be-
come mone than a mere record book
for the seniors and has come to in-
clude all 'undergraduate activities. At
the same tine it has properly retained
all of the features which make it of
interest to seniors. It is with this
intension in mind that the Michigan-
ensian has been planned this year.
There will be a 32 page view sec-
tion made on tinted mezzograph plates.
Most of the views in this section were
taken exclusively for the annual, and
have never been put on sale at any
of the photographers. The feature of
having individual snap shots of stu-
dents has been retained and many
more snapshots will be put in the
book than last year.
Six three-color inserts will be made
on color process plates made from
drawings symbolical of the various
divisions in which the book will be
divided. Provision has been made
to materially increase the number of
half-tone pictures placed in the book.'
Especial attention is directed this
year to the dedication of the annual.
Firstly, the man selected for the honor
of having the book dedicated to him
is a faculty man who is respected and
honored by all of the students and one
to whom the honor has never been
paid before. It has always been the
custom of the management of the
Michiganensian to keep the name of
the man to whom the book is dedicated
a secret until its appearance on the
campus in the spring and the same
custom will be followed this year.
Secondly, moreover, the Michiganen-
sian is taking a step which is distinc-
tive among all year books of the coun-
try this year, and is making the dedi-
cation page from a steel engraving.
This is a great improvement over the
photogravure ordinarily used in that
the delineation of the features of the
man can be much improved and set
forth. The cost of steel engraving
work is very great, but it is believed
worth while because of the effect ob-
tained by this process.
The Michiganensian of last year
was pronounced by competent critics
to be one of the best college annuals
in the country and a great improve-
ment on any previous Michiganensan.
This year's management have set out
to better the book of last year and
judging from the plans of the book
as now completed there is no doubt
but that they will do so.
The seniors' sections of the book
will be made up in panels on three
color plates. This is the most elab-
orate design for the senior panels
ever attempted by the Michiganensian.
In previous years the senior pages
have been printed either in one color
or in plain black over a tint block.
This year separate plates will be made
with different designs for the oppo-
site pages and three colors will be
used instead of one or two.
A uniform color scheme will be
maintained throughout the entire book.

Many Aspirants Endeavor to Make
Good in Poster Contest; Several
Good Drawings Already In
MORGAN ARRIVES ON TUESDAY
First chorus tryouts for the 1916
Michigan Union "Opera will be held
at the Michigan Union at 7:00 o'clock
Monday evening, according to an an-
nouncement given out by those in
charge last night. In view of the fact
that the new director, Mr. Charles P.
Morgan, Jr., will arrive on Tuesday,
the management plans to have the
preliminary chorus tryout before his
arrival. It is expected that the new
director will then immediately begin
the weeding-out process.I
Those trying out for chorus parts
will be judged mainly on their danc-
ing and singing ability, together-with
stage presence and other acting qual-
ities. The play this year requires at
least as many chorus parts as did the
one last year, and it is expected that
the first tryout will bring out a large
number of men. Tryouts can bring
or select dancing partners beforehand
if they so choose.
The poster contest attracted a large
number of campus artists. Theron D.
Weaver stated last night that the
posters in his possession were of ex-
ceptionally high caliber, and gave the
assurance that this year's opera poster
would be an attractive one. The judges
of the posters will be announced in
the next issue of The Daily, and
their decision will be announced early
next week.
Work on the cast parts has been
progressing rapidly. All of the men
have been given a copy of the opera,
so as to have their parts well learned
by the first of next week.
UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS
TO- REPRESENT MICHIGAN
National Security League Holds Next
Congress in Washington Late
This Month

Frederick Palmer, Fresh from War
Zone, to Make Appearance in
11111 Auditorium
HAS SPOKEN TO LARGE CROWDS
Frederick Palmer, fresh from the
battle front, has been given the dis-
tinction by many prominent critics of
having seen more modern warfare
than any American officer or sol-
dier. His actual experience, his stir-
ring stories, together with his unusual
collection of still and motion pictures
should make his lecture in Ann Ar-
bor on Wednesday, January 12, one
of the most interesting on this year's
program.
Palmer comes to Ann Arbor under
the auspices of the Oratorical Asso-
ciation, andn eversince he began his
tour of the country hie has drawn rec-
ord crowds. At his opening lecture in
Carnegie Hall, New York, many per-
sons were unable to obtain admit-
tance.
As an official press correspondent
of the United States, Palmer has been
able to come in contact with the war-
ring tactics of the allied forces, and
is reported as being the only Ameri-
can who has been permitted to visit
England's grand fleet in its mysteri-
ous rendezvous.
Theodore Roosevelt remarled re-
cently in speaking of Palmer that "Ho
has seen more war than any other
living American writer. To his alto-
gether exceptional opportunity for ob-
servation he has added exceptional
power of observation, and of under-
standing appreciation of what he has
observed."
UNIVERSITY ME'N
1FIGHT IN-FLUENZA
Rumor Unfounded That Classes Will
Be Abandoned; Students Contract
Disease at Rolle.
SEVERE BRONCHITIS PREVAILS

SURVIVOR RELATES-
TRAGIC EXPERIENCE,

SKAFTIN
Ft) I

IPAlRTY ENDS IN FIGIRT
LIFE ON PART OF
v oTi IFN

E'.'

E'.'

Floyd Young, '17L,
in Detail After
Arbor

Describes Accident
Rescue by Ann
Officer

YOUNG RISKS LIFE TRYING
TO RESCUE COMPANION
Policeman Sodt Hastens to Save
Young After Half Hour's Struggle
ir ley Waters of Huron
FIND NO TRACE OF KORN'S BODY

f-
:

WAS CAPTAIN OF C .(, C. SQUAD
Floyd Young, '16L, Harold Korn's
companion in last evening's tragedy
on the Huron, told the following story
last night, several hours after he him-
self had been dragged from the river
by Poice Officer Sodt:
"It was about 4:00 o'clock when
"Barley" and I started skating," said
Young, then recovering from the
shock and exhaustion of more than 30
minutes in the frigid stream. "But
it was poor skating and there were
lots of holes in the ice, which we could
see was very thin. After skating
around above the icehouse for per-
haps an hour, we decided to cross to
the other side of the river, where the
railroad runs, and go home. The ice
was very thin but we thought we could
make it all right. Korn was in the
lead and we were as careful as pos-
sible. We had gone some distance
and were within 150 feet, perhaps of
the other side, when the ice gave way
and "Barley" went up to his waist in
the cold water.
Young Gets Plank.
"I was a few feet behind him, care-
fully avoiding the weak places in the
ice, when I heard him cry. But "Bar-
ley" got out all right and stood up
on the ice, which was too thin to
move about on. I saw his predica-
ment and telling him to wait and be
careful of the ice, I skated over to
Tessimer's boat house and got a plank
about 15 feet long. I was gone 10 or
15 minutes and in the meanwhile had
given the alarm to a man who was
nearby.
"But the ice had given way again and
'Pop' was again in the river. I brought
the plank close up to him and laid,
stomach downward, on the board, tell-
ing 'Barley' to grab hold of the other
end as I did so. He seized the end
and clung to it with his hands. All this
time, the man whom I had met on the
shore, was trying to reach us with a
boat, but could not. I was calling to
him telling him what to do and both
of us were yelling as loud as we could
to spread the alarm. I talked to 'Pop'
and told him to keep up his courage
and stick to it and help would soon
be coming.

INV.
vix
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Another notch was cut In the wea-
pon of the Huron river yesterday
when livrold F. 'Kern, '17, loct his
life through drowning in the Icy wat-
ers of the strean4 and a companion,
Floyd L. Young, '16L, was rescued
only with great difficulty after he
haid broken through the ice in a fia-
tile attempt to save horn's life. The
drowning was the result of a skating
party which the two had decided upon
late in the afternoon.. The accident
occurred at about 5:45 o'clock and it
was 6:15 when Young was taken from
the river. A long continued search
for the body of the ill-fated Korn was
barren of results up to a late hour
last night when the search had to be
abandoned. Searchers will resume
their work at an early hour this morn-
Ing and hope to discover the where-
aboits of the body at an early hour.
They were handicapped by the dark-
ness last night.

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President Harry B. Hutchins and
Delegates from among the Univer- I the health service authorities yester-
sity professors will represent the local day asserted that there is absolutely
branch of the National Security no truth in the rumor current about
League at the next congress of that the campus the last few days to the'
society to be held in Washington, D. effect that classes are to be suspend-
C., January 20, 21 and 22, accord- ed on account of the epidemic of la'
ing to the plans advanced at the' Ann Glared that closing school would not
Arbor board of directors' meeting held better conditions, as the students
Friday afternoon. would congregate in many places any-
This society, which has as its aim a way. Few of those now suffering
more adequate protection of the Unit- contracted the disease in Ann Arbor;
ed States by increase of the army and most of them returned from vacation
navy, has almost trebled its number already affected by it.
of centers since the recent congress Though popularly called la grippe
held in Chicago in December. At that or influenza, health service authorities
time the list consisted of 70 branches, say that the disease is really a severe
while now there are 200. The 10- bronchitis. The health service has
cal center has at least 130 members. been treating more than 200 students
Resolutions congratulating Presi- a day lately, and more than three-
dent-Emeritus James B. Angell, hon- fourths of these are suffering with
orary chairman of the board of direc-: this disease. No preventative medi-
tors, upon his birthday were also cine is known and- students are urged
passed. to co-operate with the health service
Preparations are being made to by following out the suggestions given
have several speakers of national re- elsewhere in this issue. The contagi-
pute appear in Ann Arbor in the near ( ous wards of the University hospital
future to lecture upon defense meas- are filled, but all patients are isolated
ures, under the auspices of the in their rooms.
league.
Japan Declares Germany Wants Peace
German Bomb Attack on British Fails London, Jan. 7-Count Okuma, the
London, Jan. 7.-Germans attacked Japanese premier, told interviewers
the British with bombs along the today that Germany had made over-
Lille railway and about Armentieres, tures to both Japan and Russia for a
the war office reported tonight, but' separate peace, but that they had been
were driven back. rejected.
1. I

About 5:30 o'clock it was already
-dark, and as the men were skating
on the river opposite the ice-houses
Korn suggested crossing the river
Young demurred and warned Kori
against the condition of the ice in
mid-stream. In spite of the warnings
his companion set out to cross the
river and was about 100 feet fron
shore when the ice gave way and Korn
plunged into the swift icy 'current
He managed to come to the surface
and cling to the edge of the ice which
constantly broke off in his grasp.
Young Goes for Hlp
Realizing the futility of attempting
rescue without some means of hell
Young started out on his skates and
went nearly to the boat houses be
fore finding a suitable plank. He left
his skates and outer garments her
and started back on the railroad
tracks.
When he had again reached th
place where Korn was still clingini


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Korn Goes Under. to the ice he shoved the plank
"I had pulled him about 10 or 15 despite the warnings of a Mr. I
feet toward the bank with my hands, who had been attracted to the se
when the ice gave way under me and by the cries of the struggling yo-
I also went into the water. My body So dark was it at this time that K
I aso entint th waer.My odycould not be seen
was suspended between the plank and e seen.
a cake of ice on which I managed to Iescuer Breaks Through "ce
keep my feet. Only my head and feet "I can't see him drown," c
were out of the water. I turned Young to the warnings of Neff
around, yelling again and again for despite the intense darkness
help. The man could not get the boat crawled out on the ice shoving
out to us. 'Barley' was murmuring to plank ahead of him. He managed
himself and I could hear him kicking reach the rapidly weakening K
and was trying to get him on
(Continued on Page Six) plank and so out onto the ice w
the ice again gave way, plung
IWHAT'S GOING ON Young into the river. Both cane
the surface and clung to the plar
The weather forecast for Ann Arbor Meanwhile Neff had called the
and vicinity: continued fair and cold. lice, giving as the location the o
TODAY site side of the river and then ii
Mrs. Emma Fox speaks, Sarah Cas- ged a boat to the edge of th. ri,
"" ^go" ", 04 "'717 . I which he was unable to launeh.
well Angell hall, 9:00 o'clock a. m. whcheasublto11 tT"II.
Weekly Union dance, 9:00 o'clock. Korn Succumbs; Young li.u4
Mid-west debating squad tryout, 302 When the police finall. a;r
N. W., 8:00 o'clock. from the opposite sho- O.cr E
Upper Room Bible Class meets, 444 Sodt at once launched the boat
S. State St., 7:00 o'clock. went to the rescue of he drown
TOMORROW youths. Neff was still warning
I C. R. Brown speaks, Methodist officer that both men had gone do
church, 7:30 o'clock. when a voice cam ov the ice.
W. Beahan speaks, Arcade theatre,' I am still here."
6:10 o'clock. Solt immediate; w,; to the-
Menorah Society meets, Newberry cue and pulled . ' u :t of the ri
hall, 8:00 o'clock. Korn had been d;°v. nv under the
-I(Centinud i.. Page Six)

* * * ,i'~** 4 * *

4
7*:
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*I

*Y
Police Ask for Student Aid -*

Chieof Police Frank Par-
don last nikht asked for 25
student volunteers to assist in
the search for the body of
Harold Korn who was drowned
in the Huron River last night.
The men are asked to report on
the railroad side of the river
near the ice-house at 8 o'clock
- this morning.

*: I
4:.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
LEONARD A. BARRETT Speaks
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.
Theme: "Multiplication by Division."

II

4.4 4 * '~, * *4* * * *

1 u

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